The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Magazine search: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine
 from antiquity to 2017



  
 Reggie Rivers #1
“A Gun for Dinosaur”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Galaxy, Mar 1956

Dinosaur hunters Reggie Rivers (no relation to the Denver Bronco) and his partner, the Raja, organize time-travel safaris in a world with a Hawking-style chronological protection principle.

In 1992, Silverberg asked de Camp to provide one sequel to the by-then classic “A Gun for Dinosaur.’ De Camp complied and used it as a springboard to write seven more stories over the next year. All those stories plus the original Reggie River adventure were published together in the 1993 collection Rivers of Time. After de Camp’s death, Chris Bunch wrote a tenth story as a tribute to the master.

 Oh, Im no four-dimensional thinker; but, as I understand it, if people could go back to a more recent time, their actions would affect our own history, which would be a paradox or contradiction of facts. Cant have that in a well-run universe, you know. 








   The Chronopath Stories
by Steven Utley
First story: Galaxy, Jan 1976

I’ve read only the first of this series of stories which predates Utley’s better known Silurian tales. The first-person narrator, Bruce Holt, tells of his power (which he didn’t ask for and has no control over) of traveling through time and being deposited in other beings’ minds for a brief few seconds at a time.
  1. Getting Away (Jan 1976) Galaxy
  2. Predators (Oct 1976) The Ideas of Tomorrow
  3. To 1966 (Spring 1977) Chacal
  4. Spectator Sport (Jul 1977) Amazing
  5. The Maw (Jul 1977) F&SF
  6. Time and Hagakure (Winter 1977) Asimovs
  7. Where or When (Jan 1991) Asimovs
  8. The Glowing Cloud (Jan 1992) Asimovs
  9. Now That We Have Each Other (Jul 1992)   Asimovs
  10. One Kansas Night (Jun 1994) Asimovs
  11. Living It (Aug 1994) Asimovs
  12. Staying in Storyville (Dec 2006) in When or Where
  13. Life’s Work (Dec 2006) in When or Where
  14. The Here and Now (Mar 1998) Asimovs

 What do you want me to do? Go back and find out where Captain Kidd buried his loot? 

—“Getting Away”




   “Air Raid”
by John Varley
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Spring 1977

Mandy snatches doomed people from the past in order to populate her war-decimated time.

 I had to choose between a panic if the fathead got them to thinking, and a possible panic from the flash of the gun. But when a 20th gets to talking about his “rights” and what he is “owed,&rdauo; things can get out of hand. 


   Time Storm
by Gordon R. Dickson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Spring-Summer 1977

Marc Despard, along with his teenaged friend Girl and their leopard Sunday, travels through an Earth ravenged by storms that push and pull swathes of land from one time to another.
Although the book was published in Oct 1977, it’s first half appeared as two long extracts in the first two issues of Asimovs Science Fiction (“Time Storm” in Spring 1977 and “Across the River” in Summer 1977).

 In the weeks since the whole business of the time changes started, I had not been this close to being caught since that first day in the cabin northwest of Duluth, when I had, in fact, been caught without knowing what hit me. 




   “The Astronomical Hazards of the
Tobacco Habit”

by Dean McLaughlin
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Summer 1977

Whenever an effect of an action occurs before that action itself (i.e., an endochronic property), I consider it to be time travel, with the canonical example being Asimov’s Thiotimoline research first published in 1948. According to McLaughlin, Asimov continued that research, using the profits to establish a foundation that funds further research into such phenomena.

 Dr. Isaac Asimov
Director: Thiotimoline Research Foundation
Trantor MA31416
 


   “Joelle”
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Fall 1977

Canadian Eruc Stranathan is one of the few people in the world who can merge his mind with computer hardware, taking him to mental vistas beyond that of mere humans. At a conference to explore the possibilities of the technology, he meets the beautiful American Joelle who shares his ability. The two fall deeply in love, but because of security restrictions, it’s fifteen months before she can show him the capabilities of her mind-machine connection.

The time-travel connection is slight in this long story, but it is relevant to Joelle. As I read though, I wondered whether the story could have been much more had the time-travel element been taken more to heart.

 He swept out of the cell, through space and through time, at light-speed across unseen prairies, into the storms that raged down a great particle accelerator. 


Freff’s interior drawing for the story   “Lorelei at Storyville West”
by Sherwood Spring
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Fall 1977

A writer who’s working on a book about Dixieland singers interviews the one man who might have a 1955 tape recording of Ruby Benton whose voice always drew comparisons to the most outstanding singer you’d ever heard. The man does indeed have a recording as well as a theory about why Ruby disappeared from the clubs of Storyville West at the particular time she did.

 The tatoo was obviously her social security number, but it was preceded by an “A” and followed by a space and five additional digits. 


   The Backspace Stories
by F.M. Busby
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Winter 1977

After fixing the smog problem by reversing the direction of Earth’s spin, Pete’s flaky friend Sam shows up with device that includes a calendar display and a grey backspace button. That, of course, was in the 1977 story, “Backspace”. I don’t know whether there were any earlier stories of Peter and Sam before the backspace button appeared, but there were several others afterward in Asimovs Science Fiction. In the second story (“Balancing Act”), Sam could still “edit” time, even though he’d burned out the backspace button by stopping World War III. It’s unclear whether this second sort of editing involves time travel, but it is fun to speculate on what I might edit if given the chance.
  1. Backspace (Winter 1977) enter the backspace button
  2. Balancing Act (16 Feb 1981) editing Pete’s bloopers and more
  3. Backup System (26 Oct 1981) Sam’s death causes backspacing
  4. Wrong Number (21 Dec 1981) aliens v. Russia

 My friend Sam is the only person I know who edits events. Which is to say, he does something in his head and the past changes; the alterations, of course also reflect into the present and the future. 

—“Backup System”


I lament that the sf zines of today have relatively few interior illustrations such as this pen and ink drawing by Roy G. Krenkel for Garrett’s story.   “On the Martian Problem”
by Randall Garrett
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Winter 1977

Ed’s “Uncle Jack’ writes to him with an explanation about why the recent Martian landers show such a different Mars than that which Jack himself has visited and written about.

 To the Reader of this Work:
In submitting Captain Carters strange manuscript to you in book form, I believe that a few words relative to this remarkable personality will be of interest.
My first recollection of Captain Carter is of the few months he spent at my fathers home in Virginia, just prior to the opening of the civil war. I was then a child of but five years, yet I well remember the tall, dark, smooth-faced, athletic man whom I called Uncle Jack. . . .
very sincerely yours,
Edgar Rice Burroughs
 

—from the foreward to A Princess of Mars


   “Grimes at Glenrowan”
by A. Bertram Chandler
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar/Apr 1978

Bertram’s widely traveled, spacefaring captain John Grimes had at least one adventure through time which he told to a pretty reporter named Kitty on the Rim World of Elsinore. It seems that when Grimes was a much younger spacehand on leave in his native Australia, he once ran into two former crewmates who had figured out how to project themselves and Grimes into their own nefarious ancestors in the 1880 outback.

I’m still searching for other time travel stories about Grimes or Chandler’s Rim Worlds.

 “I built it,” said Kelly, not without pride.
“What for?” I asked. “Time Travel?” I sneered.
“Yes,” he said.
 


interior art by George Barr   “The Small Stones of Tu Fu”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar/Apr 1978

A time traveler enjoys spending time with the aged poet Tu Fu in 770 A.D.

 Swimming strongly on my way back to what the sage called the remote future, my form began to flow and change according to time pressure. Sometimes my essence was like steam, sometimes like a mountain. 


   “The Last Full Measure”
by George Alec Effinger
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May/Jun 1978

Corporal Bo Staefler lands and dies on Normandy Beach on D-Day, after which an alien brings him back to life and asks him to do it all again (and again), making sure to pay attention to all the details.

 He went through every moment, every step, every ragged breath, every slow, wading, stumbling yard through the cold water to the beach. And it all felt the same, as though he were just a spectator. The shell exploded. Staefler died a second time. 


   “One Rejection Too Many”
by Paula Nurse
First publication: Asimov’s Clarke’s Science Fiction, Jul/Aug 1978

A time-traveling writer gets more and more fed up with Isaac Asimov’s demands for rewrites on his story submissions.

 Anything you can do to expediate the publishing of Vahls story will be most appreciated, so that he will feel free to return to his own time. 


interior art by Freff

   “The Adventure of the Global Traveler”
aka “The Global Consequences of How the Reichenbach Falls into the Wells of Iniquitie”
by Anne Lear
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep/Oct 1978

Apparently, that trip over the Reichenbach Falls didn’t kill Moriarty after all. Instead, he survived to build a Time Velocipede (which he showed off to some guy named Wells) only to be trapped back in the time of Shakespeare and the Globe Theater.

