Time-Travel Fiction

  Storypilot’s Big List of Adventures in Time Travel



“Consider Her Ways”
by John Wyndham
First publication: Sometime, Never, 1956



An amnesiac woman, Jane Waterleigh, awakens in an all-female future world with four castes (mothers, doctors, servants and workers), and she can only assume she’s in a dream or hallucination where she finds herself in an enormous body whom the doctors and servants call “Mother Orchis.”

 Go to the ant, thou sluggard, consider her ways. 

[Jan 2013]

The Winds of Time
by Chad Oliver
First publication: 1956
Here’ another example of what’s not time travel: Aliens crashland on Earth and then sleep 15,000 years in hopes that mankind (in the form of Dr. Wes Chase, for the purposes of this story) will have developed space travel. But I wanted to include the story in my list anyway, because I enjoyed parts of it and because of the quote from Chapter 16, years before a certain other doctor took it to mind that all of Star Fleet should know he was a doctor, not a...

 I’m a doctor, not a space cadet. 

[Apr 2013]

“The Futile Flight of John Arthur Benn”
by Richard Wilson (as by Edward Halibut)
First publication: Infinity Science Fiction, Feb 1956
A man with a death wish wishes himself back in time.                                                                                

 Now, he thought, what? This was scarcely dinosaur country. 

[Jul 2013]

“The Message”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Feb 1956


Time traveler and historian George tries to travel back to World War II without making any changes to the world.

 George was deliriously happy. Two years of red tape and now he was finally back in the past. Now he could complete his paper on the social life of the foot soldier of World War II with some authentic details. 

[Jul 1976]



The Reggie Rivers Stories
by L. Sprague de Camp
First story: Galaxy, Mar 1956

Dinosaur hunters Reggie Rivers (no relation to the Denver Bronco) and his partner, the Raja, organize time-travel expeditions in a world with a Hawking-style chronological protection principle. The last of these stories is by Chris Bunch:

 A Gun for Dinosaur (Mar 1956)Galaxy
The Big Splash (Jun 1992)Asimovs
The Synthetic Barbarian (Sep 1992)Asimovs
Crocamander Quest (Oct 1992)The Ultimate Dinosaur
The Satanic Illusion (Nov 1992)Asimovs
The Cayuse (Jan 1993)Expanse
The Mislaid Mastodon (May 1993)Analog
Rivers of Time (Nov 1993)Rivers of Time
Pliocene Romance (Nov 1993)Rivers of Time
The Honeymood Dragon (Nov 1993)   Rivers of Time
Gun, Not for Dinosaur (Nov 1993)Rivers of Time

 Oh, Im no four-dimensional thinker; but, as I understand it, if people could go back to a more recent time, their actions would affect our own history, which would be a paradox or contradiction of facts. Cant have that in a well-run universe, you know. 
—from “A Gun for Dinosaur”

[Jul 2011]

“Second Chance”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Good Housekeeping, Apr 1956

A college student lovingly restores a 1923 Jordan Playboy roadster—a restoration that takes him back in time.

 You cant drive into 1923 in a Jordan Playboy, along a four-lane superhighway; there are no superhighways in 1923. 

[Mar 2005]

“The Failed Men”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Science Fantasy, May 1956

Surry Edmark, a 24th century volunteer on a humanitarian mission to save mankind from extinction some 360,000 centuries in the future, tells his story to a comforting young Chinese woman.

 You are the struback. 

[Apr 2014]

“The Man Who Came Early”
by Poul Anderson
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1956

An explosion throws Sergeant Gerald Robbins from the 1950s to about 990 AD Iceland where, dispite his advanced knowledge, he had trouble fitting in.

 Now, then. There is one point on which I must set you right. The end of the world is not coming in two years. This I know. 

[Jul 2011]

“Absolutely Inflexible”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Fantastic Universe, Jul 1956

Whenever one-way jumpers from the past show up, it’s up to Mahler to shuffle them off to the moon where they won’t present any danger of infection to the rest of humanity, but now Mahler is faced with a two-way jumper.

 Even a cold, a common cold, would wipe out millions now. Resistance to disease has simply vanished over the past two centuries; it isnt needed, with all diseases conquered. But you time-travelers show up loaded with potentialities for all the diseases the world used to have. And we cant risk having you stay here with them. 

[Apr 2012]

Classics Illustrated’s The Time Machine
adapted by Lou Cameron
First publication: Classics Illustrated 133, Jul 1956



This first comic book adaptation appeared in the month of my birth. Of course, as a self-respecting child of the ’50s and ’60s, I was never seen reading Classics Illustrated in public. Fortuntately, adults everywhere can now read the classic comic online.

 Then I drew a breath, set my teeth, gripped the starting lever with both hands and went off into time. 


“Backward, O Time”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Galaxy, Aug 1956
Through Larry Sullivan’s eyes, we watch as everyone in the 20th century experiences life flowing backwards. For me, the story was an interesting variation on time flowing backwards for just one person, but as a story, it didn’t gel.

 It all makes perfectly good sense in its own terms. Friction would be a factor to be subtracted from energy calculations, not added. And so on. The universe would be expanding; we'd heat our houses with furnaces instead of cooling them. Grass would grow out of seeds. And you would take food into your body and expel waste matter, instead of increting and exgesting as we do. 

[Jun 2015]

“Compounded Interest”
by Mack Reynolds
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1956

“Mr. Smith” shows up in 1300 A.D. to invest ten gold coins at 10% annual interest with Sior Marin Goldini’s firm, after which he shows up every 100 years to provide guidance.

 In one hundred years, at ten per cent compounded annually, your gold would be worth better than 700,000 zecchini. 

[Dec 2013]

The Door Into Summer
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct—Dec 1956


Inventor Dan Davis falls into bad company and wakes up 30 years later, but he gets an idea of how to put things right even at this late point.

 Denver in 1970 was a very quaint place with a fine old-fashioned flavor; I became very fond of it. It was nothing like the slick New Plan maze it had been (or would be) when I had arrived (or would arrive) there from Yuma; it still had less than two million people, there were still buses and other vehicular traffic in the streets—there were still streets; I had no trouble finding Colfax Avenue. 

[Aug 1968]

“Hopper”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Infinity Science Fiction, Oct 1956
I haven’t yet read this short story that Silverberg expanded to a novel in 1967, though perhaps some day I will spot the Ace Double paperback that packaged it along with four other stories and the short novel, The Seed of Earth.

The Stars My Destination
by Alfred Bestor
First publication: Galaxy, Oct 1956—Jan 1957


Even before I found Asimov and Heinlein and other books with space ships on the spine in the local library, I stole this paperback from my dad’s shelf aroudn 1964. As you can see from the picture, it had an irresistible cover (yes, that’s the stolen copy).

For the most part, Bestor’s story has jaunting (teleportation through space) with no time travel, which is enough to cause plenty of excitement for Gully Foyle (aka Geoffrey Fourmyle) as he jaunts around the war-torn solar system, seeking revenge on various space merchants. But at one climactic point, he also manages a jaunt through time.

 And then he was tumbling down, down, down the space-time lines, back into the dreadful pit of Now. 

[Jul 1963]

“Gimmicks Three”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Nov 1956


Isidore Wellby makes a timely pact with the devil’s demon.

 Ten years of anything you want, within reason, and then youre a demon. Youre one of us, with a new name of demonic potency, and many privileges beside. Youll hardly know youre damned. 

[Jul 1976]

“It Ends with a Flicker”
by William Tenn
First publication: Galaxy, Dec 1956
Max AlbenMac Albin is genetically predisposed to survive time travel, so he is the natural choice to go back in time and shift the course of a missle that shifted the course of history.

 Now! Now to make a halfway decent world! Max Alben pulled the little red switch toward him.

flick!

Now! Now to make a halfway interesting world! Mac Albin pulled the little red switch toward him.
flick!
 
[Apr 2012]

“The Last Word”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Satellite Science Fiction, Feb 1957

A fallen angel, who himself cannot undo time, pushes mankind to the brink of extinction.

 Cowardice again—that man did not want to argue about the boundaries with his neighbors muscular cousin. Another lucky accident, and there you are. Geometry. 

[Jun 2015]

“Blank!”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Infinity Science Fiction, Jun 1957



Dr. Edward Barron has a theory that time is arranged like a series of particles that can be traveled up or down; his colleague and hesitant collaborator August Pointdexter isn’t so sure about the application of the theory to reality.

 An elevator doesnt involve paradoxes. You cant move from the fifth floor to the fourth and kill your grandfather as a child. 

[Jul 1976]

“The Assassin”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Imaginative Tales, Jul 1957
Walter Bigelow has spent 20 years of his life building the Time Distorter that will allow him to go back to save Abraham Lincoln.

 The day passed. President Lincoln was to attend the Ford Theatre that night, to see a production of a play called “Our American Cousin.” 

[Apr 2014]

“A Loint of Paw”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1957


Master criminal Montie Stein has found a way around the statute of limitations.

 It introduced law to the fourth dimension. 

[Jul 1976]

CBS Radio Workshop
produced by William N. Robson and William Froug
First time travel: 15 Sep 1957



Perhaps it was Finney’s success in the 50s that encouraged the experimental CBS Radio Workshop to air their only time-travel fantasy in their penultimate episode, “Time Found Again” from a 1935 Mildrem Cram story. Earlier in the series, they did other science fiction including a musical version of Heinlein’s “The Green Hills of Earth,” Pohl and Kornbluth’s The Space Merchants, Huxley’s Brave New World, two Bradbury character sketches, and more.

 Bart: Do you think it’s possible for a person to go back in time?
George: Well, you know there is a theory that nothing is lost, nothing is destroyed.
Bart: Then you do believe it’s possible?
George: Anything is possible, Bart, to a degree. Science has proved that. It’s conceivable, with concentration and imagination, that a person might, for a moment, escape from the present into the past. 
—from “Time Found Again”

[Jan 2012]

“A Gun for Grandfather”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Future Science Fiction, Fall 1957
The para doesn’t quite dox for me, but the story is still enjoyable as Busby’s first publication.

 I’m not kidding you at all,” Barney insisted. “I have produced a workable Time Machine, and I am going to use it to go back and kill my grandfather. 

[Jun 2011]

“Sanctuary”
by William Tenn
First publication: Galaxy, Dec 1957
Henry Hancock Groppus seeks sanctuary from the Ambassador from the Next Century after he is condemned to death for proposing and practicing genetic selective breeding to solve the problems of the Uterine Plague.

 “The point being,” said the Secretary of State, “that most social values are conditioned by the time, place and prevailing political climate. Is that what you mean by perspective? 

[Apr 2012]

The Time Garden
by Edward Eager
First publication: 1958
A garden of thyme and a magic frog (aka the Natterjack) take four children to times past.

 What the Natterjack would have said, no one could tell, for no one had asked him. The Natterjack did not mind. He bided his time. He could wait. 

[Mar 2011]

The Time Traders Series
by Andre Norton
First book: 1958

Young Ross Murdoch, on the streets and getting by with petty crime and quick feet, gets nabbed and sent to a secret project near the north pole.

 The Time Traders (1958)Ross joins the project
Galactic Derelict (1959)prehistoric alien wreck
The Defiant Agents (Feb 1962)more Russians and aliens
Key Out of Time (Mar 1963)on the planet Hawaika
Firehand, with P.M. Griffin (Jun 1964)vs murderous aliens
Echoes in Time, with Sherwood Smith (Nov 1999)alien Rosetta stone
Atlantis Endgame, with Sherwood Smith (Nov 2002)back to Atlantis

 So they have not briefed you? Well, a run is a little jaunt back into history—not nice comfortable history such as you learned out of a book when you were a little kid. No, you are dropped back into some savage time before history— 

[Mar 2014]

Tom’s Midnight Garden
by Philippa Pearce
First publication: 1958

When young Tom is sent to live in a flat with his aunt and uncle, all he longs for is a garden to play in; when he finds it during midnight wanderings, it takes him a few nights to realize that the garden and his playmate Hattie are from the previous century.

 Town gardens are small, as a rule, and the Longs’ garden was no exception to the rule; there was a vegetable plot and a grass plot and one flower-bed and a rough patch by the back fence. 

[Mar 2011]

Wards Presents Magical Shoes
First publication: circa 1958
Of course, Montgomery Ward wants every kid to want their shoes, so what better way than to have a giveaway comic book advertisement in which young Billy and Milly realize that their Montgomery Ward shoes were special indeed!

 Milly: Theyre like seven-league boots!
Billy: Even better! Were covering a hundred miles at a step and were going back through history, too! These Ward shoes must have magical powers! 

[Jul 2012]


Host John W. Campbell, Jr., by Frank Kelly Freas

Exploring Tomorrow
hosted by John W. Campbell, Jr.
First time travel: 29 Jan 1958


From Dec 1957 to Jun 1958, John W. Campbell himself hosted this radio series for the Mutual Broadcasting System. Many episodes were written by John Flemming, and although there was no official connection between the show and Campbell’s Astounding, many other scripts were by Campbell’s stable of writers including Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Philip K. Dick, Gordon R. Dickson, Murry Leinster, Robert Silverberg and George O. Smith (“Time Traveler”). There were at least three time-travel episodes.

 Flashback (1/29/58)new father flashes forward to war
Time Traveler, aka Meddler’s Moon (5/21/58)   50 years back to grandparents
The Adventure of the Beauty Queen (6/25/58)love from the future

 Youve got a son to take care of you in your old age, Mr. Thompson. 
—from “Flashback”

[Mar 2012]

“Aristotle and the Gun”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Astounding, Feb 1958


When Sherman Weaver’s time machine project is abruptly canceled, he takes matters into his own hands, visiting Aristotle with the plan to ensure that the philosopher takes the scientific method to heart so strongly that the dark ages will never come and science will progress to a point where it appreciates Sherman’s particular genius.

 Like his colleagues, Aristotle never appreciated the need for constant verification. Thus, though he was married twice, he said that men have more teeth than women. He never thought to ask either of his wives to open her mouth for a count. 

[May 2012]

“Time Travel Inc.”
by Robert F. Young
First publication: Super-Science Fiction, Feb 1958
I found this in one of three old sf magazines that I traded for at Denver’s own West Side Books. (Thank you, Lois.) Both the title and the table-of-contents blurb (They wanted to witness the Cruxifiction) foreshadow Moorcock’s “Behold the Man”, although the story is not as vivid.

 Oh... The Cruxifiction. You want to witness it, of course— 

[Apr 2014]





The Change War Stories
by Fritz Leiber
First story: Astounding, Mar 1958

Two groups, the Snakes and the Spiders, battle each other for the control of all time.

 Try and Change the Past (Mar 1958)Astounding
The Big Time (Mar and Apr 1958) Galaxy
Damnation Morning (Aug 1959)Fantastic
The Oldest Soldier (May 1960)F&SF
No Great Magic (Dec 1963)Galaxy
Knight’s Move, aka Knight to Move (Dec 1965)Broadside
...
These might be Change War, but with no time travel:
A Deskful of Girls (Apr 1958) F&SF
The Number of the Beast (Dec 1958)Galaxy
The Haunted Future, aka Tranquility, or Else! (Nov 1959)    Fantastic
The Mind Spider (Nov 1959)Fantastic
When the Change-Winds Blow (Aug 1964) F&SF
Black Corridor (Dec 1967)Galaxy

 Change one event in the past and you get a brand new future? Erase the conquests of Alexander by nudging a Neolithic pebble? Extirpate America by pulling up a shoot of Sumerian grain? Brother, that isnt the way it works at all! The space-time continuums built of stubborn stuff and change is anything but a chain-reaction. 
—“Try and Change the Past”

[Apr 2012]

“Poor Little Warrior!”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1958

You are reading an artsy story, told in the second-person, about a time traveler from AD 2181 who hunts a brontosaurus.

 Time for listening to the oracle is past; youre beyond the stage for omens, youre now headed in for the kill, yours or his; superstition has had its little day for today; from now on, only this windy nerve of yours, thius shakey conglomeration of muscle entangled untraceably beneath the sweat-shiny carapice of skin, this bloody little urge to slay the dragon, is going to answer all your orisons. 

[Dec 2013]

“Two Dooms”
by C.M. Kornbluth
First publication: Venture Science Fiction, Jul 1958

Young Dr. Edward Royland, a physicist at Los Alamos in 1945, travels via a Hopi God Food to the early 22nd century to see what a world ruled by the Axis powers will be like—and quite possibly setting off a seemingly endless sequence of alternate WWII stories such as The Man in the High Castle, most of which, sadly, do not include time travel.

I liked Kornbluth’s description of the differential analyzer as well as the cadre of office girls solving differential equations by brute force of adding machines.

 Instead of a decent differential analyzer machine they had a human sea of office girls with Burroughs desk calculators; the girls screamed “Banzai!” and charged on differential equations and swamped them by sheer volume; they clicked them to death with their little adding machines. Royland thought hungrily of Conants huge, beautiful analog differentiator up at M.I.T.; it was probably tied up by whatever the mysterious “Radiation Laboratory” there was doing. Royland suspected that the “Radiation Laboratory” had as much to do with radiation as his own “Manhattan Engineer District” had to do with Manhattan engineering. And the world was supposed to be trembling on the edge these days of a New Dispensation of Computing that would obsolete even the M.I.T. machine—tubes, relays, and binary arithmetic at blinding speed instead of the suavely turning cams and the smoothly extruding rods and the elegant scribed curves of Conants masterpiece. He decided that he would like it even less than he liked the little office girls clacking away, pushing lank hair from their dewed brows with undistracted hands. 

[May 2015]

“First Time Machine”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Honeymoon in Hell, Aug 1958
A short-short, 1950s version of the grandfather paradox with a resolution that’s not quite satisfying (branching universes, I think, but it’s unclear). The cover of the 1958 paperback is by Hieronymus Bosch (Grzegorz’s favorite painter) with an owl in the background (Grzegorz’s favorite bird)!

 What would have happened if youd rushed to the door and kicked yourself in the seat of the pants? 

[Aug 2011]

“Thing of Beauty”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Galaxy, Sep 1958
After a time-slip, con artist Gordon Fish receives nine packages containing a machine that makes magnificent drawings, but the instructions are in some unknown language.

 There was a time slip in Southern California at about one in the afternoon. Mr. Gordon Fish thought it was an earthquake. 

[Jun 2015]
The story also appeared in this 1959 collection.
“The Ugly Little Boy”
aka “Lastborn”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Galaxy, Sep 1958


Edith Fellowes is hired to look after young Timmie, a Neanderthal boy brought from the past, but never able to leave the time statis bubble where he lives.

 He was a very ugly little boy and Edith Fellowes loved him dearly. 

[Mar 1976]

“The Men Who Murdered Mohammed”
by Alfred Bester
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct 1958

When Professor Henry Hassel discovers his wife in the arms of another man, he does what any mad scientist would do: build a time machine to go back and kill his wife’s grandfather. He has no trouble changing the past, but any effect on the present seems rather harder to achieve.

 “While I was backing up, I inadvertently trampled and killed a small Pleistocene insect.”
   “Aha!” said Hassel.
   “I was terrified by the indicent. I had visions of returning to my world to find it completely changed as a result of this single death. Imagine my surprise when I returned to my world to find that nothing had changed!”
 

[Apr 2012]

The Time Element
by Rod Serling
First aired: 24 Nov 1958 (on Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse)


Serling wrote this one-hour time-travel episode as a pilot for a one-hour anthology show, but after it was filmed, Willaim Dozier at CBS requested a change to a half-hour format. So, “The Time Element” was shelved while Serling worked on a new pilot (which also had a stormy history). Meanwhile, Bert Granet, producer of the Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, caught wind of the original Serling pilot and quickly snapped up the production for which he had to then fight hard with the Westinghouse bigwigs in order to air.

The story involves a time traveler, Pete Jensen, who couldn’t stop the attack on Pearl Harbor, but he certainly made his mark as the Twilight Zone precursor.

 I have information that the Japanese are gonna bomb Pearl Harbor tomorrow morning at approximately 8am Honolulu time. 

[Dec 2010]

“A Statue for Father”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Satellite Science Fiction, Feb 1959


A wealthy man’s father was a time-travel researcher who died some years ago, but not before leaving a legacy for all mankind.

 Theyve put up statues to him, too. The oldest is on the hillside right here where the discovery was made. You can just see it out the window. Yes. Can you make out the inscription? Well, were standing at a bad angle. No matter. 

[Dec 2009]

Hallmark Hall of Fame
First time travel: 5 Feb 1958


Over the years, I’ seen dozens of the Hallmark Hall of Fame specials. More recently, I went through the list of episodes back to 1951 when they started as a weekly anthology show on NBC. I spotted only one episode with time travel, the venerable Berkeley Square, broadcast in color on a special day in 1959, but I haven't yet tracked down a copy to watch.
[Dec 1965]

“—All You Zombies—”
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Mar 1959




A 25-year-old man, originally born as an orphan girl named Jane, tells his story to a 55-year-old bartender who then recruits him for a time-travel adventure.

 When I opened you, I found a mess. I sent for the Chief of Surgery while I got the baby out, then we held a consultation with you on the table—and worked for hours to salvage what we could. You had two full sets of organs, both immature, but with the female set well enough developed for you to have a baby. They could never be any use to you again, so we took them out and rearranged things so that you can develop properly as a man. 

[May 1970]
from the telerecording of Nineteen-Eighty-Four
BBC Sunday-Night Theater
aka BBC Sunday-Night Play (1960-1963)
First time travel: 31 May 1959



For nearly all of 14 years, the BBC staged and broadcast weekly live plays, at least one which included time travel: a production of the 1926 play, Berkeley Square. According to lostshows.com, no copy of Berkeley Square survived, but I did enjoy a telerecording of their 1954 staging of Nineteen-Eighty-Four (with no time travel!) that caused a stir in cold-war era Britain.

 Attention, comrades, attention! Here is a complementary production bulletin issued by the Ministry of Plenty giving further glorious news of the success of the seventh three-year plan! In clear demonstration of the rising standards of our new, happy life, the latest calculated increases are as follows... 
Nineteen-Eighty-Four

[Feb 1977]
from Colorforms’ play set
Hector Heathcote
created by Eli Bauer
First publication: 4 Jul 1959

Hector first appeared in a movie theater short feature (I miss short features) called “The Minute and ½ Man” in 1959 where he goes back to the American Revolution and fouls things up until the end when he scares away the Redcoats (remniscent of the 1955 Casper cartoon). I haven’t seen that first cartoon in which Hector travels by time machine, but Hector later had tv escapades (his own show, starting 5 Oct 1963) visiting the likes of Daniel Boone and inventing the telephone in 1876, all without a time machine in the ones I saw. There was also a children’s book (which had no time travel), a Dell spin-off comic book (Mar 1964), and a Colorforms’ play set (which provided the image to the top-left).

