The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 Written by John G. Hemry
 from antiquity to 2016

   “Crow’s Feat”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Nov 2000

Mid-list science fiction writer Paul Gallatin runs into scientist Ivan Ivanovich at a party, and the scientist offers to send Paul back to Shakespeare’s time.

 Tell me, how many copies do you think a book would sell if it proved your belief that Shakespeare was a fraud? 

[Sep 2012]
   “Small Moments in Time”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Dec 2004

A time traveler seeking lost seeds in the past finds a man who may have started the worst influenza of the 20th century.

 The odd truth of working as a temporal interventionist is that some there-and-thens are better than others. 

[Dec 2004]
   “Working on Borrowed Time”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Jun 2005

Tom and his implanted AI Jeannie (from “Small Moments in Time”) are back again, this time trying to stop future Nazis from destroying Edwardian London.

 What? The British Empire started coming apart in the 1920s? 

[Jul 2005]
   “These are the Times”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Nov 2011

Temporal Interventionish Tom and his implanted assistant Jeannie are at the start of the American Revolution, a decidedly TI-crowded time, when they run into Toms love interest Pam, another TI from Toms future who is trying to figure out who fired the first shot.

 The steath-suited TI leveled a weapon, then droped as a stun charge hit. Moments later the other TI weod fired the stun charge fell, then two more TIs appeared and took out whoever had nailed the second TI. But then the stealth-suited TI reappeared, having recovered somewhen in the future and jumped back to try to finish the job. 

[Dec 2007]
   “Joan”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Nov 2009

It’s comforting to know that when you open a science fiction story named “Joan,” your expectations will be met—as in this story of our heroine Kate, time travel, and Joan of Arc.

 I realize I may seem a little obsessive, but is it so wrong to wish I could have saved her from being burned? She was such a remarkable person and it was such a horrible fate. 

[Dec 2009]
   “Betty Knox and Dictionary Jones in the Mystery of the Missing Teenage Anachronisms”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Mar 2011

Ninety-year-old Jim Jones is sent back into his 15-year-old body in 1964 to help Betty Knox (who is already back in her 15-year-old body and doesn’t expect him) because all the time-travel agents (sent back to that time to avert the world’s toxin disasters) have disappeared with no discernable effect on history.

 And I know that after Johnson, Richard Nixon is elected president. Then comes Ford. Who comes next? 

[Oct 2012]
 


6 items are in the time-travel list for these search settings.
Thanks for visiting my time-travel page, and thanks to the many sources that provided stories and more (see the Links and Credits in the menu at the top). —Michael (
main@colorado.edu)