 Having learned early of the dangers attendant upon being unable to move the Time Machine, I had added to its structure a set of wheels and a driving chain attached to the pedals originally meant simply as foot rests. In short, I converted it into a Time Velocipede. 




   “Scrap from the Notebooks of
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe”

by K.W. MacAnn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep/Oct 1978

Mephistopheles agrees to take Faust into Hell and one other destination in time.

 Faust and Mephistopheles entered the tavern and shed their heavy overcoats. 




   “Fair Exchange?”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine, Fall 1978

John Sylva has invented a temporal transference device that allows his friend Herb to enter the mind of a man in 1871 London and to thereby attend three performances of a lost Gilbert & Sullivan play.

I read this story as I was starting my graduate studies in Pullman in 1978. Sadly, there was no second issue of Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine.

 We cant be sure how accurate our estimates of time and place are, but you seem to resonate with someone in London in 1871. 


   “One More Time”
by Jack Gaughan
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov/Dec 1978

One thing you can be certain of when you meet a nostalgic physicist in a science fiction story: There’s gonna be some time travelin’. In this case, the nostalgic narrator travels from 1978 back to pastoral American days at the end of the Great Depression with the goal of helping his father stand up to a domineering wife.

Gaughan was better know as a prolific sf artist, but he also produced this story and one other for Asimov’s Science Fiction.

 So I told him.
From beginning to end (well not end, I didnt tell him of his own funeral) and tried to leave nothing out that was pertinent to the plan. I didnt know what else to do. The year 1939 may have been ready for Buck Rogers or Brick Bradford and his Time Top, but was it ready for the hard, cold reality of time travel?
 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Thirty Love” by Jack C. Haldeman II, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1979 [precognition ]

   “Garbage”
by Ron Goulart
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan 1979

“Garbage”—which I read during the 1978 Christmas when Janet visited me in Washington—was my first exposure to Goulart, who is the Mel Brooks of short science fiction. In the story, Product Investigation Enterprises agent Dan Tockson sends a typevox memo to his boss explaining what went wrong in an investigation into a Florida food with were-ish side effects.

There was no time travel in the food investigation, but at the start of Tockson’s memo, he refers to a previous investigation that took him to 15th century Italy. I found one later Tockson story, “Ask Penny Jupiter,’ but it was timetravelless.

 “Youre angry because I stayed in fifteenth-century Italy so long?”
Im not especially mad,” you answered, growling. “but the Time Travel Overseeing Community wasnt much pleased. You shouldnt have dropped in on Leonardo da Vinci with those tips on aerodynamics.’
 


   “Ahead of the Joneses”
by Al Sarrantonio
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1979

Harry Jones’s neighbor has a compulsion to own every modern gadget that’s bigger and better and more whiz-bang than whatever Harry’s got.

 Eat your heart out Harry Jones! 


   “The Dead of Winter”
by Kevin O'Donnell, Jr.
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1979

Four miners, trapped over winter in a mountain cabin, run out of food, but three people in a love triangle show up from the future with a couple of candy bars, a flask of drink, and a fued.

 “Oh, well—” He runs his pasty white hands through hispockets while Cole and the girl do the same. “I have a candy bar or two, I believe,” and he brings them out. “Cole, you have a bottle, dont you?"
The guy with the black hat scowls at him, but brings a flask out of his hip pocket and lays it on the table.
 


interior art by
Vincent Di Fate
   “The Pinch-Hitters”
by George Alec Effinger
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1979

Sandor Courane and four other up-and-coming sf writers are snagged from their hotel at a 1979 convention in New Orleans only to wake up the next morning as five insignificant major league ballplayers in 1954—and the aging Sandor is hitting only .221.

 I felt angry. I wanted to show that kid, but there wasnt anything I could show him, with the possible exception of sentence structure. 


   “The Merchant of Stratford”
by Frank Ramirez
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 1979

The world’s first time traveler sets out to visit a retired Will Shakespeare, carrying a long a case of books that he hopes will be a unique treat for the immortal bard.

 In my storage case were volumes for his perusal—a concise history of the world through the year 2000, a selection of the greatest poets since the master, selected volumes of Shakespearean criticism, and the massive one-volume Armstead Shakespeare, the definitive Shakespeare, published in 1997. 


   “Jenning’s Operative Webster”
by J.E. Walters
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1979

For a fee, Jenning’s time-travel agency which will send Webster back through the time stream to inhabit other’s bodies in an attempt to alter some important event such as the loss of a son in Vietnam.

 The fabric of time is a delicate, almost whimsical thing. Our success rate runs at nearly eight-two percent, and within the industry that is an enviable rate. But we just can not guarantee success. 


   The Alternities, Inc. Stories
by John M. Ford
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1979

I read the first of Ford’s stories in which a small group of men and women, ever hopeful of finding their Homeline, march through a narrow tube where hatches to alternate worlds and alternate times appear every 100 kilometers. I think that most of the Earthlike worlds have a corporation—Alternities, Inc.—which has tried to turn a profit on the tubes.
  1. Mandalay (Oct 1979) Asimov's
  2. Out of Service (Jul 1980) Asimov's
  3. Slowly By, Lorena (Nov 1980) Asimov's
  4. Intersections (26 Oct 1981) Asimov's

 Clever people he worked for.
But not clever enough to preven the Fracture, when Augustan Romans had tumbled into the waters of the Spanish Main and bandannaed urban guerillas shot the hell out of the Sun Kings palace at Verasilles. Not clever enough to point the way to Homeline, except as a hundred-kilometer march from line to line through a hexagonal sewer in Space4.
 

—“Mandalay’


   “Twist Ending”
by Barry B. Longyear
First publication: Asimov's Science Fiction, Nov 1979

An intelligent Dromaeosaurus named GerG (or maybe just an actor playing GerG in a story, it’s hard to tell), prepares to travel 70,000,000 years into the future in order to pave the way for all the soon-to-be-extinct dinosaurs to escape.

 There exists but one node of time/future open within the range of our frames. You must go there and prepare the way for our exodus. Else, the supernova shall extinguish us all. 


   “Written in Sand”
by Robert Chilson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 1979

Paul Enias travels from 21st century Egypt back to the third century where he becomes Pausanias, falls in love with the slave Taia, and takes advice from Appolonius about which of 750,000 available books to bury in clay jars for future Egyptians to discover.

 Odd that the book-man should shrug off the value of books, but Pausanias had too much to do to ponder it, overseeing the copying, the shipping of the books up the Nile, the reorganization of his new estate, and of course there was taia, then a new—bride. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Back to Byzantium” by Mark J. McGarry, Asimov’s, Feb 1979 [ancestral memory ]

“Illusions” by Tony Sarowitz and Paul David Novitski, Asimov’s, Jun 1979 [just trust me: ]

“The Thaw” by Tanith Lee, Asimov’s, Jun 1979 [long sleep ]





Three collections of the puzzles were published in the 1980s.
   Martin Gardner’s SF Puzzles
by Martin Gardner
First time travel puzzle: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 1980

Growing up, I read every Martin Gardner science book that I could lay my hands on. Janet even claims that I ignored her on our honeymoon in order to read Gardner’s Relativity for the Million (which is absolutely not true—it was The Ambidextrous Universe). Gardner was a colleague and friend of Asimov’s, which led to a series of sf puzzle stories beginning in the first issue of IASFM and continuing through November of 1986. There was a mention of tachyons in the Mar/Apr 1978 puzzle (“The Third Dr. Moreau”), and the May 1979 puzzle (“How Bagson Bagged a Board Game”) had a device to view the past, but the first actual time travel didn’t occur until February of 1980, quickly followed by another in July 1980 (which coincidentally was the month of the disputed honeymoon).
  1. Professor Cracker’s Antitelephone (Feb 1980) reverse-time phone
  2. The Backward Banana (Jul 1980) fruit travels in time
  3. The Queer Story of Gardner’s Magazine (Aug 1980) magazine from 2556
  4. Parallel Pasts (26 Oct 1981) to the past in a parallel world

 Somewhere in the text is a block of letters which taken forward spell the last name of a top science fiction author who has written about time travel. 

—“The Backward Banana”




   “Eight Ball Blues”
by Jack C. Haldeman II
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 1980

A time traveler from the 21st century comes to a Florida bar to talk with pool shark Tucker “Skeeter” Moore about his choices in marriage and about saving the world.

 Now wait a minute! I married—er, Im going to marry—Betty-Ann? 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Travels” by Carter Scholz, Asimov’s, Apr 1980 [no definite time travel ]

“Trans Dimensional Imports” by Sharon N. Farber, Asimov’s, Aug 1980 [alternate timelines ]



   “Death in Vesunna”
by Harry Turtledove and Elaine O’Byrne (as by Eric Iverson and Elaine O’Byrne)
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 19 Jan 1981

Lou Muller and his partner-in-crime Mark Alvarez (a.k.a. Lucius and Marcus) travel back from 2059A.D. to obtain Sophokles’s lost play Aleadai, but when the owner of the rare manuscript won’t part with it, they kill him and take it, counting on the obscurity of the backwater second-century town to stop the Time Patrol from discovering their foul deed. That may be so, but they didn’t count on Gaius Tero, one of the second century’s finest, and the sharp-tongued physician Kleandros.

