The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Written by Fredric Brown
 from antiquity to 2016

   “The Angelic Angleworm”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Unknown, Feb 1943

If Charlie Wills and you have patience, then Charlie will figure out what’s causing those strange occurrences (such as an angleworm turning into an angel) and you will figure out that angels can time travel.

 We can drop you anywhere in the continuum. 

[Aug 2011]

   “Paradox Lost”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Astounding, Oct 1943

During a philosophy lecture, the left hand of bored college student Shorty McCabe disappears, at which point Shorty figures he may as well follow whereever the hand went, which turns out to be into a time machine invented by the only kind of person who could invent such a thing—a crazy man.

 But a time machine is impossible. It is a paradox. Your professors will explain that a time machine cannot be, because it would mean that two things could occupy the same space at the same time. And a man could go back and kill himself when he was younger, and—oh, all sorts of stuff like that. Its completely impossible. Only a crazy man could— 

[Dec 2012]
   “Vengeance, Unlimited”
aka “Vengeance Fleet”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Super Science Stories, Jul 1950

After Venus is destroyed by an invading fleet, Earth and Mars end their dispute in order to put together a fleet that can travel back in time to extract vengeance on the invaders. I like Brown’s work a lot, but not this story which had gaping holes, not the least of which was a problem with the units of c raised to the c power (sorry, that is one of my pet peeves.

 In ten years, traveling forward in space and backward in time, the fleet would have traversed just that distance—186,334186,334 miles. 

[Jan 2014]
   “Hall of Mirrors”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Galaxy, Dec 1953

You have invented a time machine of sorts that can, at any time, replace yourself with an exact duplicate of your body—and mind—from any time in the past.

 They didnt use that style of furniture in Los Angeles—or anywhere else that you know of—in 1954. That thing over there in the corner—you cant even guess what it is. So might your grandfather, at your age, have looked at a television. 

[Jul 2011]
   “Experiment”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Galaxy, Feb 1954

Professor Johnson’s colleagues wonder what would happen if he refuses to send an object back to the past after it has already appeared there.

I haven’t found anything earlier that brings up this question, but although the resolution was clever, it didn’t satisfy me, and (though I could be wrong) I think Brown misses the fact that at one point there should be two copies of the object in existence at the same time. In any case, this was the first part of a pair of short-short stories in the Feb ’54 Galaxy, which together were called Two-Timer (the second of which had no time travel).

 What if, now that it has already appeared five minutes before you place it there, you should change your mind about doing so and not place it there at three o’clock? Wouldn’t there be a paradox of some sort involved? 

[Jan 2012]
   “Blood”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Feb 1955

A cute joke story about the last two vampires on Earth who flee into the future to escape persecution and simply search for a filling meal.

 I, a member of the dominant race, was once what you called . . . 

[Jul 2013]

   “First Time Machine”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Sep 1955

A short-short, 1950s version of the grandfather paradox with a resolution that’s not quite satisfying (branching universes, I think, but it’s unclear). The cover of the 1958 paperback is by Hieronymus Bosch (Grzegorz’s favorite painter) with an owl in the background (Grzegorz’s favorite bird)!

 What would have happened if youd rushed to the door and kicked yourself in the seat of the pants? 

[Aug 2011]
   “The End”
aka “Nightmare in Time”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: The Dude Magazine, May 1961

I like Fredric Brown and his creative mind, but this was just a gimmick short short time-travel story in which the gimmick didn’t gimme anything. Now, if he had used this gimmick and the story had actually parsed, that would have caught my attention.

  . . . run backward run . . . 

[Jul 2013]

   “Of Time and Eustace Weaver”
aka “The Short Happy Lives of Eustace Weaver”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Ellery Queen’ Mystery Magazine, Jun 1961

When the eponymous hero invents a time machine, he’s quite happy to embark on a career of larceny, gambling, and playing the market to make his riches, knowing that if things go awry, he can always return to the start.

When the story was reprinted in Nightmares and Geezenstacks it was presented as three separate vignettes (’The Short Happy Lives of Eustace Weaver, Parts I, II and III), but the original EQMM publication had just one entry (Of Time and Eustace Weaver) in its table of contents.

 He could become the richest man in the world, wealthy beyond the dreams of avarice. All he had to do was to take short trips into the future to learn what stocks had gone up and which horses had won races, then come back to the present and buy those stocks or bet on those horses. 

[Jul 2015]
 

Additional Adventures (without Time Travel)

I often see potential time-travel stories that, alas, have no time travel. I track them, so that I don’t process these same chronotypical stories over and over in a time loop of my very own.
Written by Fredric Brown
from antiquity to 2016

 These arent the droids youre looking for . . . move along. 


 1944
“The Yehudi Principle” by Fredric Brown [predictions]



 1949
What Mad Universe by Fredric Brown [parallel universes]


11 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)