 Youre wanted on the telephone—a young lady. 
—Wilbur the dog in “The First Telephone”

[circa 1963]

“Obituary”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1959


The wife of Lancelot Stebbins (not his real name) tells of the difficulties of being married to a man who is obsessively driven to find fame as a physicist, even to the point of worrying about what his obituary will say—but perhaps time travel can put that worry to rest.

 At any rate, he turned full on me. His lean body shook and his dark eyebrows pulled down over his deep-set eyes as he shrieked at me in a falsetto, “But Ill never read my obituary. Ill be deprived even of that.” 

[Apr 1979]

“The Love Letter”
by Jack Finney
First publication: The Saturday Evening Post, 1 Aug 1959


A young man looking for love in 1959 Brooklyn finds and answers a letter from a young woman in 1869 Brooklyn.

 The folded paper opened stiffly, the crease permanent with age, and even before I saw the date I knew this letter was old. The handwriting was obviously feminine, and beautifully clear—its called Spencerian, isnt it?—the letters perfectly formed and very ornate, the capitals especially being a whirl of dainty curlicues. The ink was rust-black, the date at the top of the page was May 14, 1882, and reading it, I saw that it was a love letter. 

[Mar 2005]

The Twilight Zone
created by Rod Serling
First time travel: 30 Oct 1959


Five seasons with at least 13 time-travel episodes. Four (marked with ¤) were written by Richard Matheson, one was by E. Jack Neuman (“Templeton”), one by Reginold Rose (“Horace Ford”), and the rest were by Serling (including “What You Need” based on a Lewis Padgett story with prescience only and no real time travel, “Execution” from a story of George Clayton Johnson, and “Of Late I Think of Cliffordville” from Malcolm Jameson’s “Blind Alley”).

 Walking Distance (30 Oct 1959)Hero to time of youth
Judgment Night (4 Dec 1959)Time Loop in World War II
What You Need (25 Dec 1959)Prescience (no time travel)
The Last Flight (5 Feb 1960) ¤42 years beyond WW II
Execution (1 Apr 1960)From 1880 West to 1960 NY
A Stop at Willoughby (6 May 1960)To idyllic past
The Trouble with Templeton (9 Dec 1960)To 1927
Back There (13 Jan 1961)Lincoln in 1865
The Odyssey of Flight 33 (24 Feb 1961)To age of dinosaurs and more
A Hundred Yards over the Rim (7 Apr 1961)From 1847 to 1961
Once Upon a Time (15 Dec 1961) ¤From 1890s to present
Death Ship (7 Feb 1963) ¤Time Loop?
No Time Like the Past (7 Mar 1963)To 1881 Indiana
Of Late I Think of Cliffordville (11 Apr 1963)From age 75 to 30
The Incredible World of Horace Ford (18 Apr 1963)   Hero to Time of Youth
The Bard (23 May 1963)Shakespeare to the present
The 7th Is Made Up of Phantoms (6 Dec 1963)To Custer’s Last Stand
Spur of the Moment (21 Feb 1964) ¤Heroine warns earlier self

 There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of mans fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the Twilight Zone. 

[Jul 1966]

“Halloween for Mr. Faulkner”
by August Derleth
First publication: Fantastic Universe, Nov 1959
Mr. Guy Faulkner, an American lost in the London fog, finds himself back in the time of the Gunpowder Plot.

 I say, Wright, now Guys here, we can get on with it. 

[Jul 2013]

Peabody’s Improbable History
created by Ted Key
First aired: 29 Nov 1959


The genius dog, Mr. Peabody, and his boy Sherman travel back in the Wayback Machine to see what truly happened at key points of history.

 Peabody here. 

[circa 1965]

Dell’s The Time Machine
adapted by Alex Toth
First publication: Mar 1960


The second comic book adaption was drawn by the talented storyteller and artist Alex Toth who closely followed the movie script in Dell’s Four Color 1085. Online sources indicate that this was March of 1960, though that would be several months before the movie.

 The year is 1900. The place is London, England, at an imposing mansion overlooking the river Thames. Impatient dinner guests sit in the library, awaiting an overdue host... 

[Aug 2005]

“I Love Galesburg in the Springtime”
by Jack Finney
First publication: McCall’s, Apr 1960


Reporter Oscar Mannheim has many opportunities in his long life, but never wants to leave the midwest Galesburg that he grew up in—and neither do its many other citizens and artifacts of the past.

 Tomake sure, I walked over to a newsboy and glanced at the stack of papers at his feet. It was The World; and The World hadt been published for years. The lead story said something about President Cleveland. Ive found that front page since, in the Public Library files, and it was printed June 11, 1894. 

[Mar 2005]

The Boy and the Pirates
by Bert I. Gordon, Lillie Hayward and Jerry Sackham (Gordon, director)
First release: 13 Apr 1960

Young Jimmy Warren asks a genie to send him from present-day Massachusetts to the time of Blackbeard where in order to avoid becoming a genie himself, Jimmy must trick the pirate into returning to Massachusetts.

 This is a funny lookin’ bottle—yeah, neat. But I bet if I took it home, Pop would say, “Its just another piece of junk.” Nobody lets me do anything I want to. I wish I was far away from here; I wish I was on a pirate ship. 

[Jan 2015]

“Flirgleflip”
by William Tenn
First publication: Of All Possible Worlds, Jun 1960
It’s difficult living in the intermediate era—the first to have an official Temporal Embassy from the future—because the embassy is always bossing people around and canceling promising research, but Thomas Alva Banderling won’ be stopped from sending his Martian archaeologist flirglefliper friend Terton to the past so that Banderling himself can get credit for inventing the time machine.

 Exactly. The Temporal Embassy. How can science live and breathe with such a modifier? Its a thousand times worse than any of these ancient repressions like the Inquisition, military control, or university trusteeship. You cant do this—it will be done first a century later; you cant do that—the sociological impact of such an invention upon your period will be too great for its present capacity; you should do this—nothing may come of it now, but somebody in an allied field a flock of years from now will be able to integrate your errors into a useful theory. 

[Apr 2012]

Beyond the Time Barrier
by Arthur C. Pierce
First release: July 1960

Major Bill Allison flies the experimental X-80 into the future where a plague has turned most humans into subhuman mutants and the rest (one of whom is a beautiful proto-Betazoid) are mostly mutes who live in an enclave wearing prototype Star Trek uniforms.

 Other nations? Mutants? What kind of talk is this? 

[Nov 2013]

“The Covenant”
by Anderson, Asimov, Sheckley, Leinster, and Bloch
First publication: Fantastic, Jul 1960

Captain Ban, son of the Warden, is told by an oracle that he alone must fly to the island stronghold of those masters of time, the Cloud-People.

 Your world is a slope and you roll down it all the time. Down and down until you wear out and die. 

[Dec 2003]

“Time Enough”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Amazing, Jul 1960
Through the magic of time travel, young Jimmy has the opportunity to relive a traumatic moment with a group of other young boys at the quarry and change the outcome.

 O "m a little tensed up, I guess, but I can do it. I wasnt really scared; it was the way it happened, so sudden. They never gave me a chance to get ready. 

[Jun 2015]

George Pal’s The Time Machine
adapted by David Duncan (George Pal, director)
First release: 17 Aug 1960


The time traveller now has a name—H. George Wells (played by Rod Taylor)—and Weena has the beautiful face of Yvette Mimieux.

 When I speak of time, Im speaking of the fourth dimension. 


Archie Comics (Superheroes)
created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby
First time travel: Adventures of the Fly 8, Sep 1960



Simon and Kirby created The Fly as part of Archie Comics attempt to ride the silver age superhero craze. He flew through time at least five times, with the first episode (in issue 8, no longer Simon and Kirby) being a trip to 3rd century Persia. The Jaguar also trekked at least six times starting in Pep 5 (Oct 1961) and continuing in the Man of Feline’s own comic book, Adventures of the Jaguar as well as Laugh Comics. And the Shield had some time-travel adventures, beginning in The Fly 37 (May 1966) where he met a gladiator from the future.

 My colleagues, clever as they are, would never dream of the angle I’ll use to get rid of the Fly! I’ll destroy him with beauty! 
—the evil Dovi in Adventures of the Fly 22 while bringing

[Apr 2012]

Tooter Turtle
First episode: 15 Oct 1960

In each of the 39 short episodes (aired as part of King Leonardo and His Short Subjects), young Tooter would visit Mr. Wizard with the latest passionate idea of what he wanted to be. Mr. Wizard would magically make him into his wish (often back in time), but it would always end up with Tooter learning a lesson.

 Be just vhat you is, not vhat you is not. Folks vhat do zis are ze happiest lot. 

[Dec 2010]

“Extempore”
aka “The Beach Where Time Began”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Far Out, 1961


Mr. Rossi yearns so much to travel through time that he manages to do so with only the power of his mind, but now he’s traveling is out of control: a series of moments past to present to future, which keep repeating but never the same.

 He found a secondhand copy of J.W. Dunnes An Experiment with Time and lost sleep for a week. He copied off the charts from it, Scotch-taped them to his wall; he wrote down his startling dreams every morning as soon as he awoke. There was a time outside time, Dunne said, in which to measure time; and a time outside that, in which to measure the time that measured time, and a time outside that. . . . Why not? 

[Jun 2015]

“My Object All Sublime”
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Galaxy, Jun 1961

A man becomes fast friends with a real estate entrepreneur who, one night, tells him a fantastic story of time-travelers in the far future who use the past as a criminal dumping ground.

 The homesickeness, though, thats what eats you. Little things you never noticed. Some particular food, the way people walk, the games played, the small-talk topics. Even the constellations. They're different in the future. The sun has traveled that far in its galactic orbit. 

[Nov 2013]

Walt Disney’s Donald Duck and the Gang Classical Cartoons
First time travel: 21 Jun 1961

Even before the modern Duck Tales that my kids watched, I’ll bet the animated Disney gang went romping through time numerous times. The only one that I remember seeing as a kid myself was a trek by a singing father and son to see the invention of the wheel by a prehistoric Donald Duck (“Donald and the Wheel”).

 Donald and the Wheel (21 Jun 1961)Donald Duck
Sir Gyro de Gearloose (6 Oct 1987)Duck Tales
Time Is Money (25 Nov 1988)Duck Tales

 This cat is really nowhere; in some circles, wed call him square. 

[Jul 2013]

“The End”
aka “Nightmare in Time”
by Fredric Brown
First publication: Nightmares and Geezenstacks, Jul 1961

I like Fredric Brown and his creative mind, but this was just a gimmick short short time-travel story in which the gimmick didn’t gimme anything. Now, if he had used this gimmick and the story had actually parsed, that would have caught my attention.

 ... run backward run... 

[Jul 2013]

“Rainbird”
by R.A. Lafferty
First publication: Galaxy, Dec 1961

At the end of this life, Higgston Rainbird, a prolific inventor of the late 18th century, invents a time machine to go back in time to tell himself how to be even more prolific.

 Yes, Ive missed so much. I wasted a lot of time. If only I could have avoided the blind alleys, I could have done many times as much. 

[Jul 2011]

A Wrinkle in Time Series
by Madeleine L’Engle
First book: 1962

I’m not sure that I remember a whole lot of time travel happening in the first book of the series, but as my excuse, Janet and I were mostly making eyes at each other as we read the mushy parts aloud in a tent in Scotland when we were young.

 It was a dark and stormy night. 

[Jun’1978]

“Where the Cluetts Are”
by Jack Finney
First publication: McCall
Ellie and Sam Cluett build a house that duplicates every fine detail of a house from Victorian times, and over time, the house gradually takes them back to that time.

 Were looking at a vanished sight. This is a commonplace sight of a world long gone and weve reached back and brought it to life again. Maybe we should have let it alone. 

[Jul 2015]

Clyde Crashcup
created by Ross Bagdasarian
First time travel: 31 Jan 1962

As a separate feature in The Alvin Show, Quirky Clyde Crashcup (with his assistant Leonardo) invented everything from babies to...a time machine that reverses all time.

 I should like to remind you that all of you who witnessed this demonstration are five minutes younger than you were when we started. 

[Sep 2012]

The Three Stooges Meet Hercules
by Norman Maurer and Elwood Ullman
First release: 15 Feb 1962

I’m a disgrace to my gender, as I coitainly never received the Three Stooges gene.

 Ill smash the first guy who says its all Greek to him. 

[Jun 2012]





The Times Without Numbers Stories
by John Brunner
First story: Science Fiction Adventure, 25, Mar 1962

In an alternate Spanish-dominated 20th century, Don Miguel Navarro is a time traveller in the western world’s Society of Time who are locked in a time-travel cold war with the Confederacy of the East, not to mention their task of tracking down various time crimes.

I try to avoid major spoilers (stop reading now, if you wish), but the reason that Don Miguel ends up in a world without time travel is one that I thought of (long after Brunner) based on fixed-points in mathematics. That idea alone gives the story an extra star.

The original three stories appeared in three consecutive issues of Science Fiction Adventure, and they were later fixed up into a short novel that was subsequently expanded. It’s the expanded version that I read from the CU library.

 Spoil of Yesterday (Mar 1962)Science Fiction Adventure
The Word Not Written (May 1962)Science Fiction Adventure
The Fullness of Time (Jul 1962)Science Fiction Adventure
Times Without Numbers (1962)fix-up novel
Times Without Numbers (1969)expanded

 It wasnt only the embarrassing experience of being shown off around the hall by her—as it were, a real live time-traveller, exclamation point, in the same tone of voice as one would say, “A real live tiger!” That happened too often for members of the Society of Time not to have grown used to it; there were, after all, fewer than a thousand of them in the whole of the Empire. 

[Apr 2014]









Marvel Comics (Superheroes)
fearlessly led by Stan Lee
First time travel: Fantastic Four 5, Jul 1962


The Marvel Brand began as early as 1939 with the first edition of Marvel Comics. Throughout the ’40s and ’50s, some of the Timely and Atlas comics had the slogan “A Marvel Magazine,” ”Marvel Comic,” or a small “MC” on the cover (such as Tiny Tessie 24, which I found in my dad’s stash).

As for me, I was hooked when Marvel started publishing the Fantastic Four in 1961. During the sixties, I devoured all 830 Marvel superhero comics as they arrived at the local Rexall Drug Store. By my count, 37 of those 830 issues in the ’60s involved superhero time travel, starting with Fantastic Four 5 in July 1962. After 1969, there was no time travel in comic books, not ever (or, if you prefer, you may count everything as time travel, but never mind). Are you suprised that Spider-man never took off in time during the ’60s? He did come close in Avengers 11, but in any case, here are those occurrences:

 Fantastic Four 5 (Jul 1962)FF to time of Blackbeard
Journey into Mystery 86 (Nov 1962)Thor vs Zarkko, the Tomorrow Man
Journey into Mystery 101 (Feb 1963)Thor travels to future to be Zarkko slave
Journey into Mystery 102 (Feb 1963)   Thor returns to the present, a free god!
Tales of Suspense 44 (Aug 1963)Iron Man to time of Cleopatra
Fantastic Four 19 (Oct 1963)FF to ancient Egypt
Strange Tales 123 (Aug 1963)Doc Strange sends Thor’s hammer back
Fantastic Four 23 (Feb 1964)Dinosaur to Baxter Building
Avengers 8 (Sep 1964)Kang the Conqueror from the future
Fantastic Four Annual 2 (Sep 1964)FF vs Rama-Tut [reprint and new]
Strange Tales 124 (Sep 1964)Doc Strange to time of Cleopatra
Avengers 10 (Nov 1964)Immortus (aka Kang) from the future
Avengers 11 (Dec 1964)Kang (again) and Spider-Man (sort of)
Fantastic Four 34 (Jan 1965)Gideon uses Doom’s machine
Strange Tales 129 (Feb 1965)Doc Strange travels back an hour or so
Strange Tales 134 (Jul 1965)FF vs Kang
Fantastic Four Annual 3 (Sep 1965)Cadre of villains sent to the past
Avengers 23 (Dec 1965)Avengers defeated by Kang in the future
Journey into Mystery 122 (Nov 1965)Thor moves Hobbs through time
Avengers 24 (Jan 1966)Avengers defeat Kang in the future!
Tales to Astonish 75 (Jan 1966)Hulk to post-apocalyptic future
Tales to Astonish 76 (Feb 1966)Hulk vs King Arrkam in the future
Tales to Astonish 77 (Mar 1966)Hulk vs the Executioner in the future
Tales to Astonish 78 (Apr 1966)Hulk returns from post-apocalyptic future
Avengers 28 (May 1966)Collector/Beetle in time machine
Strange Tales 148 (Sep 1966)Book of Vishanti to ancient times
Strange Tales 150 (Nov 1966)Doc Strange to ancient Babylon
Thor 140 (May 1967)Thor vs Growing Man (Kang’s minion)
Avengers 56 (Sep 1968)To World War II
Avengers Annual 2 (Sep 1968)The Scarlett Centurion (aka Kang)
Iron Man 5 (Sep 1968)Warriors from 24th century
Marvel Super-Heroes 18 (Jan 1969)Guardians of the Galaxy from the Future
Marvel Super-Heroes 20 (May 1969)Diablo uses Doom’s time platform
Silver Surfer 6 (Jun 1969)To the future and back by traveling fast
Avengers 69 (Oct 1969)Avengers vs Kang in 41st century
Avengers 70 (Nov 1969)Avengers vs Squadron Sinister
Avengers 71 (Dec 1969)Avengers to 1941 vs Invaders

 And now I shall send you back...hundreds of years into the past! You will have forty-eight hours to bring me Blackbeard’s treasure chest! Do not fail! 
—Dr. Doom in Fantastic Four 5

[Jun 1962]



Dell/Gold Key Comics (Spin-Offs)
First time travel: Dell Movie Classics 208, Aug 1962

In addition to the well-known comic book adaptation of The Time Machine, Dell and Gold Key comics had numerous movie and tv spin-offs in the 60s, some of which had time travel. Some were just one-shots (such as The Three Stooges Meet Hercules in Dell Movie Classics 208; and Hector Heathcote in 1964) while others were series (such as the short-lived two issues of The Time Tunnel in 1967). The second issue of The Outer Limits had a cover story, “The Boy with the Incredible Time Machine Saved the World,” which was reprinted in The Outer Limits 18. They were big on boys saving the world, usually from aliens. Tooter Turtle appeared in seven issues of King Leonardo and His Short Subjects, some of which were before Aug 1962, but their time travel pedigre is dubious because the issues I saw could have occured in the present day.

As I find other time travel stories, I’ll add them to my time travel comic book page.

 Two scientists are hurled helpless into the lost world of time! 
—from the cover of The Time Tunnel 1.

[Feb 1967]

Harvey Comics
founded by Alfred Harvey
First time travel: Richie Rich 13, Oct 1962

Richie Rich 13 was the first Harvey Comic that I ever bought (the same month as Fantastic Four 7). On the cover, the poor little rich boy was watching his big-screen tv with a master control that also indicated movies, hi-fi, phono-vision, short wave and satellites. And inside he time traveled to visit his ancestor Midas Rich. What more could a six-year-old want?

Other Harvey time-travel comics are listed on my time travel comics page.

 Away we go, Mawster Richie! 
—Alas, I no longer have that original Richie Rich comic, so I don’t know whether Cadbury said this or not, but he should have!

[Sep 1962]

“Time Has No Boundaries”
aka “The Face in the Photo”
by Jack Finney
First publication: The Saturday Evening Post, 13 Oct 1962


Young physics Professor Weygand is questioned by Instructor Martin O. Ihren about the disappearance of several recent criminals who have shown up in very old photos.

 I did, and saw what he meant; a face in the old picture almost identical with the one in the Wanted poster. It had the same astonishing length, the broad chin seeming nearly as wide as the cheekbones, and I looked up at Ihren. “ Who is it? His father? His grandfather?” 

[Mar 2005]

Astro Boy
aka Tetsuwan Atomu
created by Osamu Tezuka
First U.S. syndication: 1963


Astro Boy began as a Japanese comic (manga) in 1952 and then became an anime cartoon before anybody knew what anime was. The cartoons of the 21st century Pinocchioish robot boy were dubbed in English and syndicated in the U.S. starting in 1963. I do remember one time-travel episode in which Astro Boy stopped a time-traveling collector from the future who was after ancient animals and people for his zoo; and I suspect there was more time travel in the manga and later U.S. cartoons.

 Dads taking animals and plants and even people back with him to display in the 23rd century. 
—“Time Machine” (1963)

[circa 1963]

Time at the Top Series
by Edward Ormondroyd
First book: 1963

When motherless young Susan Shaw stumbles into a seventh floor porthole to the 19th century where she meets two fatherless children, the story from these two books (Time at the Top and All in Good Time) seems predictable, but Ormondroyd (and I) still had fun with it.

 It had come to her that part of the seventh floor must have been converted in o a very realistic stage set, and that the woman and the girl had been rehearsing their parts in a play. But no, that couldnt be it. No stage set that she had ever seen was so realistic thatyoucould hear cows and smell flowers and feel the warmth of the sunlight. 

[Dec 2014]

Time Cat
by Lloyd Alexander
First publication: 1963

Jason’s cat, Gareth, calmly reveals that he can take Jason to nine different times, and the history lessons ensue.

 I can visit nine different lives. Anywhere, any time, any country, any century. 

[Aug 2012]

“Who Else Could I Count On?”
by Manly Wade Wellman
First publication: Who Fears the Devil?, 1963

Wellman’s tall-tales character of John the Balladeer has a conversation with an old man who came from forty years in the future to stop a terrible war.

 Ive come back to this day and time to keep it from starting, if I can. Come with me, John, well go to the rulers of this world. Well make them believe, too, make them see that the war mustnt start. 

[Jul 2013]

Brain Boy
created by Herb Castle and Gil Kane
First time travel: Brain Boy 4, Mar/May 1963



All you really need to be a superhero is to be really smart. That’s Brain Boy, and he battled a time machine in issue 4 (Mar/May 1963).

 And you havent asked what the late Professor Krisher was working on. It was the practical application of a theory of time travel! Going back in time—say to civil war days, or the days of the Roman Empire! 

[Sep 1971]

A Hoax in Time
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Fantastic Stories of Imagination, Jun-Aug 1963
I haven’t yet read this serialized version that Laumer expanded to the novel The Great Time Machine Hoax in 1964, though I think this shorter version might have been published in the Armchair Fiction Double Novel 31 in 2011).