 Whatever. And as for the Time Patrol, why are we here in the boondocks instead of at the library of Alexandria? Why do we insist on so much privacy when we make our deals? Just so they wont run across us. And they wont. 


   “Graffiti”
by Gary Alexander
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 19 Apr 1981

Seventeen years working as the nighttime janitor in the Winston Building and Harv Blasingame has neer seen the likes of this futuristic graffiti that refuses to be obliterated.

 THE ALLIANCE IS AN IMPOTENT SHAM, IT’S PRINCIPAL EXPORT BEING STUPIDITY AND TREACHERY. 


Some of the stories were collected in this 1985 collection.   The Pshrinks Anonymous Stories
by Janet Asimov (as by J.O. Jeppson)
First time travel: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 13 Apr 1981

I haven’t read all of psychiatrist Janet Asimov’s stories of a lunchclub whose Pshrink members relate to each other stories about various patients, but the two I did read had fantastic case studies involving time travel.
  1. The Hotter Flash (13 Apr 1981) Menopausal time travel in Asimov’s
  2. The Time-Warp Trauma (21 Dec 1981) Central Park time warps in Asimov’s

 Doctors dont know anything. I lived through it, and I know that my hot flashes certainly were hotter. 

—“The Hotter Flash”


   The Cases of Ben Hardy, Time Detective
by Warren Salomon
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 11 May 1981

For me, Salomon’s first story of Ben Hardy, hard-boiled temporal private eye, was about one Delorean shy of having enough boisterous fun that I could completely ignore the inconsistencies in the time-travel model—but even so, I had fun as Ben attempted to restore time to its rightful path for heiress Patricia Wadsworth (and in the process try to figure out the familial relations between himself, Pat, Pat’s parents, the inventor of time travel, and that dastardly lawyer).
  1. Time & Punishment (11 May 1981) first story in Asimov
  2. Time on My Hands (Oct 1982) in Asimov’s
  3. As Time Goes By (Feb 1984) in Asimov’s

 They all say that. “Why is it,” I asked her, “you seem to remember the, ah, original sequence? In a reality change, memories are altered along with everything else. How can you be certain that time has been tampered with?” That question usually ends it right there. 


   “Dinosaur Weather”
by Dona Vaughn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 3 Aug 1981

The real reason for the extinction of the dinosaurs becomes apparent, a reason that makes a certain restaurant cat very happy and very fat.

 I frowned and made a mental note to buy an umbrella. 


   “End Game”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Asimov`'s Science Fiction, 21 Dec 1981

Thing wonderous: a review that is palindromic. Yes, palindromic! Is that review a wonderous thing?

 Thunder. Distant sound.
Questions posed shake universes like constructs , like universes, shake posed questions, sound distant thunder.
 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“These Stones Will Remember” by Reginald Bretnor, Asimov’s, 16 Feb 1981 [viewing the past ]

“Liros: A Tale of the Quintana Roo” by James Tiptree, Jr., Asimov’s, 28 Sep 1981 [no definite time travel ]
aka “What Came Ashore at Lirios”





   The Oxford Time-Traveling Historians
by Connie Willis
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 15 Feb 1982

In the first short story of the series, an Oxford graduate student travels back to the World War II bombing of St. Paul’s for his history practicum. This launched a series of novels, the first of which has Kivrin Engle being sent to 14th century England, but when she arrives, she can’t remember where and when her pickup will be. The second book incorporated more comedy, and the last two returned to World War II.
  1. “Fire Watch” (15 Feb 1982) Asimovs
  2. The Doomsday Book (1992) Kivrin Engle to 1320 Oxford
  3. To Say Nothing of the Dog (1998)    Ned Henry to 1888 Oxford
  4. Blackout (2010) Michael, Polly and Merope to WW II England
  5. All Clear (2010) continuation of Blackout

 “But Im not ready,” Id said. “Look, it too me four years to get ready to travel with St Paul. St Paul. Not St Pauls. You cant expect me to get ready for London in the Blitz in two days.” 


   “Park Your Car on Baychester Road Tonight”
by Bill Bickel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 15 Mar 2015

In the process of parking his car on a Wednesday night—always a difficult proposition—a man is approached by a time traveler who offers him two gold bars if he’s park in a No Parking zone.

 My friend Selka and I have devised a game in which we carefully alter the stream of time, to cause some subtle change in our own time period. This particular round, for example, concerns itself with the location of our citys capitol building. 


   “Amy, at the Bottom of the Stairs”
by John M. Ford
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1982

Warnke, a time traveler who has visited the moment of a past death more than once, comes to the house of Lady Amy Dudley née Robsart) on the eve that she is fated to fall down the stairs in an accident that her husband, Robert Dudley (an accused but reprieved conspirator in the taking of the English throne by Jane Grey) will be suspected of arranging so that he would be free to marry Elizabeth I.

 Im not a seer. Im a . . . traveler. From one time to another. Do you understand? I know when youll die, and where, and how, because its all written down in a history book. 


   The Aquila Trilogy
by S.P. Somtow (aka Somtow P. Sucharitkul)
First time travel: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1982

In an alternate second century where Romans rule a swathe of North America as far as the Dakotas, Titus Papinianus meets the Lakota chief Aquila who first teaches him a new way to fight the hoards from Asia and then leads him on adventures (including the time-traveling Central Dimension Patrol Authority) from modern-day Mexico to China.
  1. 1. “Aquila the God’ (Jan 1982) Asimov’s
  2. 1. “Aquila’ (Jan 1982) Asimov’s
  3. 2. “Aquila the God’ (Apr 1982) Asimov’s
  4. 3. “Aquila Meets Bigfoot’ (Jan 1983) Amazing
  5. 4. “Aquila: The Final Conflict’ (May 1983) Amazing
  6. 5. The Aquilad (Dec 1983) combines 1-4
  7. 6. Aquila and the Iron Horse (May 1988) Volume II
  8. 7. Aquila and the Sphinx (Dec 1988) Volume III

 I understood very little of what he was saying, but he went on to say that he was from the far future and that they had come in search of certain criminals who had to be brought to trial, who were guilty of attempting to tamper with the past . . . . 


   “All the Time in the World”
by Daniel Keyes Moran
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1982

Seven centuries after the Big Crunch atomic war, one of the clan of Huntresses learns to travel back in time after talking with aliens and perhaps sensing the man who would be negative entropy.

 Here we have a time traveller, and her name is Jalian. Yes, Jalian dArsennette, except that there have been some changes. 


   “Azimuth 1,2,3...”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1982

Shortly after genius Azimuth Backfiler (yes, that’s his real name) finds a way to travel back in time, Azimuth 2 appears and hands him next week’s newspaper causing some sort of feedback that create Azimuth 3, Azimuth 4, . . .

 Therefore, he was not surprised to see himself emerge from the chamber, wearing this very suit, a moment after he had formed the decision. 


The story also appeared in this 1989 collection of time-travel fiction taken from Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine.   “The Comedian”
by Tim Sullivan (as by Timothy Robert Sullivan)
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1982

A projected vision from the future takes on the forms of various 20th century comedians from Charley Chaplin to Don Rickles, and he’s also making wildlife manager Chris Reilly kidnap children.

 The comedian looked just like a living, breathing, three-dimensional human being, the reincarnation of Lenny Bruce, come to see the unhappy world end. 


   “Good Golly, Miss Molly”
by Steven Bryan Bieler
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1982

When Dr. Demented Physicist Particle Breakdown bets his entire life savings on a horse race and the campus’s best handicapper picks Miss Molly instead, the good Dr. Breakdown has no choice but to further handicap Miss Molly.

 Locating his car, Dr. Breakdown extracted from the trunk a Phillips-head screwdriver, a toothbrush, his spare tire, five felt pens, and a plumbers helper. With these materials he constructed a duplicate of the time machine in the university physics lab. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Lazarus Rising” by Gregory Benford, Asimov’s, Jul 1982 [long sleep ]

“Dr. Time” by Sharon N. Farber, et. al., Asimov’s, Oct 1982 [despite title, no time travel ]

   “Sweet Song of Death”
by Stephen Kimmel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 1983

Dave, an old man on the verge of dying, partakes in a time travel experiment, hoping to save his long-ago wife and young daughter from a car accident even though nobody has ever managed to change past events before.

 If our hypothesis is correct and the Corvini-Langstrum effect is a form of time travel . . . then you may be able to change the circumstances and prevent her death. 


   “Short Timer”
by John Morressy
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1983

After the Traveller’s miniature time machine makes its way back to Lilliput and the Emperor scares himself witless by a short trip forward in time, Pilibosh (a court carpenter) accidentally takes it out for a longer spin, finding H.G. Wells and Irish leprechauns along the way.

