The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Written by Jack Finney
 from antiquity to 2017



   “The Third Level”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Colliers, 7 Oct 1950

A New York man stumbles upon a third underground level at Grand Central Station which is a portal to the past.

This is the first of Finney’s many fine time-travel stories.

 I turned toward the ticket windows knowing that here—on the third level at Grand Central—I could buy tickets that would take Louisa and me anywhere in the United States we wanted to go. In the year 1894. 




   “Such Interesting Neighbors”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Colliers, 6 Jan 1951

Al Lewis and his wife Nell have new neighbors, an inventor who talks of time travel from the future and his wife Ann.

The story was the basis for the second episode of Science Fiction Theater and also Spielberg’s Amazing Stories.

 But Ann walked straight into that door and fell. I couldnt figure out how she came to do it; it was as though she expected the door to open by itself or something. Thats what Ted said, too, going over to help her up. “Be careful, honey,” he said, and laughed a little, making a joke of it. “Youll have to learn, you know, that doors wont open themselves.” 




   “Quit Zoomin’ Those Hands Through the Air”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Colliers, 4 Aug 1951

Grandpa is over 100 now, so surely his promise to General Grant no longer binds him to keep quiet about a time-travel expedition and a biplane.

 Air power in the Civil War? Well, its been a pretty well-kept secret all these years, but we had it. The Major and me invented it ourselves. 




   “I’m Scared”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Colliers, 15 Sep 1951

A retired man investigates scores of cases of the past impinging itself on the present and speculates about the cause and the eventual effect.

 Then, undressing in my bedroom, I remembered that Major Bowes was dead. Years had passed, half a decade, since that dry chuckle and familiar, “All right, all right,” had been heard in the nations living rooms. 




   “There Is a Tide”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Colliers, 2 Aug 1952

A sleepless man, struggling with a business decision, sees an earlier occupant of his apartment who is struggling with a decision of his own.

 I saw the ghost in my own living room, alone, between three and four in the morning, and I was there, wide awake, for a perfectly sound reason: I was worrying. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Of Missing Persons” by Jack Finney, Good Housekeeping, Mar 1955 [no definite time travel ]



   “Second Chance”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Good Housekeeping, Apr 1956

A college student lovingly restores a 1923 Jordan Playboy roadster—a restoration that takes him back in time.

 You cant drive into 1923 in a Jordan Playboy, along a four-lane superhighway; there are no superhighways in 1923. 




   “The Love Letter”
by Jack Finney
First publication: The Saturday Evening Post, 1 Aug 1959

A young man looking for love in 1959 Brooklyn finds and answers a letter from a young woman in 1869 Brooklyn.

 The folded paper opened stiffly, the crease permanent with age, and even before I saw the date I knew this letter was old. The handwriting was obviously feminine, and beautifully clear—its called Spencerian, isnt it?—the letters perfectly formed and very ornate, the capitals especially being a whirl of dainty curlicues. The ink was rust-black, the date at the top of the page was May 14, 1882, and reading it, I saw that it was a love letter. 




   “I Love Galesburg in the Springtime”
by Jack Finney
First publication: McCall’s, Apr 1960

Reporter Oscar Mannheim has many opportunities in his long life, but never wants to leave the midwest Galesburg that he grew up in—and neither do its many other citizens and artifacts of the past.

 Tomake sure, I walked over to a newsboy and glanced at the stack of papers at his feet. It was The World; and The World hadt been published for years. The lead story said something about President Cleveland. Ive found that front page since, in the Public Library files, and it was printed June 11, 1894. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“The Other Wife” by Jack Finney, The Saturday Evening Post, 30 Jan 1960 [alternate timelines ]
aka “The Coin Collector”

   “Where the Cluetts Are”
by Jack Finney
First publication: McCall

Ellie and Sam Cluett build a house that duplicates every fine detail of a house from Victorian times, and over time, the house gradually takes them back to that time.

 Were looking at a vanished sight. This is a commonplace sight of a world long gone and weve reached back and brought it to life again. Maybe we should have let it alone. 




   “Time Has No Boundaries”
aka “The Face in the Photo”
by Jack Finney
First publication: The Saturday Evening Post, 13 Oct 1962

Young physics Professor Weygand is questioned by Instructor Martin O. Ihren about the disappearance of several recent criminals who have shown up in very old photos.

 I did, and saw what he meant; a face in the old picture almost identical with the one in the Wanted poster. It had the same astonishing length, the broad chin seeming nearly as wide as the cheekbones, and I looked up at Ihren. “ Who is it? His father? His grandfather?” 




   “Double Take”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Playboy, Apr 1965

Jake Pelman is hopelessly in love with Jessica, the breathtaking star in a movie that he works on, but it takes a breathless trip to the 1920s for Jess to realize what her feelings for Jake might be.

 Out of the worlds three billion people there cant be more than, say, a hundred women like Jessica Maxwell. 




   Time and Again
by Jack Finney
First publication: 1970

Si goes back to 19th century New York to solve a crime and (of course) fall in love.

This is Janet’s favorite time-travel novel, in which Finney elaborates on themes that were set in earlier stories such as “Double Take.”

 Theres a project. A U.S. government project I guess youd have to call it. Secret, naturally; as what isnt in government these days? In my opinion, and that of a handful of others, its more important than all the nuclear, space-exploration, satellite, and rocket programs put together, though a hell of a lot smaller. I tell you right off that I cant even hint what the project is about. And believe me, youd never guess. 


   From Time to Time
by Jack Finney
First publication: Feb 1995

Finney’s sequel to Time and Again initially finds Si Morley living a happy life in the 19th century with his 19th century family, while The Project in the future never even got started because he prevented the inventor’s parents from ever meeting. But vague memories linger in some of the Project member’s minds, and Morley can’t stay put.

 Theyre back there in the past, trampling around, changing things, aren t they? They dont know it. Theyre just living their happy lives, but changing small events. Mostly trivial, with no important effects. But every once in a while the effect of some small changed event moves on down to the&mdash 


 


15 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)