“Flux”
by Michael Moorcock and Barrington J. Bayley
First publication: New Worlds, Jul 1963
When the government of the European Economic Community has no idea what to do next, they send Marshall-in-Chief Max File ten years into the future to find out the eventual effects of their actions.

Although this story was too abstract for my taste, I did enjoy the early presentation of what today might be called a Boltzmann Brain.

 The world from which he had come, or any other world for that matter, could dissipate into its component elements at any instant, or could have come into being at any previous instant, complete with everybodys memories! 

[Apr 2012]

Dr. Weird Comics
by Howard Keltner
First publication: Star-Studded Comics #1, Sep 1963


Dr. Weird was Howard Keltner’s creation, appearing in the first issue top comic book fanzine of the early 1960s, Star-Studded Comics. Although, George R.R. Martin claims he was unrelated to the contemporaneous Dr. Strange, both projected themselves into the astral plane to fight occult menaces. Weird’s menaces, though, were certainly darker—and he came from the future.

\ I don’t know whether any episodes after the origin included time travel.

 Slowly and warily, the Astral Avenger approached a huge black wall. His substance seemed to waver and fade as he passed effortlessly through it into the blackened inside. 
—from Martin’s prose Dr. Weird story, “Only Kids Are

[Jun 2015]

The Gasman Cometh
by Michael Flanders and Larry Swann
First aired: At the Drop of Another Hat, 2 Oct 1963

When Janet asked why I was listening to this favorite of hers one Saturday morning, I told her I was adding it to my time travel page. She just rolled her eyes and said, “I never would have guessed.”

 ’Twas on a Monday morning, the gasman came to call... 

[Jun 1980]

The Outer Limits
created by Leslie Stevens
First time travel: 14 Oct 1963



The original series ran only a season and a half with 49 episodes on the science fiction end of The Twilight Zone mold, but a full hour long. At least four episodes had some time travel.

 The Man Who Was Never Born (14 Oct 1963)back to stop a plague
Controlled Experiment (13 Jan 1964)comedy pilot with time travel
Soldier (19 Sep 1964)future soldier to 1964
Demon with a Glass Hand (17 Oct 1964)aliens invade from future

 There is nothing wrong with your television set. Do not attempt to adjust the picture. We are controlling transmission. We will control the horizontal. We will control the vertical. We can change the focus to a soft blur or sharpen it to crystal clarity. For the next hour, sit quietly and we will control all that you see and hear. You are about to participate in a great adventure. You are about the experience the awe and mystery which reaches from the inner mind to . . . The Outer Limits! 

[Oct 1963]

Dr. Who
created by Sydney Newman, C.E. Webber, and Donald Wilson
First episode: 23 Nov 1963

Sadly, I’ve never been a vassel of the Time Lord, though I’ve seen his pull on his other subjects such as my student Viktor who gave me a run-down of the tv and movie series and spin-offs. In exchange, I guaranteed him at least a 4-star rating and he promised to never again mention the short story, comic book, audio book, radio, cartoon, novel, t-shirt, stage and coffee mug spin-offs.

 Dr. Who (23 Nov 1963 - 6 Dec 1989)original series
Dr. Who and the Daleks (23 Aug 1965)theatrical movie
Daleks’s Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D. (5 Aug 1966)theatrical movie
K-9 and Company (28 Dec 1981)spin-off series
P.R.O.B.E. The Zero Imperative (1994)direct-to-video
P.R.O.B.E. The Devil of Winterborne (1995)direct-to-video
P.R.O.B.E. Unnatural Selection (1996)direct-to-video
P.R.O.B.E. Ghosts of Winterborne (1996)direct-to-video
Dr. Who (12 May 1996)tv movie
Dr. Who (26 Mar 2005 - present)series revival
Torchwood (22 Oct 2006 - 15 Sep 2011)spin-off series
The Sarah Jane Adventures (1 Jan 2007 - 18 Oct 2011)spin-off series
K-9 and Company (31 Oct 2009 - 3 Apr 2010)spin-off series
Counter-Measures (Jul 2012 - Jan 2014)audio spin-off

 Hard to remember. Some time soon now, I think. 
—The Doctor answering a police officer’s query as to his date of birth


“Waterspider”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: If, Jan 1964

Aaron Tozzo and his colleague Gilly travel back to a 1950s science fiction convention (to them, a Pre-Cog Gathering) to ’nap Poul Anderson because they believe that sf writers have pre-cognition of their own time that can solve their current space travel problem. A cute story with descriptions of many writers of the time, but the ending takes that turn that I never like of Tozzo slowly losing his memory of the original world after they inadvertantly change something.

 “Yes,” he said to Poul, “you do strike me as very, very faintly introve—no offense meant, sir, I mean, it’s legal to be introved.” 

[Dec 2011]

Herbie, the Fat Fury
created by Richard E. Hughes (as by Shane O’Shea) and Ogden Whitney
First time travel: Herbie 1, Apr/May 1964


Herbie Popnecker was the prototypical cool nerd before there were cool nerds, and his lollipops and grandfather clock took him to different eras 13 times, the first episode being in the first issue of his own comic (after five monotime appearances in ACG’s Forbidden Worlds). He also had an early cameo in a time-travel story in Unknown Worlds #20 (Jan 1963). All in all, the fat fury time traveled in Herbie numbers 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and the odd issues in 9 through 23 (not to mention a 1994 cameo in Flaming Carrot 31).

 Civil War...wonder how it’s going to turn out? 

[Apr 1964]

Farnham’s Freehold
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: If, Jul to Oct 1964


Hugh Farnam makes good preparations for his family to survive a nuclear holocast, but are the preparations enough to survive a trip to the future?

 Because the communists are realists. They never risk a war that would hurt them, even if they could win. So they wont risk one they cant win. 

[Aug 1969]

“A Bulletin from the Trustees of the Institute for Advanced Research at Marmouth, Massachusetts”
by Wilma Shore
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Aug 1964
After Dr. Edwin Gerber’s death, a tape recording surfaces that purportedly has him interviewing a man from the year 2061.

 Q. How does it feel to go back a hundred— 

[Apr 2012]

Charlton Comics (Superheroes)
First time travel: Blue Beetle 2, Sep 1964


When I turned 10, Steve Ditko broke my heart by leaving Marvel and rejoining Charlton Comics, which published only two superheroes at that time. I loyally bought the new Blue Beetle (aquired from Fox Comics in the ’50s) and Captain Atom (whom Ditko had first drawn in 1960’s Space Adventures), but I no longer have them and I can’t remember whether they had any time travel in the ’60s. Nevertheless I know of a few possible time-travel moment in the ’60s Charlton superhero comics: the pre-Ditko Blue Beetle 2 (Sep 1964) features on its cover the Man of Dung vs. a mammoth and a saber-tooth tiger; Charton Premiere 1 (Sep 1967), which (among other items) has Pat Boyette’s time traveling Spookman; and Hercules 9 (Feb 1969) with Thane of Bagarth vs a 21st century time traveler.

 The mightiest man battles reds from today, and monsters from yesterday! 
—from Blue Beetle 2, Sep 1964

[Jul 1966]

The Great Time Machine Hoax
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Sep 1964


When Chester W. Chester inherits an omniscient computer, he and his business partner Case Mulvihill arrange to promote the machine as if it were a time machine.

 Now, this computer seems to be able to fake up just about any scene you want to take a look at. You name it, it sets it up. Chester, weve got the greatest side-show attraction in circus history! We book the public in at so much a head, and show ’em Daily Life in Ancient Rome, or Michelangelo sculpting the Pietà, or Napoleon leading the charge at Marengo. 

[Jan 2014]



The Alfred Hitchcock Hour
aka Alfred Hitchcock Presents
created by Alfred Hitchcock
First time travel: 28 Sep 1964


As a kid, I knew of the iconic theme song and profile of Alfred Hitchcock, but it wasn’t until 2013 that I spotted one episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour with time travel—namely, their adaptation of John Wyndham’s “Consider Her Ways.”

 This evenings tale begins with a nightmare-like experience, but that is only a prelude to the terrifying events which follow. And now, speaking of terrifying events... 

[Jan 2013]

The Time Travelers
by Ib Melchor and David L. Hewitt (Melchor, director)
First release: 29 Oct 1964


When group of time travelers accidentally see that the world will be desolate 107 years in the future, an electrician, two scientists and finally the curvaceous blonde technician all jump through the portal, only to have the portal collapse behind them, whereupon they are chased on the surface by Morlockish creatures who are afraid of thrown rocks and they meet an advanced, post-apocalyptic, underground society that employs androids and is planning a generation-long trip to Alpha Centauri.

 Keep an eye out for them. Get as many rocks as you can. 

[May 2012]

“Famous First Words”
by Harry Harrison
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 1965
For the most part, this story is about a cantankerous inventor who merely listens in on past historical events—which, of course does not qualify as time travel. But there’s that “for the most part...”

 Thor, will you please take care of... 

[Feb 2010]

“The Kilimanjaro Machine”
aka “The Kilimanjaro Device”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Life, 22 Jan 1965

This story is Bradbury’s tribute to Hemingway, a time-traveling tribute told from the point of view of a reader who admired him and felt that his Idaho grave was wrong.

 On the way there, with not one sound, the dog passed away. Died on the front seat—as if he knew. . .and knowing, picked the better way. 

[Apr 2014]



Campfire Tales from Philmont Scout Ranch
by Al Stenzel
First publication: Boys’ Life, Mar 1965

A Navaho who steps through the cave finds himself at a vast inland sea; at first it is populated by dinosaurs, but each subsequent strip takes him to a later time.

Jon Shultis told me of this comic strip that told the tale of the Cave of Time in many of the Boys’ Life issues from March 1965 through March 1967.

 This is all wrong! If I dare change their stone age way of life, it may affect the whole future of their race. 

[Jun 2012]

“Double Take”
by Jack Finney
First publication: Playboy, Apr 1965

Jake Pelman is hopelessly in love with Jessica, the breathtaking star in a movie that he works on, but it takes a breathless trip to the 1920s for Jess to realize what her feelings for Jake might be.

 Out of the worlds three billion people there cant be more than, say, a hundred women like Jessica Maxwell. 

[May 2011]

“Man in His Time”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Science Fantasy, Apr 1965
Janet Westerman is trying to cope with the return of her husband Jack from a mission to Mars in which some aspect of the planet made it so that his sensory input now comes from 3.3077 minutes in the future.

 Dropping the letter, she held her head in her hands, closing her eyes as in the curved bone of her skull she heard all her possible courses of action jar together, future lifelines that annihilated each other. 

[Aug 2012]

“Wrong-Way Street”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Galaxy, Apr 1965

Ever since an accident that killed his eight-year-old brother, Mike Capoferri has been interested in time travel, and now he thinks one of the alien artifacts found on the moon is a time machine.

 Mike was a recent but ardent science-fiction fan. “I want to change it, Dr. Stuart,” he said earnestly. “I want to go back to four weeks ago and take away Tonys Flexy.” He meant it, of course. 

[Apr 2012]



The Corridors of Time
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Amazing Stories, May-Jun 1965

While awaiting trial for a self-defense killing, young Malcolm Lockridge is approached by a wealthy beauty, Storm Darroway, who offers to defend him in return for him joining her in what he eventually finds out are Wars in Time between the naturalist Wardens and the technocrat Rangers.

For many years, I thought this novel was part of Poul’s Time Patrol series, until Bob Hasse mentioned this as one of his favorites that is not in the series. The beginning reminded me of Heinlein’s Glory Road, and the rest is remniscent of Asimov’s The End of Eternity, both of which captivated me in the summer of 1968. Poul’s book holds up well in that company.

 A series of parallel black lines, several inches apart, extended from it, some distance across the corridor floor. At the head of each was a brief inscription, in no alphabet he could recognize. But every ten feet or so a number was added. He saw 4950, 4951, 4952... 

[Apr 2014]

My Favorite Martian
created by John L. Greene
First time travel: 20 Jun 1965

Three seasons with at least 8 time-travel episodes All time travel occurs with Martin’s CCTBS, a cathode-ray, centrifugal, time breakascope.

 Time Out for Martin (20 Jun 1965)to 1215 England
Go West, Young Martian (12 Sep 1965)to 1849 St. Louis
The Time Machine Is Waking Up... (21 Nov 1965)   Jesse James from 1870
The O’Hara Caper (19 Dec 1965)back to lunchtime
Heir Today, Gone Tomorrow (2 Jan 1966)to 1920/45 Cleveland
When You Get Back Home... (27 Feb 1966)back to the morning
Martin Meets His Match (27 Mar 1966)Da Vinci from 1400s
Pay the Man the $24 (1 May 1966)to 1626 Manhattan

 What a planet for me to get marooned on. 

[Jun 1965]

Gorgo
by Joe Gill, Steve Ditko, Dick Giordano and ROcco Mastroserio
First time travel: Gorgo 23, Sep 1965



I don’t know which was conceived first: the movie version of Gorgo giant-monster-from-the-sea (who turns out to be a baby) or the comic book version, but the comic book version from Charlton first appeared in December 1959, whereas the movie wasn’t released until 1961. More importantly, however, the final issue of the comic (Gorgo 23, Sep 1965) has time travel when Dr. Hobart Howarth rescues Gorgo from an evil Pentagon attack by sending the giant lizard back to the late Jurassic.
Sadly, as a child, I bought only one Gorgo comic, which was not the time-travel issue, but the stories are definitely drawn by Steve Ditko, hooray!

 I, Senator Sam Brockton tell you this, my fellow citizens, the great danger to our world isnt communism it is Gorgo and the female that spawned him! 
Gorgo 16

[Jun 2015]

I Dream of Jeannie
created by Sidney Sheldon
First time travel: 25 Sep 1965


Five seasons with 3 time-travel episodes, all with Jeannie (who was the primary reason I wanted to be an astronaut).

Naturally, I never had any refined taste (as indicated by the four stars), but I was a product of my 60s childhood, and, besides, Jeannie (occassionly and briefly) had a belly button (including Season 5’s “Mrs. Djinn-Djinn”).

 My Hero? (25 Sep 1965)to ancient Babylon
My Master, the Pirate (13 Mar 1967)to Captain Kidd’s time
My Master, Napoleon’s Buddy (3 Apr 1967)   to Napoleaon's time

 Were at the marketplace, master. Oh, and there is Ali, the man who hit me. 
—from “My Hero?”

[Sep 1965]

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time
by Yasutaka Tsutsui (David Karashima, translator)
First publication: Chu̅aku Sannen, Nov 1965—Taka IchiMay 1966
After an earthquake and a fire keep her up late, junior high school girl Kazuko Yoshiyama rushes late to school with her friend Goro, and they both are run down by a speeding truck, but then she finds herself waking up again in a seemingly ordinary morning with no last-night earthquake, no last-night fire, and no runaway truck—at least not at this moment.

 As the first period of math class began, Mr. Komatsu—the fat math teacher—wrote down an equation on the board, and Kazuko began to frown. It was the very same problem theyd solved just the day before. But more than that, Mr. Komatsu had written the problem on the board at exactly the same time before, and Kazuko had been called to the front of the class, where shed struggled for some time over the solution. 

[Feb 2013]

Tunnel Through Time
by Lester Del Rey
First publication: May 1966

When Bob Miller’s dad invents a time machine and sends Doc Tom gets trapped in the time of the dinosaurs, there’s only one possible solution: send a pair of 17-year-olds (including Bob) back on a rescue mission!

This was the first book that I got through the Scholastic Book Club when we moved to Bellevue in 1968. Each month, the club would give you a flier where you ticked off the books that you wanted, and the next month the books would magically show up at school!

 But theyd overlooked someone. Me. Somehow, by hook or crook, I was going to make that trip, too. Doc Tom wasnt the only one who liked dinos! 

[Apr 1968]





Bewitched
created by Sidney Sheldon
First time travel: 26 May 1966


Eight seasons with at least 19 time-travel episodes, all with the enchanting Samantha. (I had a scheme to become the third Darrin.)

 What Every Young Man Should Know (26 May 1966)courtship days
A Most Unusual Wood Nymph (13 Oct 1966)to 1300s
My Friend Ben (8 Dec 1966)Ben Franklin
Samantha for the Defense (15 Dec 1966)more Ben
Aunt Clara’s Victoria Victory (9 Mar 1967)Queen Victoria
Bewitched, Bothered, and Infuriated (13 Apr 1967)back a few minutes
Samantha’s Thanksgiving to Remember (23 Nov 1967)to 1620
Samantha’s Da Vinci Dilemma (28 Dec 1967)Da Vinci
Samantha Goes South for a Spell (3 Oct 1968)to 1868
Samantha’s French Pastry (14 Nov 1968)Napoleon
The Battle of Burning Oak (13 Mar 1969)back a few minutes
Samantha’s Caesar Salad (2 Oct 1969)Julius Ceasar
Samantha’s Hot Bedwarmer (8 Oct 1970)1600 Salem
Paul Revere Rides Again (29 Oct 1970)Paul Revere
Samantha’s Old Salem Trip (12 Nov 1970)1600 Salem
The Return of Darrin the Bold (4 Feb 1971)to 1300s
How to Not Lose Your Head I/II (15/22 Sep 1971)Henry VIII
George Washington Zapped Here I/II (19/26 Feb 1972)   George Washington

 Oh, my stars! 

[May 1966]

Warren Comics (Anthologies)
founded by James Warren
First time travel: Creepy 9, Jun 1966



In the late 1960s, these horror comics were a little risqué for a young teen. Afterall, they were the size of a magazine, printed in black-and-white, were sold next to Playboy in the 7-11, and just for your teenaged-boy mind, they featured scantily clad, buxom women. I have only one issue that I actually managed to hang on to (Vampirella 13 from 1970), but I surreptitiously soaked up many other issues of Creepy and Eerie with fabulous covers by Frazetta and Krenkel. The earliest Eerie time travel that I’ve found so far was an adaptation of Robert Bloch’s story “The Past Master” in Eerie 12; and Creepy 9 had an (original?) Alex Toth (who adapted The Time Machine for George Pal) story called “Out of Time” in June 1966.

 Be silent...there is little time! From the pages of the great black book came the incantation that has drawn you from the future... 
—from “Out of Time”, Creepy 9

[Nov 1968]

“Divine Madness”
by Roger Zelazny
First publication: Magazine of Horror, Summer 1966

A man has seizures that reverse small portions of his life that he must then relive.

 The door slammed open. 

[Apr 1974]

“The Man from When”
by Dannie Plachta
First publication: If, Jul 1966

A man goes to investigate an explosion and finds a time traveler.

 A calculated risk, but I proved my point. In spite of everything, I still think it was worth it. 

[Jan 2014]

“Behold the Man”
by Michael Moorcock
First publication: New Worlds, Sep 1966
The first version of this story that I read was the 24-page graphic adaptation scripted by Doug Moench and illustrated by Alex Nino in final issue of my favorite comic magazine of 1975, the short-lived Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction. In the complex story, Karl Glogauer travels back to 28 A.D. hoping to meet Jesus, but none of the historical figures he meets are whom he expected.

 The Time Machine is a sphere full of milky fluid in which the traveler floats enclosed in a rubber suit, breathing through a hose leading into the wall of the machine. 
—from the graphic adaptation

[Oct 1975]

The Time Tunnel
created by Irwin Allen
First episode: 9 Sep 1966


When the senate threatens to cut off funding for Project Tic-Toc, Tony Newman and Doug Phillips set out to prove that the project is viable, but instead they are trapped moving from one past time (perhaps the Titanic!) to another (could be the first manned mission to Mars) each week.

 He could be living in yesterday or next week or a million years from now. 

[Sep 1966]

It’s about Time
created by Sherwood Schwartz
First episode: 11 Sep 1966


Astronauts Gilligan and the Skipper Mac and Hector get thrown from the space age to the stone age, complete with Tyrannosaurus Rex, English-speaking cavemen, a beautiful cavewoman (Imogene Coca) and the requisite hyjinx. Partway through the first season, the cavepeople came to modern-day New York.

During my 2012 visit to Bellevue, my college roommate Paul Eisenbrey reminded me of this show from our childhood.

 Its about time, its about space, about two men in the strangest place. 

[Sep 1966]

Star Trek
created by Gene Roddenberry
First time travel: 29 Sep 1966

There once was a Captain named Kirk
Who was known near and far as a flirt
Into hearts his show grew to
Undoubtedly due to
McCoy and that pointy-eared jerk
Gene Roddenberry is the most famous person that I’ve ever met. In 1975 he came to Pullman and I wangled the job of interviewing him for The Daily Evergreen. I didn’t know what to expect from a famous person, and was thrilled to find him friendly and interested in what I was studying at WSU (journalism at that time). Is this a good place to post my Star Trek limerick (from the fanzine, Free Fall, that Paul Chadwick, Dan Dorman and I published in high school)?

 The Naked Time (29 Sep 1966)back 71 hours
Tomorrow Is Yesterday (26 Jan 1967)to 1969
The City on the Edge of Forever (6 Apr 1967)   to the 1930s (by Harlan Ellison)
Assignment: Earth (29 Mar 1968)to 1968
All Our Yesterdays (14 Mar 1969)5000 years ago

 Peace and long life. 

[Sep 1966]

NoMan
created by Wally Wood, Len Brown and Larry Ivie
First time travel: NoMan 1, Nov 1966

NoMan, a cloaked hero with the power of invisibility, was a memeber of T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents, a team of superheroes first published in 1965 by Tower Comics. I didn’t read them until 1976, when I bought a black and white reprint comic, Uncanny Tales, when I was in Stirling. I don’t know whether any of the other agents time traveled, but NoMan did in both of the issues of his own comic (in Nov 1966 and Mar 1967).

 Trapped in the Past! 
—from the cover of NoMan 1

[Jun 2012]

Marvel Superhero Cartoons
First time travel: 10 Nov 1966

Admittedly, I watched Marvel cartoons on ABC Saturday morning as early as 1966, but I was never enamoured by them as I was with the comic books. I can list the first time travel in many series—including what I think is the first actual time travel of Spider-Man in any medium—but I have watched only a few.

 The Tomorrow Man (10 Nov 1966)Marvel Super Heroes
Rama Tut (9 Dec 1967)Fantastic Four (original)
Vine (16 Nov 1968)Spider-Man
The FF Meet Dr. Doom (21 Oct 1978)Fantastic Four (revival)
The Ghost Vikings (12 Oct 1979)Spider-Woman
The Creature and the Cavegirl (30 Oct 1982)The Hulk
Meets the Girl from Tomorrow (22 Oct 1983)SM and His Amazing Friends
Days of Future Past (13 Mar 1993)X-Men
Hulk Buster (10 Feb 1996)Iron Man
The End of Eternity (16 May 1998)Silver Surfer
Kang (13 Nov 1999)Avengers: United They Stand
Ascension, Part 2 (25 Oct 2003)X-Men: Evolution
Out of Time (15 Sep 2007)FF: World’s Greatest Heroes
Future X (8 Nov 2008) [or earlier?]Wolverine and the X-Men
World War Witch (30 Oct 2010)The Super Hero Squad
Iron Man 2099 (6 Jun 2012)Iron Man: Armored Adventures
New Avengers (25 Jun 2012)Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes  
Planet Doom (8 Dec 2013)Avengers Assemble!

