The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Written by Damon Knight
 from antiquity to 2017



   “Don’t Live in the Past”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Galaxy, Jun 1951

A future transportation system goes awry, which results in flangs, tweedledums, collapsed flooring, argo paste, and mangels (yes, especially mangels) being delivered to the homes and business places of persons in a past century. Moreover, it’s quite possible that civilization down the line (including Bloggetts own time!) will be altered. When the buck finally stops, the buck-kickers have decided that it’s up to Ronald Mao Jean-Jacques von Hochbein Mazurin to travel back and set things right.

 The mathematicians are still working on that, Your Honor, and the best they can say now is that it was probably somewhere between the mid-Twentieth Century and the last Twenty-First. However there is a strong possibility that none of the material reached any enclosed space which would attract it, and that it may all have been dissipated harmlessly in the form of inconruent molecules. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Catch That Martian” by Damon Knight, Galaxy, Mar 1952 [nearby tenuous universes ]

   “Anachron”
by Damon Knight
First publication: If, Jan 1954

Brother Number One invents a machine that can extract things and place things in elsewhen, but only if the acts don’t interfere with free will; Brother Number Two tries to steal the machine.

 “By God and all the saints,” he said. “Time travel.”
    Harold snorted impatiently. “My dear Peter, ‘time’ is a meaningless word taken by itself, just as ‘space’ is.”
    “But barring that, time travel.”
    “If you like, yes.”
 




   “The Last Word”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Satellite Science Fiction, Feb 1957

A fallen angel, who himself cannot undo time, pushes mankind to the brink of extinction.

 Cowardice again—that man did not want to argue about the boundaries with his neighbors muscular cousin. Another lucky accident, and there you are. Geometry. 


   “Thing of Beauty”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Galaxy, Sep 1958

After a time-slip, con artist Gordon Fish receives nine packages containing a machine that makes magnificent drawings, but the instructions are in some unknown language.

 There was a time slip in Southern California at about one in the afternoon. Mr. Gordon Fish thought it was an earthquake. 


   “Time Enough”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Amazing, Jul 1960

Through the magic of time travel, young Jimmy has the opportunity to relive a traumatic moment with a group of other young boys at the quarry and change the outcome.

 Im a little tensed up, I guess, but I can do it. I wasnt really scared; it was the way it happened, so sudden. They never gave me a chance to get ready. 




   “Extempore”
aka “The Beach Where Time Began”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Far Out, 1961

Mr. Rossi yearns so much to travel through time that he manages to do so with only the power of his mind, but now he’s traveling is out of control: a series of moments past to present to future, which keep repeating but never the same.

 He found a secondhand copy of J.W. Dunnes An Experiment with Time and lost sleep for a week. He copied off the charts from it, Scotch-taped them to his wall; he wrote down his startling dreams every morning as soon as he awoke. There was a time outside time, Dunne said, in which to measure time; and a time outside that, in which to measure the time that measured time, and a time outside that. . . . Why not? 




   The Tree of Time
aka Beyond the Barrier
by Damon Knight
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1963—Jan 1964

Professor Gordon Naismith unexpectedly discovers that he’s a warrior Shefth from the future, and now the Uglies from the future wants him to return to kill an alien Zug who managed to get through the time barrier that’s meant to keep out the Zugs.

The full version, called Beyond the Barrier, was published shortly after the shortened two-part serial (about 45,000 words) appeared in F&SF.

 Let us say there was a need to be inconspicuous. This is a dead period, for hundreds of years on either side. No one knows about this abandoned liner except us, and no one would think of looking here. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“I See You” by Damon Knight, F↦SF, Nov 1976 [viewing the past ]

   “Azimuth 1,2,3...”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1982

Shortly after genius Azimuth Backfiler (yes, that’s his real name) finds a way to travel back in time, Azimuth 2 appears and hands him next week’s newspaper causing some sort of feedback that create Azimuth 3, Azimuth 4, . . .

 Therefore, he was not surprised to see himself emerge from the chamber, wearing this very suit, a moment after he had formed the decision. 


 


10 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)