 The story does not begin with Pilibosh. In a bewildering cosmological sense it does not begin at all, nor does it end. But that is a matter best left to the philosophers. 


   “Sunlight”
by Paul E. Holt
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1983

A reporter with the Time Warp Review is doing a story on a former mobster who doesn’t want to leave his condemned building. But what does he want? Fortunately, the reporter and his warpfotographer have a way to see what’s in the mobster’s future—or maybe it’s more than that.

 I did a lotta things in my life that I ought notta. 


   “Stolen Moments”
by Brad Strickland
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1983

A peculiar man repeatedly delays a small-town lawyer from taking what seems to be a most important phone call.

 It falls our task to correct untoward trends in history, eliminating unhappy catastrophe. 


   “Time Bride”
by Gardner Dozois and Jack Dann
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 1983

Shortly after turning eight, Marcy Meisner loses her childhood to an everpresent voice from the future who (so he assures Marcy’s parents) wants to marry Marcy when she grows up and has only Marcy’s best interests at heart.

 Please let me explain, Mr. Meisner. I dont want to marry Marcy now. I want to marry her in the future, ten years from now, when shes eighteen. That is, I believe, an acceptable age. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Concerto in B Demolished” by Al Sirois, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan 1983 [clones ]

   “Post Haste”
by Sharon Farber, James P. Killus, Susanna Jacobson and Dave Stout
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 1984

Science fiction writer Buzz Bailey has had several recent ideas for stories, including one about finding parking spaces through time travel, but the problem is that the top market, Prognosto Science Fiction, keeps vehemently rejecting the stories before they’re even written.

 “What the? . . .” He tipped up the envelope. Ashes spilled onto the floor. 


   “Ghost Lecturer”
by Ian Watson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1984

A conceited man brings Lucretius to the present in order to explain to the classical scientist exactly where he was wrong, but it turns out that Lucretius’s classical atomism was brought along with him.

 What;s happening? Ill tell you what’s happening. Those “films” you see flying off surfaces and hitting your eyes—thats how our friend here thought visions worked. And now were seeing it happen, as though its true. 




   “Twilight Time”
by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1984

Travis goes back to 1961 and the dance where he met his now-departed sweetheart, but he also has memories of aliens who quietly took over the world.

 A decade of peace and quiet and short hair was winding down; a time when people knew their place and stayed in it. For ten years nobody had wanted anything but a new car and a bigger TV set. Now all that was about to change. In a little over a year the Cuban missile crisis would send thousands of people into their back yards to dig bomb shelters, and “advisors” would start pouring into Southeast Asia. In another year the president would be dead. 


   “Christian”
by Ian McDonald
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1984

In his favorite secret spot, a little boy meets Christian who tells the boy how he wanted to be a toymaker but instead had to be a ship pilot because of his special talents to see a bit into the future and the past. Now, Christian waits for the machine that he loved to return for him, and while he waits he builds kites, including one that moves a bit into the future and the past.

 Well, you see, most kites fly in the three dimensions that were familiar with in our world, but some kites flyu in four or even five dimensions and go a little bit outward and a little bit inward into time. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Writing Time” by Isaac Asimov, Asimov’s Science Fiction, July 1984 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Realtime” by Gladys Prebehalla and Daniel Keys Moran, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1984 [despite title, no time travel ]



   “Sailing to Byzantium”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Feb 1985

Charles Phillips is a 20th-century New Yorker in a 50th-century world of immortal leisurites who recreate cities from the past. The one item that you should find out for yourself, I’ll put into a cypher: rgwew ua bi runw relcwk~

 He knew very little about himself, but he knew that he was not one of them. That he knew. He knew that his name was Charles Phillips and that before he had come to live among these people he had lived in the year 1984, when there had been such things as computers and television sets and baseball and jet planes, and the world was full of cities, not merely five but thousands of them, New York and London and Johannesburg and Parks and Liverpool and Bangkok and San Francisco and Buenos Ares and a multitude of others, all at the same time. 


   “The Lost Garden of Enid Blyton, Beatrix Potter, Lucy Atwell and the Rest of the Lads of the 32nd Parachute Regiment”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1985

Offa Smith travels to the Garden of Eden to prevent Eve from eating the apple and thereby guarantee immortality for himself (and all mankind, though that’s beyond the point).

 Lets put it this way—if you do persuade the lady to take a bite, you lose your legs. 


   “Klein’s Machine”
by Andrew Weiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1985

After Philip Herbert Klein returns from a psycosis-inducing trip in his time machine, he has philosophical conversations with his psychiatrist.

 The hamster is back. Also my wristwatch, which I strapped on its back. 




   “The Pure Product”
by John Kessel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Mar 1986

A cynical psychopath from the future takes a road trip (sometimes with random blood, sometimes with trite tripping) across 20th-century North America.

 “I said, have you got something going,” she repeated, still with the accent—the accent of my own time. 


   “Landscape with Giant Bison”
by Avram Davidson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1986

Never is it easy to discern what’s in the mind of the indiscernable Avram Davidson, but I suspect that he was on a train journey with a plethora of tourists—perhaps the California Zephyr, which enters the majestic Rockies at a point just outside of Eldorado State Park—and he thought to himself, “Just what would it take to pull my fellow travelers away from that there card game?”

 A wooly rhino appeared out of nowhere on the right side of the track, its red hide caked with mud and dust, and paced the car for two miles; then it slackened and turned away, was lost to sight. 


   “Dinosaur on a Bicycle”
by Tim Sullivan
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1987

Harry Quince-Pierpont Fotheringgay, the assistant to the learned Sir Brathewaite pedals a time bicycle from a civilized Victorian era to the distant path where, among others, he meets his own tyranosaur ancestor and two talking simians.

 As far as Harry was concerned, they were getting altogether too near his gigantic ancestor now. 


   “Perpetuity Blues”
by Neal Barrett, Jr.
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1987

Orphaned at a young age and sent to live with her abusive aunt and uncle, Maggie befriends the town’s odd duck, Oral, whose magic loop of wire protects the young girl. Oh—and I forgot to mention: Oral believes he’s from outer space and his ship bounces him through time.

 Got the ship clear out of the atmosphere and hit this time warp or something. Nearly got eat by Vikings. Worse than the Mormons. Fixed up the ship and flipped it out again. Ended up in Medival Europe. Medicis and monks, all kinds of shit. Joined someones army in Naples. Got caught and picked olives for a duke. Lok at my face. They got diseases you never heard of there. 


   “Rider”
aka “Fugue”
by Andrew Weiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 1987

Arnold Lerner is deep into a fugue—a state that allows him to revisit past memories and rewrite them in your own mind. But he’s so deeply in fugue that he won’t ever come out. Then again, some people doubt both those sentences: Ruth Brandon, director of the Hartley Mind Research Center, says that it’s a long shot, but she might be able to go in after Lerner and pull him out; and some say that the rewriting of history is not just in your own mind.

Among other places, the story takes Ruth Brandon to the 1970 total solar eclipse in Miahuatlán; and quite by coincidence, I first read the story when I happened to take the July 1987 issue of Asimov’s with me on our road trip to Scottsbluff to see the Great American Coast-to-Coast eclipse of 2017. The stars (and the Moon) move in mysterious ways.

 Even if you do come back. They say you really do travel in time and that you really can change things if you try hard enough. 


   “At the Cross-Time Jaunter’s Ball”
by Alexander Jablokov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1987

Jacob Landstatter is an art critic, and his chosen objects d’art are the alternate realities that the Lords of Time commission from artists who go back in time to make specific changes that result in worlds of one sort or another. So who could want to kill someone with such an occupation as innocuous as Jacob’s?

 Normal intestinal flora. Mutated and hybridized with amyotrophic lateral schlerosis. Infects via the GI tract and destroys the central nervous systems of higher primates. Neat. Grew it in the guts of an Australopithecine on the African veldt, two, three million years ago. Not easy, Jacob, not easy. When I woke up on that pallet at Centrum, I had bedsores, and a headache that lasted a month. Killed them all. Every last one of the buggers. Nothing left on this planet with more brains than an orangutan. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Enter a Soldier, Later: Enter Another” by Robert Silverberg, Asimov’s, Jun 1989 [simulacrum ]

“Traplanda” by Charles Sheffield, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1987 [despite appearances, no time travel ]

   “The Grandfather Problem”
by Andrew Weiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1988

Purely as a scientific experiment, physicist Harold Levett decides to go back in time to kill his grandfather.

 “Its nothing personal,” I say. “Its strictly a scientific question . . .” 


   Insurance Fraud
by Mark Heath
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1988

 Full coverage in event of death due to suicidal, time-traveling grandsons . . . 




   “Ripples in the Dirac Sea”
by Geoffrey A. Landis
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1988

A physics guy invents a time machine that can go only backward and must always return the traveler to the exact same present from which he left.