 Hey, listen to this! ‘This is my last entry. I have set the machine to three million B.C. The door will remain open for any who wish to follow.’ 
—“Vine”, Episode 30 of the original Spider-Man cartoon

[Aug 2013]

Space Ghost
by Lewis Marshall, et. al.
First time travel: 26 Nov 1966

Back in 1966, there was a certain excitement about the each fall’s new lineup of cartoons. Maybe it was because the networks (CBS in the case of Space Ghost) made a big deal about it, even advertising in Marvel Comics; or maybe it was because kids had relatively few choices compared with today’s cable extravaganza. Whatever the reason, I do remember anxiously anticipating the new cartoons in 1966, including Space Ghost and Dino Boy. Space Ghost traveled through time at least once, back to the time of the Vikings in “The Time Machine.”

 Spaaaaaaaaaace Ghoooooooooost! 

[Nov 1966]

The Monkees
created by Bob Rafelson and Burt Schneider
First time travel: 12 Dec 1966

I knew that if I rewatched these reruns long enough, the space-time continuum would bend. In the episode “Dance, Monkee, Dance” (12 Dec 1966), Martin Van Buren himself comes for a free dance lesson.

 ♫ Im in love, Im a believer, I couldnt leave her if I tried. ♫ 

[Aug 2011]

One Million Years B.C.
by Brian Clemens (Don Chaffey, director)
First release: 30 Dec 1966

There’s no time travel in One Million Years B.C....or is there? How else do you explain modern humans and dinosaurs coexisting at a time when neither one was running around? (And how else am I gonna get Rachel Welch onto my web page? Remember, I was an impressionable young boy when this was released.)

 Loana: [pointing to self] Loana 

[Dec 2012]

The Wild Wild West
created by Michael Garrison
First time travel: 30 Dec 1966

Agents James T. West and Artemus Gordon (in hindsight, quite likely agents of Warehouse 12) traveled in time at least one time when they met none other than Ricardo Montalbán (aka Kahn) who plays Colonel Noel Barley Vautrain with a scheme to travel back to kill Ulysses S. Grant in “The Night of the Lord of Limbo”.

 The concept of a warp in the fabric of space, a break that could permit an object—or a group of Marco Polos if you please—to enter and go voyaging through space’s unlimited fourth dimension: time. 

[circa 1966]

Journey to the Center of Time
by David L. Hewitt (Hewitt, director)
First release: a forgetable day in 1967

Hewitt was able to take the same plot from his 1964 The Time Travelers, change the blonde to a brunette, and make an even worst movie, which Tim and I really did try to watch on dvd.

 Dr. Gordon: And since space-time is a continuum, the present is only a point moving along that continuum.
Mr. Stanton: When you put it like that, doctor, even I can understand it. 

[Mar 2013]

The Time Hoppers
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: 1967
The High Government of the 25th century has directed Joe Quellen (a Level Seven) to find out who’s behind the escapes in time by lowly unemployed Level Fourteens, Fifteens,...—and put a stop to it.

 Suppose, he thought fretfully, some bureaucrat in Class Seven or Nine or thereabouts had gone ahead on his own authority, trying to win a quick uptwitch by dynamic action, and had rounded up a few known hoppers in advance of their departure. Thereby completely snarling the fabric of the time-line and irrevocably altering the past. 

[Jun 2012]

“Thus We Frustrate Charlemagne”
by R.A. Lafferty
First publication: Galaxy, Feb 1967
The Ktistec machine Epiktistes and wise men of the world decide to change one moment in the dark ages while they carefully watch for changes in their own time.

 We set out basic texts, and we take careful note of the world as it is. If the world changes, then the texts should change here before our eyes. 

[Jul 2011]

“The Doctor”
by Theodore L. Thomas (as by Ted Thomas)
First publication: Orbit 2, Jun 1967
A doctor named Gant volunteers to be the first time traveler and ends up stranded in a time of cave people.

 There had been a time long ago when he had thought that these people would be grateful to him for his work, that he would become known by some such name as The Healer. 

[Jan 2014]

“Hawksbill Station”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Galaxy, Aug 1967
Jim Barrett was one of the first political prisoners sent on a one-way journey to a world of rock and ocean in 2,000,000,000 BC; now a secretive new arrival threatens to upset the harsh world that he looks after.

 One of his biggest problems here was keeping people from cracking up because there was too little privacy. Propinquity could be intolerable in a place like this. 

[Nov 2010]

Lost in Space
created by Irwin Allen
First time travel: 13 Sep 1967


Three seasons with 2 time-travel episodes.

 Visit to a Hostile Planet (13 Sep 1967)  to 1947
Time Merchant (17 Jan 1968)back to the launch

 Danger Will Robinson, danger! 

[Sep 1967]

An Age
aka Cryptozoic!
by Brian Aldiss
First serialized in: New Worlds, Oct-Dec 1967


Once again, here’s an example that’s not time travel. Instead, an artist name Edward Bush (and others) “mind travel” to the Jurassic (and other ages) where they may view the past without physically traveling. Viewing the past is not time travel. Interestingly, though, the authoritarian government can’t seem to get their hands on the travelers while they’re traveling.

 On his last mind into the Devonian, when this tragic illness was brewing, he had intercourse with a young woman called Ann. 

[May 2015]







Dragonriders of Pern
by Anne McCaffrey (some with Joan Lynn Nye or Tod McCaffrey)
First story: Analog Science Fiction, Oct 1967

By the time that Lessa of Ruatha Hold becomes Weyrwoman of the only remaining dragon weyr, the end of all Pern seems a possibility since a single weyr is not enough to fight off the falling threads from the Red Star.

I first read this when I returned to Pullman in 1978, but it was Allison Thompson-Brown who reminded me of that the dragons can go when as well as where.

 -A. Weyr Search (Oct 1967)Analog
-B: Dragonrider (Dec 1967-Jan 1968)Analog
1. Dragonflight (1968)includes A and B
2. Dragonquest (1970)first completely new novel
-C: The Smallest Dragonboy (1973)in Science Fiction Tales
-D. A Time When (1975)limited edition
3. The White Dragon (1978)includes D
4. Dragonsong (1976)1st Harper Hall book
5. Dragonsinger (1977)2nd Harper Hall book
6. Dragondrums (1979)3rd Harper Hall book
7. Moreta: Dragonlady of Pern (1983)set 1000 years earlier
-E: The Girl Who Heard Dragons (1986)in collection of same name
8. Nerilka’s Story (1986)sequel to Moreta
9. Dragonsdawn (1988)the first dragonriders
-F: The Impression (1989)in The Dragonlover’s Guide
10. Regegades of Pern (1989)retelling of 1 through 3
-G: Rescue Run (Aug 1991)Analog
11. All the Weyrs of Pern (1991)sequel to Renegades
-H: The P.E.R.N. Survey (Sep 1993)Amazing
-I: The Dolphins’ Bell (1993)Wildside Press
-J: The Ford of Red Hanrahan (1993)in 12
-K: The Second Weyr (1993)in 12
12. The Chronicles of Pern: First Fall (1993)collects G, H, I, J, K
13. The Dolphins of Pern (1994)colonists bring dolphins
14. Dragonseye (Oct 1998)aka Red Star Rising
-L: Runner of Pern (1998)in: Legends
15. The Masterharper of Pern (1998)Harper Robinton’s life
16. The Skies of Pern (2001)a comet hits!
-M: Ever the Twain (2002)in 17
17. A Gift of Dragons (2002)collects C, E, L. M
18. Dragon’s Kin (2003)1st Kindan book
19. Dragonsblood (2005)1st solo by Todd McCaffrey
20. Dragon’s Fire (2006)2nd Kindan book
21. Dragon Harper (2007)3rd Kindan book
22. Dragonheart (2008)by Todd McCaffrey
23. Dragongirl (2010)by Todd McCaffrey
24. Dragon’s Time (2011)sequel to Dragongirl
25. Sky Dragons (2012)sequel to Dragon’s Time

 Dragons can go between times as well as places. They go as easily to a when as to a where. 

[Oct 1978]

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea
created by Irwin Allen
First time travel: 3 Dec 1967


In the fourth season, the futuristic submarine Seaview and its crew had four time-traveling escapades, including the finale.

 Time Lock (12 Nov 1967)to the far future
A Time to Die (3 Dec 1967)to 1,000,000 B.C.
The Death Clock (24 Mar 1968)  Captain Crane is a time-machine guinea pig
No Way Back (31 Mar 1968)to the time of Benedict Arnold

 Suppose we had a working time device. Would we be able to get back aboard Seaview before the explosion, find out what caused it, and prevent it from happening? 
—Admiral Nelson to Mr. Pem in “No Way Back”

[Nov 1967]

Dark Shadows
created by Dan Curtis
First time travel: 20 Nov 1967

If you were a cool kid in the 60s, you ran home from school to watch Dark Shadows, a vampiresque soap opera that presaged Twilight by about four decades. I wasn’t that cool myself, but my sister Lynda was, and from time to time I overheard her and the cool kids talking about the inhabitants of Collinwood trekking to the late 1700s (in episodes from late 1967 through early 1969) and the late 1800s (in the March 1969 episodes). There may well be other time-travel escapades that have escaped me.

 Im afraid you must forgive me, miss. If we have met before, Im sorry to say that I dont remember it. 
—Barnibus to Victoria Winters when she unexpectedly travels to 1795 for the first time

[Nov 1967]

Hawksbill Station
aka The Anvil of Time
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: 1968
The novelization pads out the original nine chapters of the novella and adds five new chapters with Barrett’s backstory as a revolutionary, right to the point where he’s sent back to the station.

I didn’t get much from the new chapters, and between the novel and the original story, I would recommend reading the 5-star original only.

 So Hawksbills machine did work, and the rumors were true, and this was where they sent the troublesome ones. Was Janet here too? He asked. No, Pleyel said. There were only men here. Twenty or thirty prisoners, managing somehow to survive. 

[Aug 2013]

Sam, of de Pluterdag
aka Where Were You Last Pluterday?
by Paul Van Herck
First publication: 1968 (Nederlands), 1973 (English translation)

I’m often confused as to whether an author is being humorous or being artsy, but if I’m not laughing a lot and it sounds a little like Kurt Vonnegut, then I assume it’ art. That’s the case here when science fiction writer Sam is put out of a job because science fiction has been banned, all of which happens just as he falls in love with the beautiful and carefree heiress Julie Vandermasten, who asks him to meet her next Pluterday—and yes, there’s a time machine involved, too, because he needs to go back after missing the Pluterday rendezvous.

 Sam got out of his bed. “Pluterday!” he rejoiced. And today he had an appointment with Julie. He did some push-ups, meditated a short while on the word om, which he didnt find fulfilling today, washed himself abundantly, and cursed the normal being that called Sunday a beautiful day. 

[Sep 2013]

Star Trek, the Blish Adaptations
adapted by James Blish
First time travel: Star Trek 2, Feb 1968

I bought the first four of these collections in July of 1971 in Huntsville, and the rest I snapped up as they were issued in the ’70s (plus Blish’s original novel Spock Must Die!). At that point in my life, I could recite them by heart. Here’s the list of time-travel adaptations, which does not include “The Naked Time” (in Star Trek 1) since the 71 hours of time travel was omitted in the Blish version:

 Tomorrow Is Yesterday (Feb 1968)in Star Trek 2
The City on the Edge of Forever    (Feb 1968)in Star Trek 2
Assignment: Earth (Apr 1969)in Star Trek 3
All Our Yesterdays (Jul 1971)in Star Trek 4

 “Jim,” McCoy said raggedly. “You deliberately stopped me ... Did you hear me? Do you know what you just did?”

Kirk could not reply. Spock took his arm gently. “He knows,” he said. “Soon you will know, too. And what
was ... now is again.” 
—The City on the Edge of Forever

[Jul 1971]

The Goblin Reservation
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Galaxy Science Fiction, Apr-Jun 1968

Professor Peter Maxwell sets out for one of the Coonskin planets, but his beam is intercepted and later returned to Earth only to find that his beam was actually duplicated, his duplicate has been killed, and his friends (some goblins, a ghost, and a time-traveling neanderthal among others) have already buried him.

I wonder whether this was the first transporter accident story (which, as we all know, eventually leads to two Will Rikers).

 You mean there were two Pete Maxwells? 

[May 2012]

The Masks of Time
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: May 1968
To me, this seemed like Robert Silverberg’s answer to Stranger in a Strange Land, although this time the stranger is Vornan-19, who claims to be from the future.

 Theres no economic need for us to cluster together, you know. 

[May 2014]

“Backtracked”
by Burt K. Filer
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1968
At forty-something, Fletcher sends his current well-honed body back ten years where his out-of-shape thirty-something mind and his thirty-something wife must now accept it without really knowing why the transfer was done.

 Maybe he should call Time Central? No, they were duty bound to give him no help at all. Theyd just say that at some point ten years in the future he had gone to them with a request to be backtracked to the present—and that before making the hop his mind had been run through that clear/reset wringer of theirs. 

[Apr 2012]

“The Beast That Shouted Love”
aka “The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World”
by Harlan Ellison
First publication: Galaxy, Jun 1968

For me, this nontraditional story didn’t bring any clarity to the notion of evil—but perhaps that’s what was intended, to artistically portray the incomprehensible nature of evil. Still, even without clarity, it was worth reading the award-winning story of evil being distilled and somehow sent throughout time by two future aliens: it stretched my understanding of story and helped me comprehend The Incredible Hulk 140.

 Seven dog-heads slept. 

[Dec 2013]

Yellow Submarine
by Lee Minoff, et. al.
First release: 17 Jul 1968

The psychedelic animation and pretense of a plot to save Pepperland from the Blue Meanies served as a pun-filled vehicle for a more than a dozen Beatles’ songs, but sadly the Beatles themselves had little participation in the film. On the upside, though, their journey did involve meeting themselves passing backwards through time.

 Old Fred: Now I dont want to alarm you, mates, but the years are going backwards.
George: Whats that mean, Old Fred?
Old Fred: It means tht if we slip back through time at this rate, pretty soon well all disappear up our own existence! 

[Jul 2068]

Slaughterhouse-Five
or the Children’s Crusade

by Kurt Vonnegut
First publication: 1969

Billy Pilgrim, a World War II veteran and sometimes zoo occupant on a far-off planet, lives one moment of his life, then he’s thrown back to another, then forward again, and so on amidst the sadness of what men do to each other in this deterministic and fatalistic universe.

 All this happened, more or less. The war parts, anyway, are pretty much true. One guy I knew really was shot in Dresden for taking a teapot that wasnt his. Another guy I knew really did threaten to have his personal enemies killed by hired gunmen after the war. And so on. 

[Jan 1975]

“Praiseworthy Saur”
aka “If”
by Harry Harrison
First publication: If, Feb 1969
At least three lizards from the future (Numbers 17, 35 and 44) project themselves into the past to protect their remote ancestor.

 The centuries will roll by and, one day, our race will reach its heights of glory. 

[Jan 2014]

Magnus, Robot Fighter
created by Russ Manning
First time travel: Magnus, Robot Fighter 26, May 1969


There were times in the 60s when there simply weren’t enough Marvel comics, so I picked up the occassional issue of Magnus, including issue 26 where the nemesis of robots was stranded in the distant future.

 No robot may harm a human, or allow a human to come to harm... 
—from the splash page of Magnus 1—by the 60s, Asimov’s first law had become so ingrained that the good doctor was not cited as the source of the law

[May 2012]

“The Timesweepers”
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Analog, Aug 1969
I haven’t yet read this short story that Laumer expanded to the novel Dinosaur Beach in 1971, though perhaps some day I will spot the Ballantime paperback, Timetracks, that collected it along with four other stories.

Woody Woodpecker
created by Bugs Hardaway, Walter Lantz and Alex Lovy
First time travel: 1 Sep 1969


I found one cartoon where the screwball woodpecker travels back in time: “Prehistoric Super Salesman” from 1969 where Professor Grossenfibber needs a subject for his time tunnel.

 Now my time machine is all ready for the experiment. All I need is somebody...is somebody...ah, the woodpecker, ya! 

[Jul 2013]



The Svetz Stories
by Larry Niven
First story: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct 1969

I first read these stories in Didcot in 1980, collected in the UK edition of The Flight of the Horse. Perhaps these are not time travel (which Niven does not believe in), since whenever our svelte hero, Svetz, tries to retrieve an animal from the past, he ends up with a fantasy version instead. I haven’t yet read the 1999 Svetz novel, Rainbow Mars.

 Get a Horse (aka The Flight of the Horse) (Oct 1969)   F&SF
Leviathon (Aug 1970)Playboy
Bird in the Hand (Oct 1970)F&SF
There’s a Wolf in My Time Machine (Kim 1071)F&SF
Death in a Cage (Sep 1973)in collection
Rainbow Mars (Mar 1999)novel

 He had come to get a horse; he had not expected to meet one at the door. How big was a horse? Where were horses found? Consider what the Institute had had to go on: a few pictures in a slavaged childrens book, and an old legend, not to be trusted, that the horse had once been used as a kind of animated vehicle! 

[Jul 1980]

Land of the Giants
created by Irwin Allen
First time travel: 21 Dec 1969


When a suborbital ship gets caught in a space storm, it ends up on a planet where everything and everyone is twelve times bigger than normal, providing fodder for adventure and at least two treks through time (“Home Sweet Home” on 12 Dec 1969, and “Wild Journey” on 8 Mar 1970).

The writing, acting and sets had little appeal to me, though I did enjoy Batgirl (Yvonne Craig) in “Wild Journey”, aka Marta, the green Orion dancer from the third season of Star Trek.

 But dont you see: If we never take that flight out, there would have never been a crash, and the others would have never been stranded on this planet. 
—from “Wild Country”

[Dec 1969]

Quest for the Future
by A.E. van Vogt
First publication: 1970


Hey, I got an idea! Let’s take three unrelated time-travel stories, change the name of the protagonist to be the same in all three, paste in some transition material, and call it a novel!

To be fair, I did enjoy this paperback when I bought it in the summer of 1970, but when I went to read van Vogt’s collected stories 42 years later, bits kept seeming familiar, which is when I discovered the truth. If I were a new reader, I’d just as soon read the individual stories and skip the conglomeration. The three stories are “Film Library,” “The Search” and “Far Centaurus” (all in van Vogt’s Transfinite collection).

 A new novel by “the undisputed idea man of the futuristic field” (to quote Forrest J. Ackerman) is bound to be an event of major interest to every science fiction reader. 
—from the back cover of the 1970 paperback

[Jul 1970]

“A Shape in Time”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: The Future Is Now, 1970
Time-traveling, Marriage-prevention specialist Agent L-3H has her first failure while trying to intervene in the 1880 marriage of Edwin Sullivan to Angelina Gilbert.

 Temporal Agent L-3H is always delectable in any shape; thats why the Bureau employs her on marriage-prevention assignments. 

[Jan 2013]

Time and Again
by Jack Finney
First publication: 1970

Si goes back to 19th century New York to solve a crime and (of course) fall in love.

This is Janet’s favorite time-travel novel, in which Finney elaborates on themes that were set in earlier stories such as “Double Take.”

 Theres a project. A U.S. government project I guess youd have to call it. Secret, naturally; as what isnt in government these days? In my opinion, and that of a handful of others, its more important than all the nuclear, space-exploration, satellite, and rocket programs put together, though a hell of a lot smaller. I tell you right off that I cant even hint what the project is about. And believe me, youd never guess. 

[May 1990]

The Year of the Quiet Sun
by Wilson Tucker
First publication: 1970

Brian Chaney—researcher, translator, statistician, a little of this and that— is unwillingly drafted as the third member of a team (which includes Major Moresby and Lt. Commander Saltus) to study and map the central United States at the turn of the century, at about the year 2000.

For me, I see the tone of several later items, such as the tv show Seven Days, as descendants of Tucker’s novel—and we finally understand why the Terminator arrives at his destination naked.

 She said: “It’s a matter of weight, Mr. Chaney. The machine must propel itself and you into the future, which is an operation requiring a tremendous amount of electrical energy. The engineers have advised us that total weight is a critical matter, that nothing but the passenger must be put forward or returned. They insist upon minimum weight.”
    “Naked? All the way naked?”
 

[Apr 2013]

The Time Trap Series
by Keith Laumer
First book: Aug 1970

In these two books (Time Trap and Back to Time Trap), Roger Tyson is caught in a battle between aliens and time travelers from the future.

 ...it would be our great privilege to bring to the hypergalactic masses, for the first time in temporal stasis, a glimpse of life on a simpler, more meaningless, and therefore highly illuminating scale. I pictured the proud intellects of Ikanion Nine, the lofty abstract cerebra of Yoop Two, the swarm-awareness of Vr One-ninety-nine, passing through these displays at so many megaergs per ego-complex, gathering insights into their own early evolutionary history. I hoped to see the little ones, their innocent organ clusters aglow, watching with shining radiation sensors as primitive organisms split atoms with stone axes, invented the wheel and the betatron, set forth on their crude Cunarders to explore the second dimension... 

[Jan 2014]

Timeslip
created by Ruth Boswell and James Boswell
First episode: 28 Sep 1970

Serious Simon and Emotional Elizabeth use the Time Barrier to travel to different doctorwhoish pasts and presents, never meeting the Time Lord himself, of course, but sometimes meeting versions of themselves and their families.

 Oold Beth: Sometimes in life you have to make decisions and hope they come out for the best. Youll know about that soon enough.
Young Liz: But Ill never make your decisions, will I?
Oold Beth: Then how did I come to make them? Were the same, Liz. But Im like a person Youll never be, and youre like a person I never was, never. 
—from “The Time of the Ice Box”

[Jul 2012]

“One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty”
by Harlan Ellison
First publication: Orbit 8, Oct 1970
At 42, Gus Rosenthal is in a place of security, importance, recogntion—in short, the perfect time to dig up that toy soldier that he buried in his back yard 30 years ago with the knowledge that doing so will take him back to that time to be an influence on an angry, bullied 12-year-old Gus.

 My thoughts were of myself: I’m coming to save you. I’m coming, Gus. You won’t hurt any more...you’ll never hurt. 

