The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Written by C.L. Moore
 from antiquity to 2017

   “Tryst in Time”
by C.L. Moore
First publication: Astounding, Dec 1936

Bold and bored soldier-of-fortune Eric Rosner meets a scientist who sends him skipping through time, always meeting the same beguiling girl with the smoke-blue eyes.

 I can transport you into the past, and you can create events there which never took place in the past we know—but the events are not new. They were ordained from the beginning, if you took that particular path. You are simply embarking upon a different path into a different future, a fixed and preordained future, yet one which will be strange to you because it lies outside your own layer of experience. So you have infinite freedom in all your actions, yet everything you can possibly do is already fixed in time. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Greater Than Gods” by C.L. Moore, Astounding, Jul 1939 [visions of possible futures ]

The story also appeared in Healy and McComas’s famous 1946 anthology, Adventures in Time and Space.

   “The Twonky”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1942

A dazed man (apparently dazed from running into a temporal snag) appears in a radio factory, whereupon (before returning to his own time) he makes a radio that’s actually a twonky which gets shipped to a Mr. Kerry Westerfield, who is initially quite confounded and amazed at all it can do.

Because of the opening, I’m convinced that this twonky is from the future, but the origin of the twonky in Archg Oboler’s 1953 movie is less certain.

 “Great Snell!” he gasped. “So that was it! I ran into a temporal snag!” 


Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, Master Travellers

Kuttner and Moore hold the distinction of being the recipients of the only joint Master Travellers award. It’s hard to pick which is their most unforgetable story: “The Twonky”? “Mimsy...”? “Vintage Season”? Nope. I’m nominating the lesser known “What You Need”!



The story also appeared in this 1952 collection.   “Time Locker”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Jan 1943

Once again, drunken genius Gallegher invents something without knowing that he has done so’this time, a box that swallows things up until they reappear at now + x.

 He was, Vanning reflected, an odd duck. Galloway was essentially amoral, thoroughly out of place in this too-complicated world. He seemed to watch, with a certain wry amusement, from a vantage point of his own, rather disinterested for the most part. And he made things— 




   “Mimsy Were the Borogoves”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1943

A scientist in the far future sends back two boxes of educational toys to test his time machine. One is discovered by Charles Dodgson’s niece in the 19th century, and the other by two children in 1942.

This story was in the first book that I got from the SF Book Club in the summer of 1970, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume 1 (edited by Robert Silverberg). I read and reread those stories until the book fell apart.

 Neither Paradine nor Jane guessed how much of an effect the contents of the time machine were having on the kids. 




   “Endowment Policy”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Aug 1943

A futuristic old man asks the taxi dispatcher for Denny Holt’s cab by name. When the man gets in the cab, he offers Denny $1000 to protect him from pursuit for the night and to steal a brown notebook with a secret formula for the War Department.

 Now, shielding the bills with his body, he took them out for a closer examination. They looked all right. They werent counterfeit; the serial numbers were O.K.; and they had the same odd musty smell Holt had noticed before.
“You must have been hoarding these,” he hazarded.
Smith said absently, “Theyve been on exhibit for sixty years—” He caught himself and drank rye.
 




   “Doorway into Time”
by C.L. Moore
First publication: Famous Fantastic Mysteries, Sep 1943

Treasures and beings from across time and space populate the halls of an age-old collector whose tiredness of life can be renewed only by the danger of the next hunt, which in this case means going naked and weaponless against Paul, defender of the lovely Alanna.

 On the wall before him, in the dimness of the room, a great circular screen looked out opaquely, waiting his touch. A doorway into time and space. A doorway to beauty and deadly peril and everything that made livable for him a life which had perhaps gone on too long already. 


   “What You Need”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lewis Padgett)
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1945

Reporter Tim Carmichael visits Peter Talley, a shopkeeper on Park Avenue who provides for a select clientele things that they will need in the future.

I never include prescience stories in my list, but like Heinlein’s “Life-Line,” this one is an exception, both because of its tone and because it was made into episodes of both Tales of Tomorrow (the tv show) and The Twilight Zone.

   




   “Vintage Season”
by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore (as by Lawrence O’Donnell)
First publication: Astounding, Sep 1946

More and more strange people are appearing each day in and around Oliver Wilson’s home; the explanation from the euphoric redhead leads him to believe they are time travelers gathering for an important event.

 Looking backward later, Oliver thought that in that moment, for the first time clearly, he began to suspect the truth. But he had no time to ponder it, for after the brief instant of enmity the three people from—elsewhere—began to speak all at once, as if in a belated attempt to cover something they did not want noticed. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
The Twonky by Henry Kuttner and C.L. Moore, 10 jun 1953 [no definite time travel ]

 


10 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)