 

  1. Travel is possible only into the past.
  2. The object transported will return to exactly the time and place of departure.
  3. It is not possible to bring objects from the past to the present.
  4. Actions in the past cannot change the present.
 

   “Real Time”
by Lawrence Watt-Evans
First publication: Asimovs’s Science Fiction, Jan 1989

An unnamed time-travel guard is trapped in the 20th century and must keep ever vigilant against those who might tamper with the time line because you never know whether the time guard will be able to handle it all.

 They might send someone else, but they might not. The tampering might have already changed things too much. 


The story also appeared in this 1994 collection.   “The Ring of Memory”
by Alexander Jablokov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan 1989

Time travel agent Hugh Solomon chases through time after Andy Tarkin who blames Hugh for the death of their common crush in 1902 Chicago.

The story has a nice bootstrapping paradox.

 Have you sold a ring recently, in the shape of a serpent with its own tail in its mouth? 




   “The Price of Oranges”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1989

Harry’s closet takes him back to 1937 where his social security income buys cheaper oranges, treats for his friend Manny, and possibly a companionable man for his jaded granddaughter Jackie.

 Harry bought a pair of socks, thick gray wool, for 89 cents. When the man took his dollar, Harry held his breath: each first time made a little pip in his stomach. But on one ever looked at the dates of old bills. He bought two oranges for five cents each, and then, thinking of Manny, bought a third. At a candystore he bought G-8 and His Battle Aces for fifteen cents. At The Collectors Cozy in the other time they would gladly give him thirty dollars for it. Finally, he bought a cherry Coke for a nickel and headed towards the park. 




   “The Time Traveler”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Nov 1990

The little demon Azazel (the hero of many an Asimov tale) sends a world-renowned writer travels back in time to see his first writing teacher at a 1934 school that is remarkably like Asimov’s own Boys High in Brooklyn.

 “Because,” and here he struck his chest a resounding thump, “the burning memories of youthful snubs and spurnings remain unavenged and, indeed, forever unavengable.” 


   “3 RMS Good View”
by Karen Haber
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, mid-Dec 1990

When a lawyer from the future decides to rent an apartment in 1968 San Francisco, she must first sign your standard temporal noninterference contract—yeah, like that one ever holds up in court!

 Dont change the past or the past will change you. The time laws. You lawyers understand this kind of thing. You, and you alone, are responsible for any dislocation of past events, persons or things, et cetera et cetera. Read the small print and sign. 




   “Robot Visions”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1991

A team of Temporalists send robot RG-32 200 years into the future where it seems to almost all that mankind is doing better than expected on Earth and in space.

 RG-32 was a rather old-fashioned robot, eminently replaceable. He could observe and report, perhaps without quite the ingenuity and penetration of a human being—but well enough. He would be without fear, intent only on following orders, and he could be expected to tell the truth. 




  Reggie Rivers #2
“The Big Splash”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1992

Just what caused the dinosaurs’ extinction?

 The scientists had been arguing for half a century over the nature of the K-T Event. Some said a comet or a planetoid hit the Earth; others, that one or more of those big super-volcanoes, like the one that mad your Yellowstone Park, cut loose with an eruption that blanketed the Earth with ash and smoke. 




  Reggie Rivers #3
“The Synthetic Barbarian”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1992

Clifton Standish’s motivation for travel to the Mesozoic is not entirely what it seems.

 One day this bloke Standish came in with his friend Hofmann, saying they wanted a time safari to cave-man days, to shoot dinosaurs the way our ancestors used to do. 




  Reggie Rivers #5
“The Satanic Illusion”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1992

Murder most foul when religious fundamentalists plan a time safari to disprove the theory of evolution.

 It will demonstrate that all these prehistoric beasts, whereof your clients bring home heads, hides, and photographs, did not live in succession, but all at the same time. 


   “The Girl with Some Kind of Past.
And George.”

by William Tenn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1993

A pretty, young time traveler from the future visits the most fascinating person she can think of in the past—that would be playboy George Rice, coincidentally her great-great-grandfather—but she won’t tell George what makes him so fascinating.

 That left the incest angle, and I asked him about that. He says that making it with your great-great-granddaughter from the twenty-first century is not much different from making it with your clothes-designer neighbor from across the hall. 




   The Silurian Tales
by Steven Utley
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1993

I’ve read ten of Utley’s stories of an expedition plopped into the Silurian geologic period, the most recent of which, “The End in Eden,” tells the tale of customs agents Phil Morrow and Sal Shelton, living at the border between the Silurian period and the present, matching wits with NCIS and JAG officers over a case of possible smuggling of Paleolithic biological specimens.
  1. There and Then (Nov 1993) Asimovs
  2. The Age of Mud and Slime (Mar 1996) Asimovs
  3. A Silurian Tale (May 1996) Asimovs
  4. The Wind Over the World (Oct/Nov 1996) Asimovs
  5. The Real World (30 Aug 2000) Sci Fiction
  6. Chain of Life (Oct/Nov 2000) Asimovs
  7. The Despoblado (22 Nov 2000) Sci Fiction
  8. Cloud by Van Gogh (Dec 2000) F&SF
  9. Half a Loaf (Jan 2001) Asimovs
  10. Five Miles from Pavement (21 Mar 2001) Sci Fiction
  11. The World Without (Jul 2001) Asimovs
  12. Walking in Circles (Jan 2002) Asimovs
  13. Treading the Maze (Feb 2002) Asimovs
  14. Foodstuff (Feb 2002) F&SF
  15. Beyond the Sea (29 Aug 2002) Revolution SF
  16. Exile (Aug 2003) Asimovs
  17. Chaos and Gods (18 Aug 2003) Revolution SF
  18. Invisible Kingdoms (Feb 2004) F&SF
  19. Babel (Mar 2004) Analog
  20. Another Continuum Heard From! (2 Apr 2004)   Revolution SF
  21. A Paleozoic Palimpsest (Oct 2004) F&SF
  22. The Wave-Function Collapse (Mar 2005) Asimovs
  23. Promised Land (Jul 2005) F&SF
  24. Silv’ry Moon (Oct/Nov 2005) F&SF
  25. Diluvium (May 2006) F&SF
  26. All of Creation (18 Jan 2008) Cosmos
  27. The World Within the World (Mar 2008) Asimovs
  28. The 400-Million-Year Itch (Apr 2008) F&SF
  29. Variant (Summer 2008) Postscripts
  30. The Woman Under the World (Jul 2008) Asimovs
  31. Slug Hell (Sep 2008) Asimovs
  32. Lost Places of Earth (Jan 2009) in We Think, Therefore We Are
  33. The Tortoise Grows Elate (Mar/Apr 2012) F&SF
  34. The End in Eden (Oct 2012) Analog
  35. The Gift Horse (Fall 2012) in The 400-Million-Year Itch
  36. Sidestep (Spring 2013) in Invisible Kingdoms

 Wheres he going to run to? Home is four hundred million miles away. 

—The End in Eden


   “Time Travelers Never Die”
by Jack McDevitt
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1996

Dave Dryden and his pal Shel have a great life traveling through time, visiting with Napolean and DaVinci, until Shel dies. Or does he?

I was lucky enough to meet Jack McDevitt at Jim Gunn’s workshop in Lawrence. He was always encouraging, kind, insightful and upbeat—for me, the best of the resident writers at the workshop.

 Time travel should not be possible in a rational universe. 






   The Company Stories
by Kage Baker and Kathleen Bartholomew
First story: Asimov’s, Mar 1997

I’ve read five of Kage Baker’s highly acclaimed stories about a group of entrepreneurial time travelers from the 24th century, the first of which was “Noble Mold” in Mar 1977. Of those, my favorite was “The Likely Lad” about young Alec Checkerfield, abandoned by his blue-blood parents to be raised by the hired help; he longs for adventure on the high seas, which he does obtain—but to be honest, I didn’t think it was via time travel. (Perhaps none of the five Checkerfield stories have time travel, even though isfdb indicates that they’re set in the Company Universe; I shall have to read “The Likely Lad” again!).

In 2012, the first of the Company stories co-authored with Kathleen Bartholomew appeared.

 For a while I lived in this little town by the sea. Boy, it was a soft job. Santa Barbara had become civilized by then: no more Indian rebellions, no more pirates storming up the beach, nearly all the grizzly bears gone. Once in a while some bureaucrat from Mexico City would raise hell with us, but by and large the days of the old Missions were declining into forlorn shades, waiting for the Yankees to come. 






   The Justin Counting Stories
by Harry Turtledove
First story: Asimov’s and Analog, Dec 1999

At twenty-one, Justin Kloster has it made: one more year of college and then happily ever after with his sweetheart Megan. Then his forty-year-old self shows up to prevent Justin from making terrible mistakes that will lead to an eventual nasty divorce with Megan.