[Dan 2012]

“The Weed of Time”
by Norman Spinrad
First publication: Alchemy and Academe, Nov 1970
Spinrad’s tale contains no traditional time travel, but it does have an interesting concept of a man for whom every event in his life happens simultaneously.

 They will not accept the fact that choice is an illusion caused by the fact that future time-loci are hidden from those who advance sequentially along the time-stream one moment after the other in blissful ignorance. 

[May 2014]

“The Ever-Branching Tree”
by Harry Harrison
First publication: Science Against Man, Dec 1970
A Teacher takes a group of disinterested children on a field trip through time to see the evolution of life.

 Yesterday we watched the lightning strike the primordial chemical soup of the seas and saw the more complex chemicals being made that developed into the first life foms. We saw this single-celled life triumph over time and eternity by first developing the ability to divide into two cells, then to develope into composite, many-celled life forms. What do you remember about yesterday? 

[May 2011]
The cover art was by Marvel Comics artist Jim Steranko.
“In Entropy’s Jaws”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Infinity Two, 1971

John Skein, a communicator who telepathically facilitates meetings between minds, suffers a mental overload that causes him to experience stressful flashbacks and flashforwards, some of which lead him to seek a healing creature in the purple sands and blue-leaved trees by an orange sea under a lemon sun.

 Time is an ocean, and events come drifting to us as randomly as dead animals on the waves. We filter them. We screen out what doesnt make sense and admit them to our consciousness in what seems to be the right sequence. 

[Dec 2013]



The Partridge Family
“Albuquerque’ song by by Tony Romeo
First time travel (trust me): 26 Feb 1971


I first noticed a Partridge Family time traveler in the song “Point Me in the Direction of Albuquerque” in which the young girl is obviously lost in time (although oddly, the key lyric line was omitted from the tv episode “Road Song”). If you listen closely, there are many other science fictional themes in the songs of Shirley Jones’s tv family, for example, the clones in One Night Stand (♫I wish that I could be two people♫) and, of course, the ubiquitous references to immortality (♫Could it be forever?♫).

 ♫Showed me a ticket for a Greyhound bus
Her head was lost in time
She didn't know who or where she was
And anyone that helps me is a real good friend of mi--i--ine♫
 

[Feb 1971]

Escape from the Planet of the Apes
by Paul Dehn (Don Taylor, director)
First release: 21 May 1971

Among the original Apes movies, only this one had true time travel; the others involved only relativistic time dilation, which (as even Dr. Milo knows) is technically not time travel. But in this one, Milo, Cornelius and Zira are blown back to the time of the original astronauts and are pesecuted in a 70s made-for-tv manner.

 Given the power to alter the future, have we the right to use it? 

[Jan 2012]

The Dancer from Atlantis
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Aug 1971

On a romantic cruise with his wife and his troubled marriage, forty-year-old Duncan Reid is snatched from the deck by a vortex and deposited around 4000 B.C., where he meets three others who were similarly taken: the Russian Oleg, the Goth Uldin, and the beautiful bull-breeder Erissa who remembers the gods of her time, remembers Atlantis, and remembers Duncan fathering her child.

 She was lean, though full enough in hips and firm breasts to please any man, and long-limbed, swan-necked, head proudly held. That head was dolichocephalic but wide across brow and cheeks, tapering toward the chin, with, a classically straight nose and a full and mobile mouth which was a touch too big for conventional beauty. Arching brows and sooty lashes framed large bright eyes whose hazel shifted momentarily from leaf-green to storm-gray. Her black hair, thick and wavy, fell past her shoulders; a white streak ran back from the forehead. Except for suntan, a dusting of freckles, a few fine wrinkles and crows-feet, a beginning dryness, her skin was clear and fair. He guessed her age as about equal to his. 

[Jun 2015]

“Dazed”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Galaxy, Sep/Oct 1971
In 1950, a 25-year-old man begins to think that his own generation—those who will soon be in charge— are taking the world in an Orwellian direction because of an imbalance that’s occuring, so he writes a personal ad seeking help in rebalancing the world, and he gets an instant answer that, among other things, takes him a few decades into the future.

 When he was in Lilliput there was a war between the Lilliputians and another nation of little people—I forget what they called themselves—and Gulliver intervened and ended the war. Anyway, he researched the two countries and found they had once been one. And he tried to find out what caused so many years of bitter enmity between them after they split. He found that there had been two factions in that original kingdom—the Big Endians and the Little Endians. And do you know where that started? Far back in their history, at breakfast one morning, one of the kings courtiers opened his boiled egg at the big end and another told him that was wrong, it should be opened at the small end! The point Dean Swift was making is that from such insignificant causes grow conflicts that can last centuries and kill thousands. Well, he was near the thing thats plagued me all my life, but he was content to say it happened that way. What blow-torches me is—why. Why are human beings capable of hating each other over such trifles? Why, when an ancient triviality is proved to be the cause of trouble, dont people just stop fighting? 

[Jul 2013]

Dinosaur Beach
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Sep 1971


Timesweep agent Ravel finds himself the only survivor of an attack on the Dinosaur Beach substation until his wife shows up, although their marriage still lies in her future.

 The Timesweep program was a close parallel to the space sweep. The Old Era temporal experimenters had littered the timeways with everything from early one-way timecans to observation stations, dead bodies, abandoned instruments, weapons and equipment of all sorts, including an automatic mining setup established under the Antarctic icecap which caused headaches at the time of the Big Melt. 

[Jan 2014]

There Will Be TIme
by Poul Anderson
First publication: 1972

The doctor and confidant of Jack Havig relates Jack’s life story from the time the infant started disappearing and reappearing to the extended firefight through time with the few other time travelers that Havig encountered.

 No, no, no. I suppose it’s simply a logical impossibility to change the past, same as it’s logically impossible for a uniformly colored spot to be both red and green. 

[Feb 2012]

“When We Went to See the End of the World”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Universe 2, Feb 1972
Nick and Jane are disappointed when they discover that they are not the only ones from their social group to have time-tripped to see some aspect or other of the end of the world.

 “It looked like Detroit after the union nuked Ford,” Phil said. “Only much, much worse.” 

[Jan 2012]

“Against the Lafayette Escadrille”
by Gene Wolfe
First publication: Again Dangerous Visions, Mar 1972

I’m a little surprised at how much I am enjoying Gene Wolfe’s stories. This short tale is the second of Gene Wolfe’s stories in The Time Traveler’s Almanac. It is a fantasy of a man who builds an exact replica of a Fokker triplane; then, one day on a flight, he sees a beautiful girl in a vintage balloon, an event that seems explicable only via time travel. In mood, the story puts me in the mood of Jack Finney’s wonderful non-time-travel story, “Home Alone.”

 I circled her for some time then, she turning slowly in the basket to follow the motion of my plane, and we talked as well as we could with gestures and smiles. 

[May 2014]

Slaughterhouse-Five
adaptation by Stephen Geller
First release: 15 Mar 1972

Billy Pilgrim’s life, unstuck in time, is faithfully brought to the big screen, including fellow patient Mr. Rosewater who, I believe, is reading a Kilgore Trout story.

 I have come unstuck in time. 

[Mar 2014]

“Forever to a Hudson Bay Blanket”
by James Tiptree, Jr.
First publication: Fantastic, Aug 1972
At 75, heiress Loolie Aerovulpa travels back to her nubile teenaged body to throw herself at her one true love, Dovy Rapelle.

 “Do you like me? Im attractive, amt I?” She opened the blanket to look at herself. “I mean, am I attractive to you? Oh, Dovy, s-say something! Ive come so far, I chartered three jets, I, I,—Oh, Dovy d-darling! 

[Jul 1972]

“Proof”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Amazing, Sep 1972
Jackson, a reporter, wants proof that a time machine really works, and he also wouldn’t mind proof about who killed Seantor Burton 20 years ago.

 The Time Chamber. with its loose-hanging power cables and confused-looking control panel, didnt look much like Mr. Wells crystal bicycle. 

[Jun 2011]



The End of Time Series
by Michael Moorcock
First book: Oct 1972

Every now and then, a time traveler finds his way to the End of Time where a small group of decadent immortals manipulate matter and energy with power rings.

 1. An Alien Heat, Oct 1972Dancer Trilogy 1
2. The Hollow Lands, 1974Dancer Trilogy 2
3. Pale Roses, 1974in New Worlds 7
4. The End of All Songs, Jul 1976Dancer Trilogy 3
5. White Stars, Mar 1975in New Worlds 8
6. Ancient Shadows, Nov 1975in New Worlds 9
7. Legends from the End of Time, 1976
     aka Tales from the End of Time
includes 3,5,6
 
8. Transformation of Miss Mavis Ming, Feb 1977
     aka A Messiah at the End of Time
Expands Constant Fire
 
9. The Dancers at the End of Time, 1981includes 1,2,4
10. Elric at the End of Time, Sep 1981in Elsewhen
11. The Murderer’s Song, Aug 1986in Tales/Forbidden Planet

 Our time travellers, once they have visited the future, are only permitted (owing to the proerties of Time itself) at best brief returns to their present. 

[Apr 2014]

“(Now + n, Now - n)”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Nova 2, Oct 1972
Investor Aram Kevorkian has the unique advantage that he can communicate with himselves 48 hours yore and 48 hours hence, until he falls in love with Selene who dampens his psychic powers and his trading profits.

 “Go ahead, (now + n),” he tells me. ((To him I am (now + n). To myself I am (now). Everything is relative; n is exactly forty-eight hours these days.)) 

[May 2012]

“Stretch of Time”
by Ruth Berman
First publication: Analog, Oct 1972
Sylvia Fontis at Luna University has built a working time machine—she calls it the Dimensional Revolver—but she’s too scared to use it until Professor Kent comes up with an idea for an experiment.

 So what did you do, bring back the results of the Centauri Probe? Kill your grandmother? 

[Dec 2013]

The Brady Kids
directed by Hal Sutherland
First time travel: 16 Dec 1972

The kids, sans Alice and parents, starred in their own cartoon show with magical adventures including at least one time-travel incident where Marlon the wizard bird changes places with Merlin—all directed by Hal Sutherland, the soon-to-be director of the animated Star Trek.

 Boys: ♫Meet three sisters...
Girls: Now meet their brothers...
Marcia: Gregs the leader and a good man for the job.
Jan: Theres another boy, by the name of Peter.
Cindy: The youngest one is Bob.
Boys: See our sisters: Theyre all quite pretty.
Greg: First theres Marcia, with her eyes a sparklin’ blue.
Peter: Then theres Jan, the middle one, whos really groovy,...
Bobby: And sister Cindy, too.
Boys: Lets get set now for action and adventure, as we see things we never saw before.
Girls: Well meet Mop Top and Ping and Pong, the pandas, and Marlon who has voices by the score.
All: The Brady kids, the Brady kids, its the world of your friends the Brady kids.♫ 

[Dec 1972]

“The Greatest Television Show on Earth”
by J.G. Ballard
First publication: Ambit, Winter 1972/73

Wildly popular global tv stations are desperate for new material for their viewers, so the discovery of time travel in 2001 will be a fortuitous boon if it can live up to its hype.

 These safaris into the past cost approximately a million dollars a minute. After a few brief journeys to verify the Crucifixion, the signing of Magna Carta and Columbuss discovery of the Americas, the government-financed Einstein Memorial Time Centre at Princeton was forced to suspend operations.
Plainly, only one other group could finance further explorations into the past—the worlds television corporations.
 

[Jun 2015]

Frankenstein Unbound
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: 1973

When the weapons of war-torn 2020 open time slips that unpredictably mix places and times, grandfather Joe Boderland finds himself and his nuclear-powered car in 1816 Switzerland along with the seductive Mary Shelley, a maniacal Victor Frankenstein, and Frankenstein’s monster.

 You know, Joe, you are my first reader! A pity you don’t remember my book a little better! 

[Feb 2012]

The Man Who Folded Himself
by David Gerrold
First publication: 1973

Reluctant college student Danny Eakins inherits a time belt from his uncle, and he uses it over the rest of his life to come to know himself.

 The instructions were on the back of the clasp—when I touched it lightly, the words TIMEBELT, TEMPORAL TRANSPORT DEVICE, winked out and the first “page” of directions appeared in their place. 

[Dec 2010]





Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon Stories
by Spider Robinson
First story: Analog, Feb 1973

At Mike Callahan’s bar, the regulars listen to the tall tales of all time travelers (and others including aliens, vampires, talking dogs, etc.).

 The Guy with the Eyes (Feb 1973)Analog
The Time-Traveler (Apr 1974)Analog
The Law of Conservation of Pain (Dec 1974)Analog
Two Heads Are Better Than One (May 1975)Analog
Unnatural Causes (Oct 1975)Analog
A Voice Is Heard in Ramah... (Nov 1975)Analog
The Centipede’s Dilemma (1977)in Crosstime Saloon
Just Dessert (1977)in Crosstime Saloon
The Wonderful Conspiracy (1977)in Crosstime Saloon
Dog Day Evening (Oct 1977)Analog
Mirror/rorriM off the Wall (Nov 1977)Analog
Fivesight (Jul 1979)Omni
Have You Heard the One...? (Jun 1980)Analog
Pyotr’s Story (12 Oct 1981)Analog
Involuntary Man’s Laughter (Dec 1983)Analog
The Blacksmith’s Tale (Dec 1985)Analog
The Mick of Time (May 1986)Analog
The Paranoid (from Lady) (Winter 1988)in Pulphouse: Issue Two
Callahan’s Lady (1989)11 connected stories
Lady Slings the Booze (1991)aka Kill the Editor
The Callahan TouchMary’s Place book
The Immediate Family (Jan 1993)Analog
The End of the Painbow (Jul 1993)Analog
Off the Wall at Callahan’s1994
Callahan’s Legacy (1996)collection of quotes
Post Toast (circa 1996)USENET group alt.callahans
Callahan’s Key (2000)new novel
Callahan’s Con (2003)new novel
Too Hot Too Hoot (from Legacy) (Oct 2006)in This Is My Funniest

 And as Callahan refilled glasses all around, the time traveler told us his story. 

[Jul 1973]

“Linkage”
by Barry N. Malzberg
First publication: Demon Kind, Mar 1973
Donald Alan Freem is only eight, but he’s been institutionalized because of delusions that a time-traveling alien gave him the power to make people do whatever he wants.

 I made you say that. 

[Jul 2013]





Mad Magazine Movie Spoofs
starring by Alfred E. Newman
First time travel spoof: Mar 1973

As a kid, there were always too many comic books to read for me to have much interest in Mad, but in later years, I enjoyed the time-travel movie spoofs (though I’m unsure whether all the spoofs actually included time travel).

 The Planet That Went Ape and its sequels (Mar 1973)
Superduperman: The Movie (Jul 1979)
Bleak for the Future (Jan 1986)
Peggy Got Stewed and Married (Apr 1987)
Star Blecch IV: The Voyage Bombs (Jun 1987)
Bleak for the Future Part II (Jun 1990)
Iterminable Too Misjudgment Day (Jan 1992)
Groundhog Deja Vu (Sep 1993)
Star Blecch: Worst Contact (Dec 1996)
Corntact (Nov 1997)
Planet of the Remakes (Nov 2001)
Interminable 3 Rise of the Bad Scenes (Aug 2003)

 For some reason which will never be satisfactorily explained, I have been transported back in time to 1960! I must remember that Im now eighteen and not forty-three! Its great to be young again and be back in the good old days when I had nothing to worry about except SATs...and acne...braces...and being flat chested and living with insensitive parents...and...hey, get me out of here and back to the present! 
—from Peggy Got Stewed and Married

[Jan 1986]

“Paths”
by Edward Bryant
First publication: Vertex, Apr 1973
A traveler from the future makes his way to Morisel’s office to warn the reporter about the consequences of continued mindless rape of the environment.

In addition to acknowledging that Ed Bryant’s stories are among my favorites, I can also add that he is a kind and generous mentor to writers in the Denver area, including myself!

 I dont want to seem cynical. You may be my ten-times-removed egg-father or something, but right now its awfully hard not to believe youre just a run-of-the-mill aberrant. I mean, here you crawl into my office close to midnight, spread yourself down, and then calmly announce youre a traveler from the future. 

[Jul 2013]

Time Enough for Love
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Jun 1973



During his 2000 years of misadventures, Lazarus Long has loved and lost and loved again, so now he’s to die, unless Minerva can think of an exciting adventure: perhaps visiting his own childhood?

 This sad little lizard told me he was a brontosaurus on his mothers side. I did not laugh, people who boast of ancestry often have little else to sustain them. Humoring them costs nothing and adds to happiness in a world in which happiness is always in short supply. 

[Dec 1973]



Pendulum Classics’ The Time Machine
aka Marvel Classics Comics 2
adapted by Otto Binder and Alex Niño
First publication: Jun 1973

There’s a papal dispensation (straight from Clifford Simak) that allows me to list all comic book adaptations of The Time Machine, even if they appeared after 1969. This Alex Niño version was printed as a small black and white graphic novel at least twice (Pendulum Press B&W 1973 and Academic Industries Pocket Classics 1984,). I haven’t seen it directly, but I recently found out that it was colored and printed as the second issue of the Marvel Classics series, which I first read in Pullman in early 1976. The storyline follows the 1960 movie closely.

 As a trial, Ill just pull the future lever a short ways. 

[Jan 1976]

“12:01 P.M.”
by Richard Lupoff
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sep 1973


Myron Castleman is reliving 59 minutes of one day over and over for eternity.

 And Myron Castleman would be permitted to lie forever, piling up experiences and memories, but each of only an hour’s duration, each resumed at 12:01 PM on this balmy spring day in Manhattan, standing outside near the Grand Central Tower. 

[Jan 2012]

Star Trek: The Animated Series
directed by Hal Sutherland and Bill Reed
First time travel: 15 Sep 1973


This series has a special place in my heart because of the day in 1974 when Dan Dorman and I visited Hal Sutherland north of Seattle to interview him for our fanzine, Free Fall. He treated the two teenagers like royalty and made two lifelong fans.

I think the series had only one time-travel story, “Yesteryear” (written by D.C. Fontana), which was the second in Sutherland’s tenure. In that episode, Spock returns from a time-traveling mission to find that he’s now in a reality where he died at age 7, and hence he returns to his own childhood to save himself.

 Captains Log, Supplemental: When we were in the time vortex, something appears to have changed the present as we know it. No one aboard recognizes Mr. Spock. The only answer is that the past was—somehow—altered. 

[Sep 1973]

“Road Map”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Clairion III, Oct 1973
When Ralph Ascione dies, he is reincarnated as a female baby—but in what year and exactly which female?

 A new sound came; in the blurred distances, something moved. Vaguely seen, a huge face looked over him and made soft, deep clucking noises. Then he understood. 

[Nov 2010]

“Big Game”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Before the Golden Age, 1974

Jack Trent hears a half-drunken story of time travel and the real cause of the dinosaur extinction.

Asimov wrote this story in 1941, but it was lost until I found it in the Boston University archives in the early ’70s. Okay, maybe that fan who found it wasn’t me, but it could have been!

 Jack looked at Hornby solemnly. “You invented a time machine, did you?”
   “Long ago.” Hornby smiled amiably and filled his glass again. “Better than the ones those amateurs at Stanford rigged up. I’ve destroyed it, though. Lost interest.”
 

[Oct 1974]

“A Little Something for Us Tempunauts”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: Final Stage, 1974

Addison Doug and his two fellow time travelers seem to have caused a time loop wherein everyone is reliving the same events with only vague memories of what happened on the previous loop.

 Every man has more to live for than every other man. I dont have a cute chick to sleep with, but Id like to see the semis rolling along the Riverside Freeway at sunset a few more times. Its not what you have to live for; its that you want to live to see it, to be there—thats what is so damn sad. 

[Jun 2011]

“The Marathon Photograph”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Threads of Time, 1974
I feel for one character in this story: Humphrey, who wants no more than to figure out the various goings on—past, present and possibly future—in this out-of-the-way place where Andrew Thornton comes to fish and write a geology text, Andrew’s friend Neville Piper finds a cube with the a hologram of the Battle of Marathon alongside the bear-maulted body of the mysterious Stefan from the even more mysterious Lodge, and that long-lost mine that Humphrey has been researching is finally found without Humphrey ever being told of it.

 Humphrey did mind, naturally, but there was nothing he could do about it. Here was the chance to go up to the Lodge, probably to go inside it, and he was being counted out. But he did what he had to do with fairly good grace and said that he would stay. 

[Feb 2013]

“Master Ghost and I”
by Barbara Softly
First publication: The Tenth Fontana Book of Great Ghost Stories, 1974
A 17th century soldier inherits a house with a squatter from the future.

 “D-dark?” he stammered. “Ill switch on the light.” 

[Jan 2014]

CBS Mystery Radio Theater
created by Himan Brown
First time travel: 31 Jan 1974



The fun mp3 files include radio news, weather, commercials and more from the 70s, all surrounding the mystery story hosted by E.G. Marshall. Here are the time-travel episodes that I’ve found so far, including two (in July 1976 and March 1977) by Grand Master Alfred Bester.

 The Man Who Asked for Yesterday (31 Jan 1974)to the previous day
Yesterday’s Murder (27 Jun 1974)heroine redoes her life
Come Back with Me (2 Jul 1975)hero relives favorite times
Assassination in Time (26 Sep 1975)to Lincoln’s assasination
The Lap of the Gods (25 Nov 1975)sea captain in the 1820s
A Connecticut Yankee... (8 Jan 1976)to Camelot
There’s No Business Like (19 Jan 1976)to 2076
The Covered Bridge (23 Mar 1976)a feminist to the 1770s
Time Killer (5 Apr 1976)before Great Depression
Future Eye (19 Jul 1976)2976 detective to 1976
Now You See Them, Now You Don’t (12 Mar 1977)back from World War V
A Point of Time (15 Nov 1977)overthrow dictator in 2200
The Time Fold (16 Mar 1978)from 1979 to far future
Time Out of Mind (18 May 1978)to World War II
The Winds of Time (16 Oct 1978)heroine secures closure
The Time Box (18 Feb 1980)to the 1880s
The Man of Two Centuries (29 Apr 1981)Huron travels centuries
The Old Country (24 Mar 1982)back to World War II

 This is our bicentennial year: a time to pause and count our blessings. And among the greatest of these are the men and women of letters who flourished in our native land, who created a literature that was both typically American and universally admired. 
—host E.G. Marshall in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

[Jan 1974]

“If Ever I Should Leave You”
by Pamela Sargent
First publication: If, Feb 1974
A nameless narrator (called Nanette by an overly zealous copy-editor in the If publication) tells of time-traveler Yuri’s return as a dying old man and of the subsequent times when she visited him. I enjoyed that beginning part of the story, but the ending, as the narrator herself ages, spoke to me more deeply.

