The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Written by Brian Aldiss
 from antiquity to 2016

   “The Failed Men”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Science Fantasy, May 1956

Surry Edmark, a 24th century volunteer on a humanitarian mission to save mankind from extinction some 360,000 centuries in the future, tells his story to a comforting young Chinese woman.

 You are the struback. 

[Apr 2014]
   “Poor Little Warrior!”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1958

You are reading an artsy story, told in the second-person, about a time traveler from AD 2181 who hunts a brontosaurus.

 Time for listening to the oracle is past; youre beyond the stage for omens, youre now headed in for the kill, yours or his; superstition has had its little day for today; from now on, only this windy nerve of yours, thius shakey conglomeration of muscle entangled untraceably beneath the sweat-shiny carapice of skin, this bloody little urge to slay the dragon, is going to answer all your orisons. 

[Dec 2013]
   “Man in His Time”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Science Fantasy, Apr 1965

Janet Westerman is trying to cope with the return of her husband Jack from a mission to Mars in which some aspect of the planet made it so that his sensory input now comes from 3.3077 minutes in the future.

 Dropping the letter, she held her head in her hands, closing her eyes as in the curved bone of her skull she heard all her possible courses of action jar together, future lifelines that annihilated each other. 

[Aug 2012]
   An Age
aka Cryptozoic!
by Brian Aldiss
First serialized in: New Worlds, Oct-Dec 1967

Once again, here’s an example that’s not time travel. Instead, an artist name Edward Bush (and others) “mind travel” to the Jurassic (and other ages) where they may view the past without physically traveling. Viewing the past is not time travel. Interestingly, though, the authoritarian government can’t seem to get their hands on the travelers while they’re traveling, so I am gonna count this as time travel.

 On his last mind into the Devonian, when this tragic illness was brewing, he had intercourse with a young woman called Ann. 

[May 2015]

Aldiss’s story was one of eight that were selected for the first (1969) of three separate paperback volumes that together comprised the original anthology.   “The Night That All Time Broke Out”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Dangerous Visions, Oct 1967

Aldiss confessed that this story contains one of the whackiest ideas that he ever had. Does it contain time travel? You should read the story first and decide for yourself, but here’s my spoil-laden take on the matter:

An invisible, subterranean gas can be supplied right to your house along with controls that let you control its delivery to your brain. Depending on the concentration, the result is to bring aspects of your previous consciousness (or that of your ancestors) right into your present-day brain: physical sensations, bodily abilities, mental attitudes, and the psychological make-up of the chanelled person all take over your body, although you remain present. To me, this could be ancestral memory—perhaps passed down genetically and triggered by the newly discovered gas—but I’m going to list it as time travel.

 Fifi could not understand what on earth he was talking about. Every since leaving Plymouth, she had been adrift, and that not entirely metaphorically. It was bad enough playing Pilgrim Mother to one of the Pilgrim Fathers, but she did not dig this New World at all. It was now beyond her comprehension to understand that the vast resources of modern technology were fouling up the whole time schedule of a planet. 

[Mar 2016]
   Frankenstein Unbound
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: 1973

When the weapons of war-torn 2020 open time slips that unpredictably mix places and times, grandfather Joe Boderland finds himself and his nuclear-powered car in 1816 Switzerland along with the seductive Mary Shelley, a maniacal Victor Frankenstein, and Frankenstein’s monster.

 You know, Joe, you are my first reader! A pity you don’t remember my book a little better! 

[Feb 2012]
interior art by George Barr   “The Small Stones of Tu Fu”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar/Apr 1978

A time traveler enjoys spending time with the aged poet Tu Fu in 770 A.D.

 Swimming strongly on my way back to what the sage called the remote future, my form began to flow and change according to time pressure. Sometimes my essence was like steam, sometimes like a mountain. 

[Feb 1978]
   “End Game”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Asimov`'s Science Fiction, 21 Dec 1981

Thing wonderous: a review that is palindromic. Yes, palindromic! Is that review a wonderous thing?

 Thunder. Distant sound.
Questions posed shake universes like constructs , like universes, shake posed questions, sound distant thunder.
 

[Nov 2015]
 

Additional Adventures (without Time Travel)

I often see potential time-travel stories that, alas, have no time travel. I track them, so that I don’t process these same chronotypical stories over and over in a time loop of my very own.
Written by Brian Aldiss
from antiquity to 2016

 These arent the droids youre looking for . . . move along. 


 1987
The Year Before Yesterday by Brian Aldiss [despite title, no time travel]


9 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)