Turtledove tells the story twice: Once from the POV of Justin-21 (“Twenty-One, Counting Up”) and once from the POV of Justin-40 (“Forty, Counting Down”). I loved this technique when Orson Scott Card used in Ender’s Shadow, but for me, it fell flat with Justin, perhaps because the stories didn’t add much to each other.

 I was stupid. I didnt know enough. I didnt know how to take care of her. 




   “Veritas”
by Robert Reed
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 2002

Jonathon Colfax, Emperor of the Roman Empire, tells the story of his travel back from the 21st century and the intrigues of his rise to power.

Robert Reed is my favorite prolific short story author from around the turn of the millennium.

 What we should do is gather up a group of people, and train them, and then travel back in time and conquer the Roman Empire. 


   “At Dorado”
by Geoffrey A. Landis
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2002

Cheena’s husband comes back to the port around the wormhole—dead, though the death is in the future, and she doesn’t bother to tell him.

 The wormholes were the ports very reason for existing, the center of Cheenas universe. 


   “Legions in Time”
by Michael Swanwick
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 2003

Ellie Voigt’s job is to sit and watch a door, until one day she gets angry enough at Mr. Tarblecko that she steps through the door into a time war.

 One man with a sunstroker can be overwhelmed by savages equipped with nothing more than neutron bombs—if there are enough of them, and they dont mind dying! 


   “The Chop Line”
by Stephen Baxter
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2003

In the future wars between man and Xeelee, Ensign Daxx meets the time-traveling future Captain Dakk who must try the younger Dakk for the future crime of disobeying orders in a combat situation.

 I dont know many captains, but she immediately recognized me. 


   “The Hat Thing”
by Matthew Hughes
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 2004

A nameless man tells another how to spot time travelers.

 Sure. Researchers. Tourists. Criminals altering their present by manipulating the past. Religious pilgrims. Collectors. Who knows what motivates people a million years from now? 


   The Diving Universe Series
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2005

I haven’t followed all of the stories in Rusch’s Diving Universe, so I can’t tell you which of the stories and novels have a significant time-traveling aspect caused by the space-folding anacopa. But in “Becoming One with the Ghosts” (Asimovs, Oct/Nov 2010), the starship Ivoire gets folded 5000 years into the future. Later, while trying to shut down an anacapa drive gone bad in “Encounter on Starbase Kappa” (Asimovs, Oct/Nov 2013), Captain Jonathan “Coop” just might have a chance to return the ship and the crew to their own time.
  1. A. Diving into the Wreck (Dec 2005) Asimovs
  2. B. Room of Lost Souls (Apr/May 2008) Asimovs
  3. The Spires of Denon (Apr/May 2009) Asimovs
  4. Diving into the Wreck (Nov 2009) includes parts of A and B
  5. Becoming One with the Ghosts (Oct/Nov 2010) Asimovs
  6. Becalmed (Apr/May 2011) Asimovs
  7. City of Ruins (May 2011)
  8. Stealth (Oct/Nov 2011) Asimovs
  9. The Spires of Denon (Apr/May 2009) Asimovs
  10. Boneyards (Jan 2012)
  11. Skirmishes (Apr 2013)
  12. Strangers at the Room of Lost Souls (May 2013) Asimovs
  13. The Application of Hope (Aug 2013) Asimovs
  14. Encounter on Starbase Kappa (Oct/Nov 2013) Asimovs
  15. The Runabout (May/Jun 2017) Asimovs

 Later, he learned that the anacapa malfunctioned, buringing him and his crew five thousand years into their future. 


   “Inside the Box”
by Edward M. Lerner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 2008

After foiling a murder attempt by his time-traveling grandson, Professor Thaddeus Fitch tries to explain Schrödinger’s cat to his class of undergraduates.

 Some assert that the realm of quantum mechanics is so removed from the realm of our senses were unequipped to judge. 




   “Nix Nix”
by Paul E. Holt
First publication: Aoife’s Kiss, Sep 2009

Sra and Cork travel from five centuries in the future back to 1963 where they hope to be the first to succeed in actually changing history for the better despite the Fillagian principle. Ah, you think, must be presidential history that they’ve set their hearts on, and you wouldn’t be entirely wrong.

And speaking of long periods of time, more than a quarter century passed between this Paul Holt time-travel story and his previous one in a 1983 issue of Asimov’s, which is a feat that deserves high congratulations!

 She was strectched out on one of the deck chairs on the balcony of their apartment. They had rented it temporarily until they could cash in a few more diamonds, pretty much worthless in their own time but extremely valuable here, and buy a house. They were rich of course. Why would they come back poor?

Cork was standing at the railing pointing at his bell bottoms. “People are looking at me funny,” he said. “Nobody else is wearing these.” Their pre-migration research indicated people did, but they could have been a couple of years off.
 


The story also appeared in this 2012 collection.   “The Battle of Little Big Science”
by Pamela Rentz
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 2010

A council of Native American elders has been funding Agnes Wilder’s project to view the past, but now they’re ready to cancel the shoestring budget because they haven’t yet seen a demonstration of the technology.

 When can you make the machine work? 


   “Superluminosity”
by Alan Wall
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 2010

After Jack Reynolds, a historical phenomenologist, has an affair, Fiona demands that he use the time machine he stole from a shut-down program to retrieve a fancy handbag from the early 1900s.

 Prove it then. Prove it by doing something for me. Something special. 


   “Backlash”
by Nancy Fulda
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 2010

Counter-terrorist agent Eugene Gutierrez, who suffers from flashbacks of his wife’s death, is contacted by a young time-travel agent from his own future with a plea to stop Gutierrez’s own daughter from setting off a chain of terrorist events.

 It is possible to create a set of coherent relationships between individual tachyons, similar to quantum entanglement. 


The story also appeared in Jonathan Strahan’s best-of-the-year anthology.   “Names for Water”
by Kij Johnson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2010

I didn’t understand this poetic story of a failing engineering student, Hala, who imagines that a phone call of white noise is many different things, one of which is a call from the future—but I am delighted by the mastery of language by my former teacher at the University of Kansas Center for the Study of Science fiction. She and I also had a perfect day climbing in the western foothills of the Cascade Mountains.

 It is the future. 


   “The Termite Queen of Tallulah County”
by Felicity Shoulders
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2010

When Lacey Tidwell’s dad has an attack that leaves him unable to communicate, she completely takes over the family exterminator business including the occassional time-travel trip to delete the origins of various bug problems. I enjoyed the story, but was annoyed that Shoulders brings up the paradoxes without offering any solution.

 Termite Trouble? You Can Turn Back Time! 


   “Uncle E”
by Carol Emshwiller
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2010

Twelve-year-old Sarah decides to keep her mother’s death quiet so that the kids can all stay together, but somehow the previously unknown Uncle E gets wind of the happening.

 We have a hard time getting to sleep—except for Elliot. 


   “The Messenger”
by Bruce McAllister
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 2011

Fifty-year-old Tim goes back to the time before he was born with two important questions for the woman who would become his mother.

 If you actually wanted to change things—say, to tell your mother lies about your father so shed marry someone else, so you wouldnt be born because you hate your life in the present—you wouldnt be able to do it. 


The story also appeared in this 2012 anthology.   “Pug”
by Theodora Goss
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 2011

In the time of Napoleon, a sickly English girl discovers a dog in her garden, and the dog leads her through a door to other times and places.

 (Imagine our relief to learn of Waterloo.) 


   “We Were the Wonder Scouts”
by Will Ludwigsen
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 2011

As an old man, Harald recounts the days of 1928 when he was one of Mr. Fort’s original Wonder Scouts, seeking out the true explanations for inexplicable phenomena in the woods of upstate New York.

 At worst, well be absorbed into the super-consciousness, learning and seeing all knowledge at once in a single stupendous flash. More likely, well find a tunnel to an underground civilization of pygmies or a portal through time. 


   “The Observation Post”
by Allen M. Steele
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 2011

In 1962, Ensign Floyd Moore is the communications officer for the blimp Centurion patrolling the Caribbean for Russian shipments of nuclear missles to Cuba. But what he and his lieutenant stumble upon on the larger Inagua island couldn’ possibly be Russian technology.

 The world was on the brink of nuclear war, and no one knew it yet. Almost no one that, is. 


from the Anderson Institute’s page on wormholes

   “Shadow Angel”
by Erick Melton
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 2011

No, I won’t vouch for this one having time travel, but it might—I just never fully understood what was happening to pilot Emil as he tries to steer(?) his dive-dreamship through a wormhole(?) while being haunted by his ex and being pulled back and forth by different possible futures vying for their existence.

 “There are several futures, Emil,” Real Haneul said. ”Each one is trying to reach back to shape the past so it can be.” 




   “This Petty Pace”
by Jason K. Chapman
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2011

Theoretical physicist Kyle Preston is getting garbled visitations from a hologramish future descendant who carries dire warnings, which Kyle wishes did more for him and his girlfriend Anna.