I met Pamela Sargent in Lawrence, Kansas, at Jim Gunn’s writing workshop. She was insightful and kind to the writers her came to learn from her and other talented writers.

 All the coordinates are there, all the places and times I went to these past months. When you're lonely, when you need me, go to the Time Station and Ill be waiting on the other side. 

[Apr 2014]

Future Tense
created by Eli Segal
First time travel: 7 May 1974



Professor Eli Segal and her students at Western Michigan College created quality new productions of radio shows that were mostly taken from old episodes of X Minus One and Dimension X. According to otr.org, the first season of Future Tense 18 stories (13 based on X-1 scripts, two based on DX scripts, and 3 original scripts) and these first aired as 16 episodes in May of 1974. The second season had ten episodes (8 based on X-1 scripts and 2 original scripts) which aired in July 1976, At least three episodes involved time travel. Now why couldn’t I have gone to WMC?

 The Old Die Rich (7 May 1974)sleuth forced into time machine
The Discovery of Morniel Mathaway (July 1976)   art critic from 25th century
An Imbalance of Species (July 1976)from “A Sound of Thunder’

 Stay tuned now for excitement and adventure in the world of the future! Entertainment for the entire family produced right here in Kalamazoo. 

[Jan 2012]

“The Birch Clump Cylinder”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Stellar 1, Sep 1974

When a contraption drops onto the Coon Creek Institute causing various objects to appear and disappear from out of time, Old Prather calls together three former students: someone with expertise in time travel (our discredited time-travel researcher and narrator, Charley Spencer), one whos a mean-spirited, world-famous mathematician (Leonard Asbury), and with no preconceptions about the matter (the lovely composer, Mary Holland, who broken more than one heart on the campus).

 A time machine has fallen into a clump of birch just above the little pond back of the machine shops. 

[Feb 2013]

“Renaissance Man”
by T.E.D. Klein
First publication: Space 2: A Collection of Science Fiction Stories, 5 Sep 1974
When the new time machine randomly grabs a random man from the future, all the waiting bigwigs and reporters are delighted that they managed to catch a scientist for the six-hour interview.

 We knew wed pull back someone from the Harvard Physics Department, because were here in the building right now. But it could have been just anyone. We might have found ourselve questioning a college freshman...Or a scrubwoman...Or even a tourist visiting the lab. 

[Jul 2013]

“Retroflex”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Vertex, Oct 1974
Haldene tracks down a man named Cochrane, who turns out to be a killer from the future.

 The one calling himself Cochrane is not of this era, but of a time far forward. 

[Jun 2011]

“If This Is Winnetka, You Must Be Judy”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Universe 5, Nov 1974
Larry Garth skips from year to year in his life (not linearly, of course), waiting to meet his once and future wife, Elaine.

 He lit a cigarette and leafed through the cards and minutiae that constituted his identity in the outside world. Well. . .knowing himself, his drivers permit would be up-to-date and all credit cards unexpired. The year was 1970. Another look outside: autumn. So he was thirty-five, and the pans clattered at the hands of Judy. 

[Jan 2011]
The story also appeared in the 1979 anthology, The Gollancz/Sunday Times Best SF Stories
“Let’s Go to Golgotha!”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Sunday Times Weekly Review, 15 Dec 1974

A typical family of four decide to go with their best friends to see the cruxifiction of Jesus.

 If youre talking about time-tours, why dont you come with us? Were going to see the Cruxifiction. 

[Jan 2014]



Sesame Street
created by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett
First time travel: 20 Dec 1974


From his early days, Kermit brought news reports to Sesame Street. I don't know when he first reported from back in history, so I’ll arbitrarily say that the first one was his interview of Christopher Columbus in Episode 700 shortly before Christmas in 1974.

In the 35th anniversary special, “The Street We Live On,” Grover takes Elmo on a trip through time to see how the street was in the past. Also, in a PBS special, “Elmo Saves Christmas,” the red guy visits a future Christmas.

 Columbus: But, say, what time is it?
Kermit: Oh, its about, ah, 1492. 

[Dec 1974]

“Trying to Connect You”
by John Rowe Townsend
First publication: The Eleventh Ghost Book, 1975
A man realizes the mistake he made with Elaine, and he desperately searches for a phone booth to call her before she leaves the country forever, but others want the phone booth, too, for a series of disasters that haven’t yet happened.

 Twenty-four hours after I left her, I knew I was wrong and knew what I should have said. 

[Jul 2013]

“Anniversary Project”
by Joe Haldeman
First publication: Analog, Oct 1975

One million years after the invention of writing, Three-Phasing (nominally male) brings a 20th century man and his wife forward in time to teach the ancestors of man how to read.

 “Pleasta Meetcha, Bob. Likewise, Sarah. Call me, uh...“ The only twentieth-century language in which Three-phasings name makes sense is propositional calculus. “ George. George Boole.” 

[Jul 2011]

“Timetipping”
by Jack Dann
First publication: Epoch, Nov 1975

People, animals (or at least parts of them), and a reluctant wandering Jew are tossed back and forth through alternate realities at various times.

 Nothing was for certain, anything could change (depending on your point of view), and almost anything could happen, especially to forgetful old men who often found themselves in the wrong century rather than on the wrong street. 

[Jul 2011]

The Chronopath Stories
by Steven Utley
First story: Galaxy, Jan 1976

I’ve read only the first of this series of stories which predates Utley’s better known Silurian tales. The first-person narrator, Bruce Holt, tells of his power (which he didn’t ask for and has no control over) of traveling through time and being deposited in other beings’ minds for a brief few seconds at a time.

 Getting Away (Jan 1976)Galaxy
Predators (Oct 1976)The Ideas of Tomorrow
To 1966 (Spring 1977)Chacal
Spectator Sport (Jul 1977)Amazing
The Maw (Jul 1977)F&SF
Time and Hagakure (Winter 1977) Asimovs
Where or When (Jan 1991) Asimovs
The Glowing Cloud (Jan 1992) Asimovs
Now That We Have Each Other (Jul 1992)   Asimovs
One Kansas Night (Jun 1994) Asimovs
Living It (Aug 1994) Asimovs
Staying in Storyville (Dec 2006)in When or Where
Life’s Work (Dec 2006)in When or Where
The Here and Now (Mar 1998) Asimovs

 What do you want me to do? Go back and find out where Captain Kidd buried his loot? 
—“Getting Away”

[Dec 2013]

“Birth of a Notion”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Amazing, Apr 1976


The world’s first time traveler, Simeon Weill, goes back to 1925 and gives some ideas to Hugo.

 That the first inventor of a workable time machine was a science fiction enthusiast is by no means a coincidence. 

[Apr 1976]

“Balsamo’s Mirror”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1976
MIT student W. Wilson Newbury has a creepy Lovecraftian friend who is enamored with the 18th century, so naturally they visit an Armenian gypsy who makes them passengers in the bodies of an 18th century pauper and his father.

This story gave me a game that I play of pretending that I have just arrived as a passenger in my own body with no control over my actions or observations. How long does it take to figure out who and where I am? So, I enjoyed that aspect of the story, but I have trouble reading phonetically spelled dialects.

 I didnt say that we could or should go back to pre-industrial technology. The changes since then were inevitable and irreversible. I only said... 

[Apr 2012]
1982 paperback edition
“Room 409”
by Nance Donkin
First publication: A Handful of Ghosts, Nov 1976
A thirteen-year-old Australian boy on vacation in England gets a key to a room that existed during World War II but no longer does.

 He didnt seem to fit in at all well with the modern decor of the place, but I got the key from him and went towards the lift. 

[Dec 2013]
The story also appeared in this 1996 collection.
“Execution”
by George Clayton Johnson
First publication: Scripts and Stories written for “The Twilight Zone”, 1977
A man without conscience who’s about to be hung in 1880 is transported to a scientist’s lab in 1960.

Serling turned Johnson’s story into a 1960 Twilight Zone episode, but I’m uncertain whether the story was published before Johnson’s 1977 restrospective collection. Johnson is also well-known for Logan’s Run, with Jenny Agutter but (sadly) no time travel.

 Commonplace, if somewhat grim, unsocial event known as a necktie party. The guest of dishonor, a cowboy named Joe Caswell, just a moment away from a rope, a short dance several feet off the ground, and then the dark eternity of all evil men. Mr. Joe Caswell who, when the good Lord passed out a conscience, a heart, a feeling for fellow man, must have been out for a beer and missed out. Mr. Joe Caswelll, in the last quiet moment of a violent life. 
—Opening narration of the Twilight Zone episode

[Feb 2012]

The Crisis Stories
by James Gunn
First story: Analog, Mar 1977
Bill Johnson travels from the future to affect important political change at moments of crisis, but each time he makes a change, he also forgets all personal details about himself.

 Child of the Sun (Mar 1977)Analog
The End of the World    (Jan 1984)Analog
Man of the Hour (Oct 1984)Analog
Mother of the Year (Apr 1985)Analog
Touch of the Match (Feb 1985)Analog
Will of the Wisp (May 1985)Analog
Crisis! (May 1986)fix-up novel

 But each time you intervene, no matter how subtly, you change the future from which you came. You exist in this time and outside of time and in the future, and so each change makes you forget. 

[Jul 2013]

“Air Raid”
by John Varley
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Spring 1977

Mandy snatches doomed people from the past in order to populate her war-decimated time.

 I had to choose between a panic if the fathead got them to thinking, and a possible panic from the flash of the gun. But when a 20th gets to talking about his “rights” and what he is “owed,&rdauo; things can get out of hand. 

[Jul 1977]

Star Wars
by George Lucas (Lucas, director)
First release: 25 May 1977

I’m just checking that you’re awake. Of course, in Star Wars, time travel no there is. Nevertheless, it gets onto the list simply because the fan-friendly George Lucas instigated an inclusive advertising campaign that sent me a colorful pressbook and an invitation to the opening in May 1977 because (along with Paul Chadwick and Dan Dorman) I was publishing an sf fanzine called Free Fall. Alas, I couldn’t use the invitation because I was falling in love with Janet in Scotland on the day of the premiere.

 I find your lack of faith disturbing. 

[Jul 1977]

“The Astronomical Hazards of the
Tobacco Habit”

by Dean McLaughlin
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Summer 1977

Whenever an effect of an action occurs before that action itself (i.e., an endochronic property), I consider it to be time travel, with the canonical example being Asimov’s Thiotimoline research first published in 1948. According to McLaughlin, Asimov continued that research, using the profits to establish a foundation that funds further research into such phenomena.

 Dr. Isaac Asimov
Director: Thiotimoline Research Foundation
Trantor MA31416
 

[Aug 1977]

“Rotating Cylinders and the Possibility of Global Causality Violation”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Analog, Aug 1977
A mathematician named Quifting has a way to use a time machine to end the war with the Hallane Regency once and for all.

 Did nobody ever finish one of these, ah, time machines? 

[Jul 2013]

“Joelle”
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Fall 1977
Canadian Eruc Stranathan is one of the few people in the world who can merge his mind with computer hardware, taking him to mental vistas beyond that of mere humans. At a conference to explore the possibilities of the technology, he meets the beautiful American Joelle who shares his ability. The two fall deeply in love, but because of security restrictions, it’s fifteen months before she can show him the capabilities of her mind-machine connection.

The time-travel connection is slight in this long story, but it is relevant to Joelle. As I read though, I wondered whether the story could have been much more had the time-travel element been taken more to heart.

 He swept out of the cell, through space and through time, at light-speed across unseen prairies, into the storms that raged down a great particle accelerator. 

[Sep 1977]
Freff’s interior drawing for the story
“Lorelei at Storyville West”
by Sherwood Spring
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Fall 1977
A writer who’s working on a book about Dixieland singers interviews the one man who might have a 1955 tape recording of Ruby Benton whose voice always drew comparisons to the most outstanding singer you&rsquo'd ever heard. The man does indeed have a recording as well as a theory about why Ruby disappeared from the clubs of Storyville West at the particular time she did.

 The tatoo was obviously her social security number, but it was preceded by an “A” and followed by a space and five additional digits. 

[Sep 1977]

The Orion Series
by Ben Bova
First story: Weird Heroes 8 (Nov 1977)
Orion the Hunter is tasked by mighty Ormazd to continually battle evil Ahriman, the Dark One. Bova’s first tale chronicles a time thousands of years in the past when Orion is part of a nomadic hunting clan that includes the beautiful Ana whom he has bonded with and loved throughout time.

 TitlePublication
Floodtide (Nov 1977)in Weird Heroes 8
Orion (1984)incorporates “Floodtide”
Vengeance of Orion (1988)
Orion in the Dying Time (1990)
Orion and the Conqueror    (1984)
Orion among the Stars (1995)
Legendary Heroes (Dec 1996)Dragon Magazine
Orion and King Arthur (2012)

 But even from this distance I could see she was the gray-eyed woman I had known in other eras; the woman I had loved, thousands of years in the future of this world. The woman who had loved me. 
—“Floodtide”, reprinted in the March 1983 Analog

[Jun 2013]



DC Superhero Cartoons
First time travel: 10 Dec 1977


As you know, I was forced to ban all post-1969 comic books from The List because comic books pretty much fell to pieces after that date. If I discover many more superhero cartoons like these ones, I will be forced to expand the ban.

 The Protector (10 Dec 1977)The All New Super Friends Hour
The Time Trap (30 Sep 1978)Challenge of the Super Friends
New Kids in Town (31 Oct 1998)Superman
The Savage Time (9 Nov 2002)Justice League
Day of the Dark Knight! (2 Jan 2009)Batman: The Brave and the Bold   

 It is the fifth century, A.D., the place is Britain, and I am Merlin Ambrosius. 
—“The Day of the Dark Knight!”, Episode 4 of Batman: The Brave and the Bold

[Aug 2013]

“Backspace”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Winter 1977
After fixing the smog problem by reversing the direction of Earth’s spin, Peter’s flaky friend Sam shows up with device that includes a calendar display and a grey button.

 Well, its the grey button. No—don’t touch it. 

[Jul 2015]
I lament that the sf zines of today have relatively few interior illustrations such as this pen and ink drawing by Roy G. Krenkel for Garrett’s story.
“On the Martian Problem”
by Randall Garrett
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Winter 1977
Ed’s “Uncle Jack’ writes to him with an explanation about why the recent Martian landers show such a different Mars than that which Jack himself has visited and written about.

Not to brag, but I knew the explanation all along.

 To the Reader of this Work:
In submitting Captain Carters strange manuscript to you in book form, I believe that a few words relative to this remarkable personality will be of interest.
My first recollection of Captain Carter is of the few months he spent at my fathers home in Virginia, just prior to the opening of the civil war. I was then a child of but five years, yet I well remember the tall, dark, smooth-faced, athletic man whom I called Uncle Jack.
. . .
very sincerely yours,
Edgar Rice Burroughs
 
—from the foreward to A Princess of Mars

[Jul 2015]

The Mirror
by Marlys Millhiser
First publication: 1978
In 1978, 20-year-old Boulder woman exchanges places with her grandmother on the eve of their respective weddings.

Janet and I read this in April, 2011.

 Here, at last, was the man in Grandma Brans wedding picture in the hall. 

[Apr 2011]
The story also appeared in this 1986 collection.
“Threads of Time”
aka “The Threads of Time”
by C.J. Cherryh
First publication: Darkover Grand Council Program Book IV, 1978
Although I’ve enjoyed many of Cherryh’s novels (first suggested to me by my academic advisor, David B. Benson), this particular vignette was a plotless mishmash of alien artifact time-gates and time cops patrolling the baddies who would wipe out history as we (or the qhal) would know it.

 But never go back. Never tamper. Never alter the past. 

[Apr 2014]
I’m not sure when this commemorative plate was issued for the cartoon.
A Connecticut Rabbit in King Arthur’s Court
produced, directed and plagiarized by Chuck Jones
First airing: 23 Feb 1978

This half-hour Warner Brother’s cartoon was shown on tv a few times and then released on VHS as Bugs Bunny in King Arthur’s Court. With the help of Way Bwadbuwy, Bugs finds himself in Camelot, whereupon he brings about a dragon-powered steampunk age.

 Never again—never, never again—do I take travel hints from Ray Bradbury! Huh! Him and his short cuts! 

[Jun 2011]

Mastodonia
aka Catface
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Mar 1978

Asa Steele buys a farm near his boyhood farm in southwestern Wisconsin where the loyal Bowser and his simple friend Hiram talk to a lonely time-traveling alien who opens time roads for the three of them.

 Maybe it takes gently crazy people and simpletons and dogs to do things we can’t do. Maybe they have abilities we don’t have.... 

[Dec 1979]

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
by Douglas Adams
First time travel: BBC Radio, 29 Mar 1978

Apart from the original radio programs that I listened to in Stirling on my study abroad, the travails of Arthur Dent dodging Vogons never inflamed my passion—and I’m not quite sure where time travel slipped into the further radio shows, books, tv shows, movies and video games (which I won’t list here, apart from noting Tim’s favorite quote from The Restaurant at the End of the Universe: “There was an accident with a contraceptive and a time machine. Now concentrate!” Still, those original radio shows got me laughing, including the first moment of time travel in the 4th episode.

The radio series spawned six books and at least one time-travel infused short story.

 The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1979)
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980)
Life, the Universe and Everything (1982)
So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (1984)
“Young Zaphod Plays It Safe” (1986)in The Hitchhiker’s Quartet
Mostly Harmless (1992)
And Another Thing... (2009)by Eoin Colfer

 For instance, at the very moment that Arthur Dent said, “I seem to be having this tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle,” a freak wormhole opened up in the fabric of the space-time continuum and carried his words far, far back in time across almost infinite reaches of space, to a distance galaxy where strange and war-like beings were poised on the brink of frightful interstellar battle. 
—from the 4th radio episode

[Mar 1978]

“Stalking the Timelines”
by Kevin O’Donnell, Jr.
First publication: Analog, Sep 1978
A catlike being lives the life of a soldier in many different times and places, but always with the same goal of stamping out war.

 ...but in all the lines Im big, tough, and smart enough to know how to take good orders and not hear bad ones. 

[Jun 2013]


Mork and Mindy lived at 1619 Pine Street in Boulder

Mork and Mindy
produced by Anthony W. Marshall and Garry Marshall
First time travel: 14 Sep 1978

According to Wikipedia, there is a scene in the first episode where Mork explains that he's traveling from the 1950s Happy Days to 1978—but that scene did not air until subsequent reruns. The other time travel that I know of is in the penultimate episode where the couple travel via Mork's ruby red, size eight, time-travel shoes.

 Wait! I have one last request! I would like to die with dignity, with honor,...and with my penny-loafers on. 

[Nov 2013]

“Fair Exchange?”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine, Fall 1978

John Sylva has invented a temporal transference device that allows his friend Herb to enter the mind of a man in 1871 London and to thereby attend three performances of a lost Gilbert & Sullivan play.

I read this story as I was starting my graduate studies in Pullman in 1978. Sadly, there was no second issue of Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine.

 We cant be sure how accurate our estimates of time and place are, but you seem to resonate with someone in London in 1871. 

[Sep 1978]

The Avatar
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Oct 1978

No, this book has nothing to do with Cameron’s more widely-known movie, although critics have noted a similarity between the movie and an earlier Anderson story, “Call Me Joe.” As for The Avatar, it’s a political story of time-space portals (Tipler cylinders known in the book as T-machines) left behind by the “Others.” Wealthy Daniel Broderson wants to use results of a portal exploration team for the benefit of all mankind, while the authoritarian leaders of Earth thinks that mankind isn’t ready for the full truth.

The title avatar of Anderson’s book is present as one of the portal exploration team members right from the start of the goings-on, but the name avatar isn’t used until the conclusion of the book—and the meaning of the word is the one that predates our modern digital view.

 For us, approximately eight Terrestrial years have passed. It turns out that the T-machine is indeed a time machine of sorts, as well as a space transporter. The Betans—the beings whom we followed—calculated our course to bring us out near the date when we left. 

[Jun 2015]

“Time Warp”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Omni, Oct 1978

On the hidden planet of Ceer, Althair tells all the little pups and pammies of the time when he accompanied the brave Will Hawkins and the chief pilot Jonna Verret as they traveled back in time to save Earth from the Meercaths from Orel who had the power to blow up the Earth and would use it whether the Earthlings revealed the secret of time travel or not.

In my first semester of graduate school, I bought the first issue of Omni, which included this story. But I forgot about it until Bill Seabrook (a baseball fan and sf reader from Tyne-and-Wear) sent me a pointer to this story as well as J.B. Priestley’s time plays.

 Well arrive on Orel before they leave and stop them. 

[Sep 1978]

Superman: The Movie
by Mario Puzo, et. al. (Richard Donner, director)
First release: 12 Oct 1978


The humor didn’t quite click for me, but I did enjoy other parts including Christopher Reeve, Gene Hackman, the John Williams score, and a well-presented Superman mythos including his first time-travel rebellion against the don’t-mess-with-history edict of Jor-El.

 In times of fear and confusion, the job of informing the public was the responsibility of the Daily Planet, a great metropolitan newspaper whose reputation for clarity and truth had become the symbol for hope in the city of Metropolis... 

[Oct 1978]

Classics Illustrated’s The Time Machine
adapted by Wallace C. Bennett
First aired: 5 Nov 1978 (made-for-tv movie)



For me, the updated framing took this made-for-tv movie too far away from the original novel, and the production values were so low that it never got much airing, even if we do get looks at pilgrim witch hunts, the old west, and a dreamy Weena who speaks English.

 In tonights Classics Illustrated presentation, a young scientist hurtles the barrier of time and finds himself locked in a struggle to prevent the destruction Earth in the world of the future—an exciting new version of H.G. Wells’s masterpiece, The Time Machine. 

[Jul 2012]

“The Humanic Complex”
by Ray Russell
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1978
An amnesiac receives a visit from a tiny creature from the future who offers to grant him any three wishes he wants, but somehow the wishes keep being deflected in a theological direction.

 This may sound pompous, but...I wish to know whether or not there is a God. 

[Jul 2013]

“Palely Loitering”
by Christopher Priest
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 1979
At age ten, Mykle jumps off the time-flux bridge at a sharp angle and goes far into the future where he sees a lovely girl named Estyll, and as he grows older, he is drawn to the future and to her over and over again.

