The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Written by James Van Pelt
 from antiquity to 2017



   “What Weena Knew”
by James Van Pelt
First publication: Analog, Apr 2001

James Van Pelt kindly had coffee with me and signed a baseball for me at a Denver science fiction convention—oh, and he wrote (among other things) this fine story of Weena from the moment that H.G. Wells’s time traveller rescued her from the river.

I met the prolific and kind James Van Pelt at a convention in Denver, where we talked about one of his students who later came to Boulder to study computer science. I had misinterpreted a biography of Van Pelt in Analog as if it were an obituary, so I was happy to see the outstanding writer alive and willing to sign a baseball that I presented to him.

 Then a vice clamped her upper arm. A surge. A tremendous force, and she was clear of the stream. Air! There was air to breathe, but all she could do was cough. She was being carried. Her cheek rested on skin. Hough arms wrapped her close until they were on the bank. Gently, her rescuer put her down. Rock warmed her back; her hands lay flat in the heat, her head dropped onto the warmth. Against the sky stood a figure stragely shaped. Weenas vision swirled—she could barely focus—but before she passed out, she saw in wonder, he was a giant. 


   “Mrs. Hatcher’s Evaluation”
by James Van Pelt
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 2012

Perhaps you know how much I enjoy being deeply dragged into an engaging story, and then, only after some time, realizing that it’s a time travel story. If you haven’t yet read this story, then I apologize for depriving you of that pleasure. Now go read it now and find out about why Mrs. Hatcher’s teaching methods are indeed ”best practices.”

 What happened in Hatchers room? 




   “The Time Travel Device”
by James Van Pelt
First publication: Daily Science Fiction, 7 Feb 2013

One of my rules is that time travel must involve interaction, which this story—of a literary engineer visiting deaths of his literary heroes—might not have, but I like James Van Pelt enough that I wanted to list the story anyway (and mark my first visit to Daily Science Fiction).

 Time travel existed, but I could not interact with the past or the future. 


 


3 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)