 Its like Schroedingers Subway Rider. Hes both here and twenty minutes away at the same time and you dont know which until he meets his girlfriend. 


An audio version of the story is available on
Escape Pod.


   “‘Run,’ Bakri Says”
by Ferrett Steinmetz
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2011

Irena is sent back in time to rescue her brother from a prison, all the time trusting that if things go fatally wrong, she’ll be rewound for another attempt.

 It was supposed to trigger a rewind when her heart stopped. If hed misconfigured it, Irenas consciousness would have died in an immutable present. 


   “Strawberry Birdies”
by Pamela Sargent
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2011

Maerleen Loegins travels back to the 1950s where she becomes a physics student and live-in help for a family where both parents are overwhelmed by young Addie, an even younger austistic Cyril, and two newborn twins.

 The reason her parents had put an ad in the paper offering free room and board and a small stipend to a college student was to have someone around to look after their children, especially Cyril, who wouldnt be ready to go to school that fall, not even to kindergarten, and might never be. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“The Most Important Thing in the World” by Steve Bein, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 2011 [no definitive time travel ]

   “Mrs. Hatcher’s Evaluation”
by James Van Pelt
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 2012

Perhaps you know how much I enjoy being deeply dragged into an engaging story, and then, only after some time, realizing that it’s a time travel story. If you haven’t yet read this story, then I apologize for depriving you of that pleasure. Now go read it now and find out about why Mrs. Hatcher’s teaching methods are indeed ”best practices.”

 What happened in Hatchers room? 


   “Living in the Eighties”
by David Ira Cleary
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr/May 2012

Living in Minneapolis, fifty-something Bob Marshall and his cult-band friend Clayton discover a website that can move them through time: Bob back to the eighties where he longs to save his long-dead girlfriend Gretchen from his younger self; Clayton to the future where he seeks a diabetes cure.

 “This web site, Bob,” he said to me, shaking the snow off his black beret, sitting down beside me at the bar, ”it’s a time travel site. Time travel?” 


Moe Berg

   Wilber’s Moe Berg Stories
by Rick Wilber
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr/May 2012

At the end of Wilber’s first Moe Berg story, Moe himself admits that he doesn’t know what’s going on, and I admit that I’m in the same boat—but I can tell you that that was the first story that I read in the Moe Berg subgenre of time travel stories. In this case, Red Sox catcher Moe Berg travels (as he did in real life) to Zurich with the mission to kill Heisenberg, but this is only one of many Moe Berg lives; in many of those lives he interacts with a beautiful young woman and seeming time-travel agent who only sometimes encourages him to kill Heisenberg. You can also read about Moe in one other of Wilber’s alternate history stories and at least one independently conceived story by Kristine Kathryn Rusch.
  1. Something Real (Apr/May 2012) Asimovs
  2. At Palomar (Jul 2013) Asimovs

 But I have to admit Im not real sure whats going on here. 


   “The Widdershins Clock”
by Kali Wallace
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 2012

I didnt understand the significance of the title clock in this story story told from the point of view of Marta who could have been a brilliant mathematician, but such was not allowed in 1950s America, so instead we hear of Marta’s grandmother’s clock and a search for the missing grandmother, meeting (along the way) at least one old woman who seems out of time.

 Grandma and I have a theory about how John Carter found his way to Mars. We think we can explain it with Schrödingers equation. 


   “Zip”
by Streven Utley
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 2012

Three time travelers—Chernikowski, Plant, and the narrator—keep going further and further back in time to escape the wave of destruction that’s seemingly following their time machine.

 I do not have to be a physicist, and I certainly am not one, to recall Einsteins words: “The distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubborn, persistent illusion.” 


   “The Mongolian Book of the Dead”
by Alan Smale
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2012

When the Chinese invade Mongolia, a wandering American named Tanner is taken by four Mongols because he has a critical role to play for Khulan and her shaman sister Dzoldzaya.

 To her all times are one, all distances are one. 




   The Time Portal Stories
by David Erik Nelson
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 2013

In the first story, Taylor, the orientation guy from HR in a fabrication company tells us how his company brings in workers from other times because they’re cheaper than contemporary labor.

In the fun second story, Travis, an HR man for the company that imports laborers from other times, begins recruiting radicals throughout time—such as Suze and her gang in 1995 Nebraska—but he and Suze soon discover that avoiding The Sound of Thunder is more difficult than killing Hitler.
  1. The New Guys Always Work Overtime (Feb 2013) Asimovs
  2. There Was No Sound of Thunder (Jun 2014) Asimovs
  3. Where There Is Nothing, There Is God (Dec 2016) Asimovs

 Anyway, we tried, me and Deke. I personally tried four different times. But Hitler is a really charismatic baby. 




   “Uncertainty”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 2013

For me, the main story of time-travel agent Leah wandering from one World War II encounter with Heisenberg to another did not have a clear notion of time travel, and the ties to the uncertainty principle were not germaine to the story. The exposition of the uncertainty principle itself was also confused, conflating it with the observer effect and not correctly representing the fact that a particle cannot simultaneously possess both a sharply localized position and a sharply localized momentum. On the other hand, I did enjoy the opening scene with Moe Berg, and the mix-ups are partly from his layman’s point-of-view.

 Werner Heisenbergs controversial uncertainty principle was one of the cornerstones of quantum physics. Heisenberg postulated that it was possible to know a particles position or that it was possible to know how fast the particle moved, but no one could know both the position and movement of the particle at the same time. Berg had spent quite a bit of time in Oxford, talking with leading scientists as he prepared for this job, and one of them used a description that moved away from particles into theory, which Berg appreciated. That scientist had told Berg that at its core, Heisenbergs principle meant this: The act of observing changes the thing being observed. 


   “The Wall”
by Naomi Kritzer
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr/May 2013

In 1989, a college freshman named Meghan receives a visit from her future self who encourages her to investigate the fall of the Berlin Wall later that year.

 Im you. You from the future. 


   “The Time Travel Club”
by Charlie Jane Anders
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2013

At Lydia’s second time at the Time Travel Club, she tells them of her pirate activities in the past and her solar sail demolition races in the future, which is all well and good until the outlandish Madame Alberta shows up and asks them all to help her with ethical questions of building a real time machine, not to mention figuring out a rather strange use for the thing.

 They already have warrantless wiretaps and indefinite detention. Imagine if they could go back in time and spy on you in the past. Or kill people as little children. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“The Golden Age of Story by Robert Reed, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 2013 [despite title, no time travel ]

“No Others Are Genuine by Greg Frost, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2013 [no definite time travel ]

   “The Carl Paradox”
by Steve Rasnic Tem
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan 2014

Future Carl informs Carl that the life he’s leading is the only one that’s insignificant enough that no paradox or disaster can possibly occur as a result of his time travel.

 The only difference, apparently, is the major dressing used on a roast beef club sandwich at a place called Garalfalos. 


   “Drink in a Small Town”
by Peter Wood
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 2014

A down-on-his-luck physicist who’s invented a faster-than-light drive stops to watch the first manned Mars landing in a small-town Georgia diner. This is one of the few stories I’ve seen that ties together ftl with time travel.

 And youll discover something else when youre tinkering with that drive. 


I don’t like to use the same cover illustration twice, so here’s an interior illustration for a poem in the March 2014 Asimov’s.   “Through Portal”
by Dominica Phetteplace
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 2014

During a picnic on a planet under study, eight-year-old Emmy wanders away and through a portal that is only partly a time machine.

 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, . . . 


   “Sidewalk at 12:10 P.M.”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 2014

Sarah, now living on Mars at age 110, uses new technology to revisit the day when she thought life couldn’t possibly be worth living. Be sure to take the quote below with a grain of salt.

 No. No travel is involved. A user cannot affect anything that has happened, ever. All the Chrono does is show on a screen what is already there, was there, will always be there. 


   “How Do I Get to Last Summer from Here?”
by M. Bennardo
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, July 2014

This story has a method of time travel that’s remniscent of that in Janet’s favorite time travel novel, Time and Again by Jack Finney, but it’s also tied in with the time in your life that you most long for.

 You cant go back there, no matter how much you pay. 


   “Of All Possible Worlds”
by Jay O’Connell
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 2014

When Costas Regas bonds with his 90-year-old landlord, Mr. Hieronymus, and discovers that the old man is editing the 20th century, that’s a fairly cool idea on its own, even without the possible smidgen of backward time travel that occurs when Costas writes poetry.

 Contained within the poem was a way to close a loop of time, pinch it off, and discard it. Id broken time. 




The Cloisters
   “The Cloisters”
by Jeff Grimshaw
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2014

I freely admit that I don’t take to dreamlike stories, but Grimshaw’s 15-minute surreal read about a jilted man who wanders through the Cloisters with a cute pony-tailed guard drew me in; and I’m sure it would have done so even if the space-bending tunnels that connected the medieval gardens to sundry places throughout New York hadn’t also connected to sundry times.