 One of these traversed the Channel at an angle of exactly ninety degrees, and to walk across it was no different from crossing any bridge across any ordinary river.
One bridge was built slightly obtuse of the right-angle, and to cross it was to climb the temporal gradient of the flux-field; when one emerged on the other side of the Channel, twenty-four hours had elapsed.
The third bridge was built slightly acute of the right-angle, and to cross to the other side was to walk twenty-four hours into the past. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow existed on the far side of the Flux Channel, and one could walk at will among them.
 

[Jul 2013]

Happy Days
created by Garry Marshall
First time travel: 6 Mar 1979

Some time after this show jumped the shark, Mork (who made his first appearance here in a 1978 episode) returns from the 70s to visit Richie and the gang, where they want to know about cars and girls of the future.

 In 1979...both are faster. 

[Nov 2013]

“Loob”
by Bob Leman
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1979

Tom Perman remembers his home town differently, but in his actual life, the town is run-down and neither his grandmother nor her elegant house exist—a situation Tom can explain only through changes made to the past by loob, the town idiot; although ironically, it’s only through those changes that Loob himself even exists.

 Their only dreams are of winning prizes on television giveaway shows. 

[May 2014]

“The Agent”
by Christopher Priest with David Redd
First publication: Aries 1, 28 Jun 1979
Egon Rettmer—citizen of neutral Silte, but an agent for the Nord-Deutschland in their war against the Masurians—uses time travel for his communiques and, as he realizes on the eve of the N-D invasion, theres the potention to use it for more, maybe even to get a good start with that entrancing visitor, Heidi.

 She was behaving towards him, literally, as if he had been in two places at once...as if, this morning, he had met her and told her of the escape plans he had only half started to form a few minutes ago! 

[Jul 2013]

Kindred
by Octavia E. Butler
First publication: Jul 1979

Dana Franklin, a 26-year-old African-American woman living in modern-day California, finds herself transported back to the antebellum south whenever young redheaded Rufus is in trouble.

 Fact then: Somehow, my travels crossed time as well as distance. Another fact: The boy was the focus of my travels—perhaps the cause of them. 

[Nov 2013]

“The Merchant of Stratford”
by Frank Ramirez
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 1979
The world’s first time traveler sets out to visit a retired Will Shakespeare, carrying a long a case of books that he hopes will be a unique treat for the immortal bard.

 In my storage case were volumes for his perusal—a concise history of the world through the year 2000, a selection of the greatest poets since the master, selected volumes of Shakespearean criticism, and the massive one-volume Armstead Shakespeare, the definitive Shakespeare, published in 1997. 

[Sep 2014]

Xanth
by Piers Anthony
First time travel: Jul 1979

Deborah Baker first introduced me to this series of books in 1982, and I read the first nine in the 1980s. The books are set in a pun-infested world in which people have individual magic powers that they must discover. The first time travel that I remember was in the 1979 Castle Roogna where characters could step into a tapestry that took them to the past.

 It was embroidered with scenes from the ancient past of Castle Roogna and its environs, eight hundred years ago. 

[Sep 1982]

Time after Time
by Nicholas Meyer, Karl Alexander and Steve Hayes (Meyer, director)
First release: 31 Aug 1979

Apart from the hero in The Time Machine movie, this is the earliest that I’ve seen of the “H.G. Wells as time traveler” subgenre. Our hero chases Jack the Ripper into the 20th century.

 Ninety years ago I was a freak; today I am an amateur. 
—Jack the Ripper in the twentieth century

[Sep 1979]

Roadmarks
by Roger Zelazny
First publication: Oct 1979

As Red Dorakeen tries to avoid assassination, he travels on a highway that links all times via mutable exits that appear every few years.

There are other Zelazny works that drew me in much deeper (try Seven Princes of Amber). Still, Roadmarks has some interesting techniques. For example, Zelazny said that the second of the two storylines, which take place off the Road, was written as separate chapters and then shuffled into no particular order.

 It traverses Time—Time past, Time to come, Time that could have been and Time that might yet be. It goes on forever, so far as I know, and no one knows all of its turnings. 

[Aug 2012]

“Life Trap”
by Barrington J. Bayley
First publication: The Seed of Life, Nov 1979
Marcus, an aspirant to the highest rank afforded to members of the Arcanum Temple, undergoes an experiment to determine what awaits us after death, and the answer certainly involves time in a macabre manner.

 Although the secret of death has been imparted to the full membership of the Temple, not all have understood its import. 

[Apr 2014]

“Closing the Timelid”
by Orson Scott Card
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1979
Centuries in the future, Orion throws an illicit party in which the partygoers get to experience complete death in the past.

 Ah, agony in a tearing that made him feel, for the first time, every particle of his body as it screamed in pain. 

[Jul 2004]


Sadly, Galactica 1980 had neither Laurette Spang...

...nor Jane Seymour

Galatica 1980
created by Glen A. Larson
First time travel: 10 Feb 1980


I eagarly awaited the reboot of Battlestar Galactica in 1980, shortly before I left to join my soon-to-be wife in England. Sadly, the reboot was a disappointment: poor plots, poor characters, the same few seconds of special effects and explosions endlessly repeated—and not even Cassiopeia (Laurette Spang, whom I was in love with in 1978) or Serina (Jane Seymour, whom I am in love with now).

However, I later discovered one redeeming feature: Time travel in Part Three of the 1980 Galactica pilot show, when the warriers follow an evil scientist back to 1944 and foil his plot to give modern technology to the Nazis. I think this was the only hint of time travel in the Galactica franchise, although the same future wife whom I went to meet in 1980 now tells me that this bit of time travel may have planted a seed in writer Donald P. Bellisario for his later series, Quantum Leap.

 The great ship Galactica, majestic and loving, strong and protecting, our home for these many years we endured the wilderness of space. And now we near the end of our journey. Scouts and electronic surveillance confirm that we have reached our haven, that planet which is home to our ancestor brothers. Too many of our sons and daughters did not survive to share the fulfillment of our dream. We can only take comfort and find strength in that they did not die in vain. We have at last found Earth. 

[Jan 2013]

Thrice Upon a Time
by James P. Hogan
First publication: Mar 1980

In answer to his least favorite question, James Hogan explained (in the Jan 2006 Analog) that the idea for this novel came from an all night conversation with Charles Sheffield about the classic time-travel paradox of what happens if you send something back in time and the arrival of that thing is the very cause of you not sending said thing back in time. Much of the novel is a similar conversation between physicist Murdoch Ross, his friend Lee, and Murdoch’s Nobel Prize winning grandfather Charles who has invented a way to send messages through time.

 Suppose your grandfathers right. What happens to free will? If you can send information backward through time, you can tell me what I did even before I get around to doing it. So suppose I choose not to? 

[Sep 2012]

Martin Gardner’s SF Puzzles
by Martin Gardner
First time travel: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 1980
Growing up, I read every Martin Gardner science book that I could lay my hands on. Janet even claims that I ignored her on our honeymoon in order to read Gardner’s Relativity for the Million (which is not true—it was The Ambidextrous Universe). Gardner was a colleague and friend of Asimov’s, which led to a series of sf puzzle stories beginning in the first issue of IASFM and continuing through November of 1986. As I spot various time travel adventures in these puzzles, I’ll add them to the list below.

 The Backward Banana (Jul 1980)Bananas grow younger

 Somewhere in the text is a block of letters which taken forward spell the last name of a top science fiction author who has written about time travel. 
—from “The Backward Banana”

[1980]

“A Touch of Petulance”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Dark Forces, Aug 1980
On his way home on the train, Jonathan Hughes meets Jonathan Hughes + 20 years and receives a warning that his marriage to a lovely young bride will end in murder.

 Me, thought the young man. Why, that old man is ... me. 

[Mar 2012]

The Final Countdown
by Hunter, Powell, Ambrose, Davis (Peter Vincent Douglas, director)
First release: 1 Aug 1980

Observer Warren Lasky is aboard the U.S.S. Nimitz when a storm takes her back to World War II, and then they are returned to the present before they can do anything vaguely cool.

 Today is December 7, 1941. Im sure we are all aware of the significance of this date in this place in history. We are going to fight a battle that was lost before most of you were born. This time, with Gods help, its going to be different.... Good Luck. 

[Dec 1990]



The Muppet Show
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 5 Aug 1980


The most excellent Muppet Show, its successor Muppets Tonight, the short Muppet Movie Mania episodes, and the online From the Balcony couldn't totally ignore time travel.

 Chris Langham (5 Aug 1980)working on a time travel aparatus
Michelle Pfeiffer, (8 Mar 1996)Dr. Honeydew bippie time manipulation
The Kerminator (1999)The title says it all.
From the Balcony #27, (Jun 2006)Superman reverses time

 Aparatus travel time a its. Moment the at on working Im what is this. Hello! 
—Guest host Chris Langham

[Aug 1980]

“Appointment on the Barge”
by Jack Ritchie
First publication: Microcosmic Tales, Sep 1980
After Professor Bertoldt delivers a speech about his theories on how to send a person back to an earlier incarnation, he gets two visitors wanting to go back in time because they claim to be Cleopatra and Anthony.

 I have hesitated to use a human until I can be positive that no psychic harm will result to my subject. However, I do believe that last week I did succeed in sending a chimpanzee back several generations. How far back, I can't be certain. We had a bit of difficulty in communication. 

[Jul 2013]
German edition of Microcosmic Tales
“Murder in the Nth Degree”
by R.A. Montana
First publication: Microcosmic Tales, Sep 1980
An insurance agent from Cleveland is selected as the representative of Earth in a galactic trial for multiple crimes against life, but it’s not until the verdict that you’ll see the time travel angle.

 Representative? Im an insurance agent from Cleveland, Ohio! I got a wife and three kids and about the worst thing Ive ever done was voting Republican in the last election. How can I be a representative? 

[Jul 2013]
1992 paperback edition
“Package Deal”
by Donald Franson
First publication: Microcosmic Tales, Sep 1980
Vernon Lewis has a theoretical idea for a time machine, but no money to build it, so he hatches a plan to send himself various money-making artifacts from the future and use the money to build the machine that will send the items back—and one day, in the afternoon mail, the package arrives.

 He ripped the tape off, unwrapped the brown paper. There it was—an almanac. 

[Jul 2013]

Cosmos: A Personal Journey
presented by Carl Sagan
First publication: 28 Sep 1980


Carl Sagan’s original 13-part PBS series introduced us to the Ship of the Imagination. Although it was used only in the first episode, each of the other episodes also took us on a journey through space and time.

 Were going to explore the Cosmos in a ship of the imagination, unfetered by ordinary limits on speed and size, drawn by the music of cosmic harmonies: It can take us anywhere in space and time. 

[Sep 1982]

The Number of the Beast
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Oct 1980



Semi-mad scientist Jake Burroughs, his beautiful daughter Deety, her strong love interest Zeb Carter, and Hilda Corners (“Aunt Hilda” if you prefer) use Gay Deceiver to visit many time periods in many universes (including that of Lazurus Long), soon realizing the true nature of the world as multiperson pantheistic solipsism.

 Sharpie, you have just invented multiperson pantheistic solipsism. I didnt think that was mathematically possible. 

[Dec 1980]

“Prairie Sun”
by Edward Bryant
First publication: Omni, Oct 1980
On the Oregon trail west of Laramie in 1850, 13-year-old Micah Taverner asks two scavenger men from the future to cure his sister Annie from the smallpox.

Janet and I heard this read by James Whiteman in 2004 at a series of dramatic readings called Colorado Homegrown Tales. The other stories at the February session were “Hungry” by Steve Rasnic Tem, “The Dream of Houses” by Wil McCarthy, and my own “Childrey Green” read by Debbie Knapp.

 The road was lined with all manner of belongings thrown away by the exhausted, overburdened men and women barely halfway along their arduous journey. 

[Feb 2004]

Somewhere in Time
by Richard Matheson (Jeannot Szwarc, director)
First release: 3 Oct 1980

A woman presses a pocketwatch into a man’s hand, beseeching him to come find her in time, so he does.

Wayne Winsett, owner of Time Warp Comics, tells me that this is his favorite time travel movie. I can’t argue with his predilection for Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour.

 Come back to me. 

[Dec 1990]

“The Final Days”
by David Langford
First publication: A Spadeful of Spacetime, Feb 1981
During an important presidential election between the slick Harman and the less polished Ferris, scientists detect eyes that are watching Harman from the future, perhaps because he is fated to be such an important political figure.

 The people have this hint of the winning side, as they might from newspaper predictions or opinion polls—but the choice remains theirs, a decisions which we politicians humbly accept. 

[Apr 2014]

Star Trek: The Entropy Effect
by Vonda N. McIntyre
First publication: Jun 1981


Spock and the rest of the crew of the Enterprise transport a time-traveling criminal, Dr. Georges Mordreaux, between planets.

 The effort required to change an event is proportional to the square of its distance in the past. The curve of a power function approaches infinity rather quickly. 

[Nov 2013]

“On the Nature of Time”
by Barry N. Malzberg and Bill Pronzini
First publication: Amazing, Sep 1981
A boy grows up hating his father; hence, when he invents a time machine, he uses it to go back and kill his father before his own conception.

 When I was sixteen I wished that the dream of my fathers murder had not been a dream at all. 

[Nov 1981]

Superbook
by Akiyoshi Sakai
First episode: 1 Oct 1981

Young Chris Peeper finds a magic Bible that transports him, his friend Joy, and his robot Gizmo back to Old Testament happenings. The first run was anime, followed by a second run of 3-D CGI animation.

 ♫ Chris and Joy and everyone were having lots of fun. Superbook fell off the shelf: look what theyve done. When it hit the computer, oh, they were surprised. Superbook got programmed in; now its computerized.♫  

[Aug 2013]

Time Bandits
by Terry Gilliam and Michael Palin (Gilliam director)
First release: 6 Nov 1981

A boy’s bedroom is invaded by six midgets who have stolen The Almighty One’s map which then leads the whole lot of them on adventures through time.

 Is it all ready? Right. Come on then. Back to creation. We mustnt waste any more time. Theyll think Ive lost control again and put it all down to evolution. 

[Dec 2010]

“Fish Night”
by Joe Lansdale
First publication: Specter!, 1982
Rather more frequently than I’d like, it’s hard to tell whether a story involves time travel or not. This could just be a ghost fish story, but there are some indications that the old toothless door-to-door salesman might be traveling back to the time of the early fish.

 Millions and millions of years ago this desert was sea bottom. Maybe even the birthplace of man. Who knows? 

[Apr 2014]

“The Winds of Change”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Speculations: 17 Stories..., 1982

Jonas Dinsmore is not half the physicist as his colleagues, the politically astute Adams and the brilliant Muller, but in their presence, he claims to have figured out how to interpret Muller’s Grand Unified Theory to allow time travel.

 Time-travel, in the sense of going backward to change reality, is not only technologically impossible now, but it is theoretically impossible altogether. 

[Jul 1995]

Miss Switch to the Rescue
created by Barbara Brooks Wallace
First aired: 16 Jan 1982

After the Miss Switch children’s book and cartoon, there was a longer ABC Weekend Special (“Miss Switch to the Rescue”) where a pirate whos been stuck in a bottle for centuries takes one of Miss Switchs students (Amelia) back to his time, and the teacher-cum-witch and another student (Rupert) go back to rescue her.

 Kinda mysterious, aint it, Amelia. 

[Aug 2013]

“Clap Hands and Sing”
by Orson Scott Card
First publication: The Best of Omni Science Fiction 3, Feb 1982
Ancient Charlie sees a momentary vision of young Rachel, barely into her teens, and the moment with her that was never to be.

I’ve read other Card stories where he portrays the dark side of a character in realistic and frightening form that I could deal with, but for me, the seeming comfort that the character gets at the end is more disturbing than anything else Card has written.

 He almost stops himself. Few things are left in his private catalog of sin, but surely this is one. He looks into himself and tries to find the will to resist his own desire solely because its fulfillment will hurt another person. He is out of practice—so far out of practice that he keeps losing track of the reason for resisting. 

[Jun 2015]



The Oxford Time-Traveling Historians
by Connie Willis
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 15 Feb 1982

In the first short story of the series, an Oxford graduate student travels back to the World War II bombing of St. Paul’s for his history practicum. This launched a series of novels, the first of which has Kivrin Engle being sent to 14th century England, but when she arrives, she can’t remember where and when her pickup will be. The second book incorporated more comedy, and the last two returned to World War II.

 Fire Watch (15 Feb 1982)Asimovs
The Doomsday Book (1992)Kivrin Engle to 1320 Oxford
To Say Nothing of the Dog (1998)   Ned Henry to 1888 Oxford
Blackout (2010)Michael, Polly and Merope to WW II England
All Clear (2010)continuation of Blackout

 “But Im not ready,” Id said. “Look, it too me four years to get ready to travel with St Paul. St Paul. Not St Pauls. You cant expect me to get ready for London in the Blitz in two days.” 

[Dec 1993]

The Flying House
directed by Masakazu Higuchi and Mineo Fuji
First episode: 5 Apr 1982

While playing in the woods, Justin Casey and his pals Angie and Corkey stumble upon a house owned by Professor Humphrey Bumble and his robot Solar Ion, whereupon the professor reveals that the house is a time machine and the entire gang visits various Biblical happenings from the New Testament.

 ♫ We were having fun, playing hide-and-seek, then a summer storm appeared. Corkey got afraid, when it started to rain, then we came upon a house—should we go insiiiiide? ♫  

[Aug 2013]

Voyagers!
created by James D. Parriott
First episode: 3 Oct 1982

Bright, young orphan Jeffrey and ladies’ man Phineas Bogg leap from one moment in history to another, righting those moments that have gone wrong in this Quantam Leap progenitor.

 This isnt 1942. Wheres Columbus, kid? 

[Apr 2011]

“Good Golly, Miss Molly”
by Steven Bryan Bieler
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1982
When Dr. Demented Physicist Particle Breakdown bets his entire life savings on a horse race and the campus’s best handicapper picks Miss Molly instead, the good Dr. Breakdown has no choice but to further handicap Miss Molly.

 Locating his car, Dr. Breakdown extracted from the trunk a Phillips-head screwdriver, a toothbrush, his spare tire, five felt pens, and a plumbers helper. With these materials he constructed a duplicate of the time machine in the university physics lab. 

[Aug 2013]

The Fonz and the Happy Days Gang
narrated by Wolfman Jack
First publication: 8 Nov 1982

Before Marty McFly went to the 50s, this 50s gang traveled through time using a time machine brought to them by a future chick name o’ Cupcake, all in 24 episodes where they desperately try to get back to 1957 Milwaukee.

 Oh, now the gang got zapped into that time machine, and theyre, like, travelin through time. My, my, they do not dig where that machine is goin, but they sure hope to get back to 1957 Milwaukee! 

[Aug 2013]

Timerider: The Adventure of Lyle Swann
by Michael Nesmith (William Dear, director)
First release: 11 Dec 1982

Now that I know that one of the Monkees wrote this time-travel yarn (motorcycle racer goes back to the old west), the universe begins to make sense.

 You shot it. What a bunch of dumb sons of bitches. You shot it—a machine, you butt-heads! 

[Apr 2011]

A Rebel in Time
by Harry Harrison
First publication: Feb 1983
Lt. Troy Harmon, a black army sergeant, follows Colonel McCulloch back to 1859 to prevent the colonel from giving modern-day technology to the South.

 “Then you are also telling me that down there among all that stuff—that you have built a time machine?”
“Well, I think...” She smiled brightly. “Why, yes, I suppose that we have.”
 

[Jul 1985]

“As Time Goes By”
by Tanith Lee
First publication: Chrysalis 10, Apr 1983
The narrator tells of a time travel paradox where a girl of fifteen meets Day Curtis who has come from a disaster that’s still another sixteen years in the future—and she returns to the scene years later to warn him.

 Let me prompt you. Youre dead, Curtis. Or you will be. 

[May 2014]

Millennium
by John Varley
First publication: Jun 1983

When the snatchers leave two stun guns in the 20th century, we see the story from the viewpoints of Louise Baltimore (Mandy’s boss) and Bill Smith (head of an NTSB investigation, no relation to Woodrow “Bill” Smith so far as I know).

 The crew had to stun just about everybody. The only bright spot was the number wed managed to shuffle through during the thinning phase. The rest would have to go through on our backs. 

[Dec 2010]

“Needle in a Timestack”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Playboy, Jun 1983
Nick Mikklesen and his wife Janine know that Janine’s ex-husband is out to break up their marriage by alterning the past.

 In the old days, when time was just a linear flow from then to now, did anyone get bored with all that stability? For better or for worse it was different now. You go to bed a Dartmouth man and wake up Columbia, never the wiser. You board a plane that blows up over Cyprus, but then your insurance agent goes back and gets you to miss the flight. 

[Apr 2014]

“Homefaring”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Phantasia Press, Jul 1983; and in Amazing, Nov 1983

A grand experiment takes McCulloch into the mind and body of an intelligent creature—an intelligent giant lobster—of the far future.

 “It is not painful to have a McCulloch within one,” his host was explaining. “It came upon me at molting time, and that gave me a moment of difficulty, molting being what it is. But it was only a moment. After that my only concern was for the McCullochs comfort.” 

[Jun 2012]

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe
created by Roger Sweet
First time travel: 12 Sep 1983


He-Man and his mighty battle cat possess fabulous super-powers in order to defend Castle Greyskull against the sometimes time-traveling Skeletor (and also to sell Mattel action figures).

 Time is delicate, He-Man; do your job swiftly. 

[Apr 2014]

“From Time to Time”
by Bruce Stanley Burdick
First publication: Analog, Oct 1983
With the universe nearing its end, Jinma Lor travels to an outpost to converse with antimatter beings whose sense of time is reversed from his own.

 It is possible that the direction in which the associated souls are traveling is always the orientation for which matter becomes more disorganized. 

[Jun 2013]

“Full Chicken Richness”
by Avram Davidson
First publication: Last Wave, Oct 1983
Every now and then, I’ll be reading a story, not really sure whether it’s meant to be sf or not, but realizing that it has a pleasant sfnal tone—and then, voila!, there’s time travel. Davidson’s story is a piece that lives on the edge between real and surreal, ostensibly telling the story of Fred Hopkins, an artist who puts old buildings on canvas and takes a late morning breakfast at La Bunne Burger.

 He read on: Ingredients: Water, Other Poultry and Poultry Parts, Dehydrated Vegetables, Chickens and Chicken Parts, seasoning . . . the list dribbled off into the usual list of chemicals. 

[Jul 2015]
General Robert E. Lee from the Oct 1983 Analog
“Quarks at Appomattox”
by Charles L. Harness
First publication: Analog, Oct 1983
Colonel von Mainz travels back from the 21st century to 1865 Appomattox with weapons that can make the South win the war and thereby keep America divided, allowing Germany to win the wars of the 20th century.