 Actually it wasnt cool, but I threw the scarf around my neck and headed for the Cloisters, inertia being my guiding principle. 


   “Videoville”
by Christopher East
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2014

In late 1986, geek Tim Stanek (he prefers the term “nerd”) and his high-school buddy Louis are approached one night by an unheard-of sort of person: a sensitive and inclusive football jock who asks them to come with him on a mission that needs their particular kind of resourcefulness.

 AAPL, AMZN, GOOG, NFLX 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Schools of Clay” by Derek Künsken, Asimov’s, Feb 2014 [time dilation ]

   “Pollen from a Future Harvest”
by Derek Künsken
First publication: Asimov's Science Fiction, Jul 2015

A breeze of pollen from intelligent alien vegetation continually blows into one artificial wormhole and out another eleven years earlier, which gets Major Okonkwo’s government het up about using it to repeatedly send back research results while Okonkwo and her team try to figure out how and where the rival government is spying on things and why the pollen stream has stopped. All the while, there are discussions of how careful everyone must be to avoid grandfather paradoxes.

For me, Künsken’s earlier novella of aliens and time dilation (“Schools of Clay”) was a realistic, character-driven, multi-layered story worthy of a Hugo, but this second novella was less engaging, even though it does involve actual time travel.

 On their way, the Force had discovered the time gates, a pair of artificial wormholes connected across eleven years of time. All the ancient wormholes were incalcuably valuable; their possession was the defining feature of the patron nations. Finding a wormhole was the Unions chance to slip from beneath the yoke of the Congregate. 


   “The First Step”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 2015

Divorced, workaholic professor Harvey DeLeo’s time machine is finally ready to test on a human, and against everyone’s advice he himself takes that first journey back to a time when he was still married to his beautiful wife and their son was but a toddler.

 This day, the next hour, were the reasons he had built the device. Not so that graduate students in religion could travel back to Christs cruxifixion to see if it really happened as the Bible said. Not so that historians could add to their dissertations by actually speaking to Thomas Jefferson. Not so that techs could fruitlessly try to modify the device so that someone could finally shoot Hitler. 


   “Searching for Commander Parsec”
by Peter Wood
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 2015

Young Brian, who lives with his mother and idolizes his deadbeat father, listens to a long-gone, space opera radio show that’s still being picked up on his boombox—but it’s more than the radio signals that are time traveling!

 This Commander Parsec show is pretty ridiculous. The commander is always rescuing bimbos and defeating the bad guys all over the Galaxy. 


   “The Citidel of Weeping Pearls”
by Aliette de Bodard
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2015

Amidst royal intrigue and miltary escalation, in a place far from Earth and a time thirty years after a princess and heir to the throne vanished along with the citadel where she lived, the disappearance still occupies the minds of an ensemble of people, One of that ensemble, Diem Huong, was a girl when the citadel stole her mother away, but now Diem Huong is an engineer on a project which is determined to travel back those thirty years.

 Mother had gone on ahead, Ancesters only knew where. So there was no way forward. But somewhere in the starlit hours of the past—somewhere in the days when the Citadel still existed, and Bright Princess Ngoc Minhs quarrel with the empress was still fresh and raw—Mother was still alive.
There was a way
back. 


the actual Hollywood 10 and their families in 1950   “Hollywood after 10”
by Thomas Esaias
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2015

In the post-Chronarch civilization, groups of wealthy time travelers entusiastically take on causes in the past, such as making sure of a successful Norman Mailer fund-raising party to support the convicted Hollywood 10 in the McCarthey era.

 A child doesnt fully mature until it self-consciously overcomes the mistakes its parents and its community made in raising it. What we are doing is saying to our ancestors, ‘Here and here you were wrong. We refuse to accept these errors. We are taking command of our own history.’ This is part of the maturing of human culture. 


I wish Asimov’s still had interior images: perhaps they could have used this lovely selkie from selinafenech.com.   “Walking to Boston”
by Rick Wilber
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2015

At the outset of World War II, Young Harry Mack is flying a bomber to Europe for the lend-lease program. The plane malfunctions and is heading for a crash-landing on the coast of neutral Ireland when an equally young Niamh calls to her selkie sisters of the sea to save the plane’s occupants. Even at the time, Niamh knows there will be a cost for their aid, but that cost isn’t revealed until the end of a long marriage between the two when Niamh, now suffering from dementia, and an aging Harry, regretful of his philandering life, take a time-travel-infused road trip.

 Will this whole dream last through all that drive and any time after they get there? Is he losing it, maybe, the way Niamh is? Are they both lying in a mortuary somewhere, dead and cold, and this is some kind of afterlife? Has time been changed somehow, so he can do better for her this time around? Jesus, would that even work? Could he be better. do better, given the chance? 


   “Flight from the Ages”
by Derek Künsken
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May/Jun 2016

In a mind-bending story with vast ideas on every page bang, the artificial intelligence Ulixes-316 starts as a financial agent for a galaxy-spanning bank in which he and Poluphemos witness (or cause?) an explosion that sets off a wavefront that’s collapsing space time at an ever expanding rate. With this as background, time travel plays both a minor role in a light-years-wide tachyon-based computing network and the key role in how a degenerating Ulixes can take care of his damaged companion Poluphemos and take an ethically questionable step that involves rewriting the Big Bang.

 Correct, little algorithm, but we are not in your present. We transmitted ourselves by tachyons into the past, back into the stelliferous period, to one of the first galaxies. We have been working here in the morning of the Universe for twelve million years. 




   “Toppers”
by Jason Sanford
First publication: Asimo’s Science Fiction, Aug 2016

Hanger-girl and other lost souls live in a future New York City of crumbling buildings and a ground-level mist that will take you if you let it. The way all this came about involves a researcher who tried to open tiny doors through time.

 The mists are time itself, or at least time as it exists here. 




   “Academic Circles”
by Peter Wood
First publication: Asimov's Science Ficton, Sep 2016

Kate Warner, assistant professor of English, doesn’t see how that dimwitted Marzano could have submitted her paper on The Man in the High Castle to The Hoboken Literary Journal 18 months before she even started writing it.

Wood creates some likeable characters, but there is no consistency in his model of time travel.

 You have a time machine and youre not doing anything important or helping anyone. All youre doing messing with me. 




   “When Grandfather Returns”
by Sharon N. Farber (as by S.N. Dyer)
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2016

In the times of the conquistadors, young Thunder Cries is such a hellion that his parents eventually give him over to the spirits to raise.

 When all was quiet, he walked into the future in his dreams. He saw these Turtle Men at a village like his mother's, perhaps his mother's village. All villages met the same fate. 




   “How the Damned Live On”
by James Sallis
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2016

A island castaway discusses life with a spider named Mmdhf who understands time as a single whole that has already been written.

 The closest I can come to the giant spiders name is Mmdhf. She loves to talk philosophy. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Rats Dream of the Future” by Paul McAuley, Asimov’s, Jun 2016 [predictions ]



   “Still Life with Abyss”
by Jim Grimsley
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan/Feb 2017

Teams of researchers from a nebulous future observe branching timelines in their past, with a particular fascination for the one man who has never made a choice that forked off a new line.

 Hes a human freak as far as Im concerned. Whatever I think of him, it doesnt affect my work. 




   “Other Worlds and This One”
by Cadwell Turnbull
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul/Aug 2017

In his universe, where the narrator lives with his difficult brother and mother, he had no ability to travel to other times and places, but he can visit pretty much any time or place (especially places with Hugh Everett) in any of the other myriad universes from the vast multiverse which are all fixed in stone.

 What I cant do is change anything. I cant change the course of history. I cant make it so that things work out. Every universe exists complete from the start. Its all already happened. 


   “An Incident in the Literary Life of Nathan Arkwright”
by Allen M. Steele
First publication: Asimov's Science Fiction, Sep/Oct 2017

Nathan Arkwright, one of the big four of golden-age science fiction writers, is considering whether there's any point to continuing with his Galaxy Patrol series when he gets invited out to dinner by an odd couple with a brand new car.

 Your novels are popular now, but in time your work will become even more esteemed . . . more valuable . . . than you can ever know. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“After the Atrocity” by Ian Creasey, Asimov’s, Mar/Apr 2017 [clones ]

“Kitty Hawk” by Alan Smale, Asimov’s, Mar/Apr 2017 [despite title, no time travel ]

“A Singular Event in the Fourth Dimension” by Andrea M. Pawley, Asimov’s, Mar/Apr 2017 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Tao Zero” by Damien Broderick, Asimov’s, Mar/Apr 2017 [despite title, no time travel ]

“The Wisdom of the Group” by Ian R. MacLeod, Asimov’s, Mar/Apr 2017 [predictions ]

“Triceratops” by Ian McHugh, Asimov’s, May/Jun 2017 [despite title, no time travel ]

 


157 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)