This is one of the stories that I read in my dad’s Analogs at the end of my tricycle trip to Seattle.

 I left the American sector of Berlin this morning, April 8, in the year two thousand five and sixty, almost exactly two hundred years in your future. I am indeed a colonel, but not in the Prussian army. I am a colonel in the Neues Schutz-Staffeln—the NSS—an underground paramilitary organization devoted to reuniting West and East Germany. 

[Jun 2013]

Caballo de Troya Series
by Juan José Benítez
First book: 1984

L.S. Thomas kindly sent me a copy of her English translation of the first of nine books about time travelers who visit the life of Christ. Another translation was written by Margaret Sayers Peden.

 The computer display read 23 hours, 3 minutes and 22 seconds on Thursday March 30 of the year 30. We had “traveled back” a total of 17,019,289 hours. 

[Aug 2013]

Norby Books
by Janet and Isaac Asimov
First time travel: 1984


In the second book of this children’s series (Norby’s Other Secret, 1984), the precocious robot reveals his time-travel powers to his pal Jeff; their mishaps in time continue in at least three later books (Norby and the Queen’s Necklace, Norby Finds a Villian, and Norby and Yobo’s Great Adventure).
[Jul 1985]

“The Toynbee Convector”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Playboy, Jan 1984

You’ll enjoy this story (which was also an episode of Ray Bradbury Theater), but I’ll give away no more beyond the quote below. By the way, if you get the original publication, you’ll also acquire the last nude photo of Marilyn Monroe, although (to my knowledge) she never traveled through time.

 What can I do to save us from ourselves? How to save my friends, my city, my state, my country, the entire world from this obsession with doom? Well, it was in my library late one night that my hand, searching along shelves, touched at last on an old and beloved book by H.G. Wells. His time device called, ghostlike, down the years. I heard! I understood. I truly listened. Then I blueprinted. I built. I traveled... 

[Mar 2012]

The Bunjee Venture
aka The Amazing Bunjee Venture
adapted by Malcolm Marmorstein
First aired: 24 Mar 1984


Karen and Andy’s dad builds a time machine (the last crucial part being their mom’s hair dryer), and the kids travel back to the prehistoric past to find new parents for orphaned Bunjee critter babies.

I like the ABC Weekend and Afternoon Specials. This is the second one that I saw with time travel. It’s based on a book by Stan McMurtry that I haven't yet seen, and there was a follow-on episode, “The Return of the Bunjee” in 1985.

 Ive created the ultimate scientific masterpiece. Ive done the impossible. Ive invented a time machine! 

[Aug 2013]

“Twilight Time”
by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1984

Travis goes back to 1961 and the dance where he met his now-departed sweetheart, but he also has memories of aliens who quietly took over the world.

 A decade of peace and quiet and short hair was winding down; a time when people knew their place and stayed in it. For ten years nobody had wanted anything but a new car and a bigger TV set. Now all that was about to change. In a little over a year the Cuban missile crisis would send thousands of people into their back yards to dig bomb shelters, and “advisors” would start pouring into Southeast Asia. In another year the president would be dead. 

[Jun 1984]

The Philadelphia Experiment
by Wallace C. Bennett, Charles Berlitz, et. al. (Stewart Rafill, director)
First release: 3 Aug 1984

Seaman David Herdeg and his pal are thrown from 1943 to 1984 during a naval experiment gone awry, and in that future, David is the only one who can save a missing town (provided he can dodge enough bullets and perhaps win the heart of the lovely Allison Hayes).

 Navy owes me 40 years back pay. 

[Jan 2011]

The Mackenzie Stories
by John Gribbin
First story: Analog, Sep 1984
Mackenzie, a researcher and problem solver who must continually justify his existence to his benefactor, is puzzled about why the things he sends back in time never reappear, but then in the first story (“Perpendicular Worlds,” Sep 1984 Analog) he starts thinking about Hawking black holes and Everett parallel worlds, and his work continues in a second story (“Random Variable,” Feb 1986 Analog) (although I prefer Gribbon’s science books).

 There must be as many different ways in which the world could have got into the state it is now as there are different ways in which it can develop into the future. 

[Jun 2013]

The Terminator
by James Cameron and William Wisher, Jr. (Cameron, director)
First release: 26 Oct 1984

Artificially intelligent machines from 2029 send a killer cyborg back to 1984 to kill the mother of John Connor because, in 2029, John will lead the resistance against the machines’ rule.

 Come with me if you want to live. 
—Kyle to Sarah at the Tech-Noir Club

[Oct 1984]

“Slan Libh”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Nov 1984
When Kevin O Malley’s home-built time machine becomes operable, he uses it to research his Irish ancestors during the potato blight of 1845.

 The past is changeable but self-correcting. Easy to change small things; harder to change big ones. 

[Jun 2013]

“The Life of Boswell”
by Jerry Oltion
First publication: Analog, Dec 1984
Michael Wagoner doesn't really want to be an English major and write poetry for the rest of his life, but what choice does he have—until the first day of his final semester when he meets a centerfold.

 All innocence, she turned to the middle, opened the gatefold, held it out sideways, then vertically. I dropped the beer when she shouted, “Grandma!” 

[Jun 2013]

“Hindsight”
by Harry Turtledove (as by Eric G. Iverson)
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1984
When 1950’s science fiction writer Mark Gordian has a flurry of great stories (“Watergate,” “Houston, We've Got a Problem,” “Neutron Star,” and the ultimate time-travel yarn, “All You Zombies”), Pete Lundquist has nothing but admiration, until Gordian comes out with a story that Pete himself has been outlining.

 “Oh, my God! Tet Offensive!” McGregor stared from one of them to the other. “Youre not telling me that ones based on fact?” 

[Jun 2013]

“Through Road No Wither”
by Greg Bear
First publication: Far Frontirs, Jan 1985
At a writers’ conference in Manhattan, KS, I was fortunate enough to sit beside the very kind and knowledgeable Greg Bear at the conference dinner, and I’ve enjoyed every piece of his fiction that I’ve read—but I simply didn’t understand this story any better than I understood its title. The story is set in an alternate version of 1984 where Hitler was victorious, and two lost SS officers come across a hag who (I think) sends them back in time.

 Your cities in flam, your women and children shriveling to black dolls in the heat of their burning homes. The death camps found and you stand accused of hideous crimes. 

[Dec 2013]

“Sailing to Byzantium”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Feb 1985

Charles Phillips is a 20th-century New Yorker in a 50th-century world of immortal leisurites who recreate cities from the past. The one item that you should find out for yourself, I’ll put into a cypher: rgwew ua bi runw relcwk~

 He knew very little about himself, but he knew that he was not one of them. That he knew. He knew that his name was Charles Phillips and that before he had come to live among these people he had lived in the year 1984, when there had been such things as computers and television sets and baseball and jet planes, and the world was full of cities, not merely five but thousands of them, New York and London and Johannesburg and Parks and Liverpool and Bangkok and San Franciscoand Buenos Ares and a multitude of others, all at the same time. 

[Mar 1985]

Trancers
by Danny Bilson and Paul DeMeo (Charles Band, director)
First release: 22 May 1985

In the first of the six (really!) Trancer movies, heroic trancer-hunter Jack Deth follows evil trancer-maker Martin Whistler from 2247 to 1985 via a drug-induced time-travel that can take you back to the body of an ancestor. What I don’t fully understand is how they blackmailed Helen Hunt to appear in the first three as Deth’s 1985 love interest, even though this was in her pre-Mad about You days.

 Greetings to the council. As you may have gathered, I have survived the pathetic trap set by Trooper Deth on Mecon 7. For twelve long years, you have hunted my disciples like dogs. Now, my day of vengence is at hand. Iv synthesized a time drug, and in a moment shall retreat down the dark corridors of history. Know that it is I who is solely responsible for your demise. One by one, your ancestors shall be murdered, and you, their progeny, shall cease to exist. Then shall I return, join my legion, and claim the seat of power for my own. Adieu...adieu... 

[Apr 2013]

Back to the Future
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 3 Jul 1985

Typical teenager Marty McFly meets Doc Brown for the first test of his DeLorean time machine, but when Libyan terrorists strike, things go awry, Marty and the DeLorean end up in 1955 where his parents are teens, and Doc must now send Marty back to the future.

 Next Saturday night, we’re sending you...back to the future! 

[May 1985]

1985 Pepsi Commercial
First aired: Summer 1985

 Relax, Smith. What could 12 oz. of Pepsi possibly change? 


My Science Project
by Jonathan R. Betuel (Betuel, director)
First release: 9 Aug 1985

Not even the support of a young Fisher Stevens (Gary’s friend Chuck from Early Edition) could rescue this story of a high school motorhead who steals a power-sucking, space-time transforming orb from a miltary base for his science project.

 Now that sounds like were dealing with a time-space warp. 

[Mar 2013]

Contact
by Carl Sagan
First publication: Sep 1985

Sagan’s philosophical opus centers around Dr. Ellie Arrowway, the discovery of a radio message from Vega, and the subsequent building of a machine in accordance with directions in the message. A key twist in the plot requires Ellie to briefly posit time travel as the only explanation that fits her scientific viewpoint.

 You know, its not called a space-time continuum for nothing. If they can make tunnels through space, I suppose they can make some kind of tunnels through time. 

[Jul 2012]



“Mozart in Mirrorshades”
by Bruce Sterling and Lewis Shiner
First publication: Omni, Sep 1985
Time travelers are pilfering 18th century resources and generally polute their century with pieces of modern culture.

And a little bone to pick, not with this story, but with Harry Turtledove, editor of The Best Alternate History Stories of the 20th Century, which includes this story. I suppose he’s just marketing the book with a title that he supposes will sell, but I would like a clear distinction drawn between alternate history (What if...the South won the war?), time travel (such as this story), and true history (such as the true story of how Asimov met Campbell).

 At first Sutherland hadnt wanted Rice at the meeting with Jefferson. But Rice knew a little temporal physcis, and Jefferson had been pestering the American personnel with questions about time holes and parallel worlds. 

[Dec 2013]

Transformers Cartoons
created by Takara Tomy
First time travel: 24 Oct 1985

Two groups of robots who crashed to Earth in the distant past have returned to life and are making Earth—past and present— their battleground. These are the time-travel cartoon episodes that I spotted in the four original seasons (1984-1987) and in the Beast Wars episodes (1996-1999) in which time travel was commonplace. I haven’t seen the later series [Robots in Disguise (2000-2002), the Unicron Trilogy (2001-2006), the more recent animated series (2007-2010), and the webisodes (2010)].

 Dinobot Island, Part 2 (26 Sep 1985)
A Decepticon...King Arthur’s Court (24 Oct 1985)}
Forever Is a Long Time Coming (8 Oct 1986)
Beast Wars, Part 1 (16 Sep 1996)
Code of Hero (9 Mar 1998)
The Agenda, Part 3 (13 Mar 1998)
Optimal Situation (25 Oct 1998)
Cutting Edge (15 Nov 1998)
Other Victories (5 Mar 1999)
Nemesis, Part 2 (7 Mar 1999)

 They were called Autobots and Decepticons. But the brutal Decepticons were driven by a single goal: total domination. They set out to destroy the peace-loving Autobots, and a war between the forces of good and evil raged across Cybertron. 

[Mar 2014]

“Under Siege”
by George R.R. Martin
First publication: Omni, Oct 1985


After a nuclear war, Americans attempt to prevent the rise of Russia at the outset of the 19th century by traveling back to that time and inhabiting the bodies of key Finnish and Swedish military men during the siege of Sveaborg.

 He began to babble about Sveaborg, about the importance of what we are doing here, about the urgent need to change something, somehow, to prevent the Soviet Union from ever coming into existence, and thus forestall the war that has laid the world to waste. 

[Apr 2014]

The Cat Who Walks Through Walls
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Nov 1985



Richard Ames doesn’t like the fact that a new acquaintance was killed while dining at his table. Killed, why? and by whom? and why won’t that cat stay put? The eventual answers could lead Richard to Lazarus Long, the Time Corps, and more multiperson pantheistic solipsism.

 My darling had planned a pianissimo approach: Live for a time on Tertius (a heavenly place), get me hooked on multiverse history and time travel theory, et cetera. Not crowd me about signing up, but depend on the fact that she and Gretchen and Ezra and others (Uncle Jock, e.g.) were in the Corps...until I asked to be allowed to be sworn in. 

[Dec 1985]

The Twilight Zone (2nd Series)
created by Rod Serling
First time travel: 6 Jan 1985


Three seasons with 7 time-travel episodes. Harlan Ellison was a consultant on the series that included an adaptation of his “One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty.” The series also adapted Sturgeon’s “Yesterday Was Monday’, altering the plot and renaming it to “A Matter of Minutes,” and George R.R. Martin did the script for the time-travel episode “The Once and Future King” based on an idea submitted by Bryce Maritano.

 One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty (6 Dec 1985)   Hero to his childhood
A Matter of Minutes (24 Jan 1986)From 9:33 AM to 11:37 AM
Profile in Silver (7 Mar 1986)Kennedy in 1963
The Once and Future King (27 Sep 1986)Elvis in 1954
The Junction (21 Feb 1987)To 1912
Time and Teresa Golowitz (10 Jul 1987)Hero to his youth
Extra Innings (1 Oct 1988)Baseball in 1910

 Let the record show that in any age—good or bad—there are men of high ideals: men of courage, men who do more than that for which they are called upon. You will not always know their names. But let their deeds stand as monuments, so that when the human race is called to judgment, we may say, ‘This too was humanity!’ 
—JFK in “Profile in Silver”

[Sep 1985]

Conrad Stargard’s Adventures
by Leo Frankowski
First book: Feb 1986


Conrad Stargard, 20th century Polish engineer, stumbles through a time portal that was accidentally left open by those meddlers in the Historical Corps, and finds himself in 13th century Poland, whereupon he does any Connecticut Yankee proud.

One night when we were playing duplicate bridge, Bryan Campbell told me that this was the favorite time-travel series of a friend of his, which goes to show that just because my rating of a story is low, doesn’t mean that you (or Bryan’s friend) won’t enjoy it.

 The Cross-Time Engineer (Feb 1986)
The High-Tech Knight (Mar 1989)
The Radiant Warrior (Jul 1989)
The Flying Warlord (Oct 1989)
Lord Conrad’s Lady (Sep 1990)
Conrad’s Quest for Rubber (Dec 1998)
Conrad’s Time Machine (Sep 2002)
Lord Conrad’s Crusade (Aug 2005)

 “This country and this century are in horrible shape because of the lack of socialism!”
   “You are absolutely right, Sir Conrad! What is socialism?”
 

[Jun 2012]

“The Pure Product”
by John Kessel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Mar 1986

A cynical psychopath from the future takes a road trip (sometimes with random blood, sometimes with trite tripping) across 20th-century North America.

 “I said, have you got something going,” she repeated, still with the accent—the accent of my own time. 

[Jul 2011]

Highway of Eternity
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: June 1986

Jay Corcoran and Tom Boone are trying to track down a missing client when the building they are in is demolished and the two of them jump into a time machine that takes them to one of the pockets of rebels from the far future who are resisting the decorporealization of man.

 Horace, the hardheaded, practical lout, the organizer, the schemer. Emma, the moaner, the keeper of our consciences. Timothy, the student. Enid, the thinker. And I, the loafer, the bad example, the one who makes the others feel virtuous. 

[Jun 2012]

Flight of the Navigator
by Mark H. Baker, Michael Burton, Matt MacManus (Kleiser, director)
First release: 30 Jul 1986

Twelve-year-old David Freeman stumbles down a ravine and wakes up eight years later without having aged, but that’s not the time travelin’, which occurs only after he becomes the pilot of a small space ship that’s been collecting specimens from around the galaxy.

Janet said that I had to mention I fell asleep during this one.

 This is totally rad. Youre like my big little brother. 

[Jun 2012]

Lazer Tag Academy
produced by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears
First episode: 13 Sep 1986

Young Jamie Jaren, the Lazer Tag champion of 3010, travels back to 1980 to protect her distant teenaged ancestors from the evil Draxon Drear who was unwittingly released into that earlier era.

 As Drear races through time in his quest to conquer the future, he is pursued by Jamie Jaren. Jamie must team with her ancestors Tom, Beth and Nicky Jaren. Join us now in their adventure through time to preserve the past, save the future, and keep the peace established by...the Lazer Tag Academy! 

[Aug 2013]

Peggy Sue Got Married
by Jerry Leichtling and Arlene Sarner (Coppola, director)
First release: 10 Oct 1986

Middle-aged Peggy Sue has two grown children and an adulterous husband whom she married at 18, so will she do things the same when she finds herself back in 1960 in her senior year of high school?

 Well, Mr Snelgrove, I happen to know that in the future I will not have the slightest use for algebra, and I speak from experience. 

[Oct 2010]

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
by Steve Meerson, Peter Krikes, Nicholas Meyer, Have Bennett, Leonard Nimoy
First release: 26 Nov 1986

As the brave crew of the Enterprise are returning to Earth to stand trial for the events of the previous movie, Spock determines that Earth’s demise is imminent unless they can return to 1986 and retrieve a humpback whale (which they then proceed to do).

I saw this in the theater with Deb Baker and Jon Shultis during a winter trip to Pittsburgh for a small computer science education conference.

 McCoy: You realize that by giving him the formula you’re alterning the future.
Scotty: Why? How do we know he didnt invent the thing? 

[Dec 1986]

Muppet Babies
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 27 Dec 1986


As babies, all the muppets are occasionally looked after by Nannie. They first time traveled by taking Gonzo’s supersonic snowmobile trike back to rescue Nanny’s ruined yearbook in “Back to the Nursery.”

 Back to the Nursery (27 Dec 1986)trike to the past
Romancing the Weirdo (11 Nov 1989)a time machine in Gonzo’s novel
The Next Generation (15 Sep 1990)Rowlf visits his future grandson

 But how can we replace a picture taken a zillion years ago? 
—“Back to the Nursery”

[Dec 1986]

“Le gouffre des années”
aka “The Gulf of the Years”
by Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud
First publication: Le héroes blessé au bras, 1987
I read the English translation from Châteaureynaud’s collection, A Life on Paper (2010). The story tells of a man who returns to occupied France during World War II on the morning that his mother was killed by an errant bomb. I enjoyed the writing, but was unsatisfied with the ending.

 Youre Jean-Jacques Manoir, arent you? Right? You dont know me, but I know all about you. 

[Apr 2014]

A Handful of Time
by Kit Pearson
First publication: 1987

When twelve-year-old Patricia is sent to Western Ontario for the summer to let her parents sort out a divorce agreement, she is bored and ostracized by her cousins until she finds a pocketwatch that takes her back to the time when her mother was twelve. Actually, Patricia only views the past, so perhaps this isn’t time travel, but never mind because this was Hannah’s favorite book pre-HP.

 The wind in the trees sounded like rain. Patricia shivered and drew the flannelette sheets and heavy satin quilt closer around her neck. She didnt get to sleep for a long time. 

[Dec 1998]

Project Pendulum
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: 1987

Ricky and Sean Gabrielson, 23-year-old identical twins, are the first men to travel through time, taking ever larger swings that send one backward and one forward.

This was the first book that I read in the rare books room of the University of Colorado library from the Brian E. Lebowitz Collection of 20th Century Jewish American Literature.

 Hi there. Youre not going to believe this, but Im you of the year 2016, taking part in the first time-travel experiment ever. 

[Apr 2012]

Fraggle Rock
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 23 Feb 1987

The symbolic and colorful world of Jim Henson’s fraggle muppets included at least one moment of time travel when Mokey, Boober and Wembly are mysteriously transported back to a time of fraggles who cannot laugh.

 Wouldnt it be fun to travel in time? O’ course, you wouldnt really go anywhere. No, Sprocket, because the past and the future are happening now, here in the present. Its all a question of perception. I thought dogs knew things like that. 

[Jan 2014]
The story also appeared in this 1990 collection.
“The Silver Box”
by Louise Lawrence
First publication: A Quiver of Ghosts, Mar 1987
While searching for a ghost in the past, Mark and Zak stumble upon young Carole, shut up in her bedroom with glandular fever in 1987.

 What else do we live for but the little mundane things of life? If we sit around waiting for the few, rare wonderful moments that make it all worthwhile we may as well not live at all. 

[Jan 2014]

Timestalkers
by Ray Brown and Brian Clemens (Schultz, director)
First aired: 10 Mar 1987

After the death of his wife and child, Dr. Scott McKenzie stumbles upon a tintype photograph from the old west with three corpses, a shooter and a modern Magnum 357, leading him to develop a theory of time travel that is soon confirmed when a beautiful woman of the future appears to take him back to the old west in order to chase the shooter, save President Cleveland, and pursue other obvious plot developments.

 Georgia: Very impressive, professor. Its a small wonder you were considered one of the worlds foremost authorities.
The Professor: [incredulously] Were? 

[Dec 2012]

Amazing Stories
created by Steven Spielberg
First time travel: 20 Mar 1987



Steven Spielberg brought Amazing Stories to tv in two seasons of an anthology format. At least one time-travel story—Jack Finney’s venerable “Such Interesting Neighbors”—appeared in the second season (20 Mar 1987).

Janet and I bought our first color tv for these episodes, a Sony of course.

 Oh, Randy, neighbors are always strange; those are the rules. 

[Mar 1987]

To Sail Beyond the Sunset
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Jul 1987



In the 19th century, Maureen Johnson grows up near Kansas City, eventually marrying and raising her own brood, including Lazarus Long (the original) and Lazarus Long (from the future).

 I found myself offering my hand and greeting a young man who matched in every way (even to his body odor, which I caught quite clearly—clean male, in fresh rut)—a man who was my father as my earliest memory recalled him. 

[Dec 1987]

“Trapalanda”
by Charles Sheffield
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Jul 1987

As a service to all you time travelers in wwwland, I’m including this story in my adventures page, but only to give fair warning of the third darned story in The Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century with nary a lick of time travel. What was that crazy pair of editors (Turtledove and Greenberg) thinking? Still, it’s an enjoyable Lovecraftian tale with well-drawn characters meeting time anomolies as they search for a lost city in Patagonia.

 No one who spends more than a week in central Patagonia can be ignorant of Trapalanda. For three hundred years, explorers have searched for the “City of the Caesars,” Trapalanda, the Patagonian version of El Dorado. 

[Jul 2011]

Calvin and Hobbes
by Bill Watterson
First time travel: 31 Aug 1987


 Relax! We’ll be back as soon as we go.          

“Lui-même en Anachron”
aka “Himself in Anachron”
by Cordwainer Smith
First publication: Les puissances de’espace, Sep 1987
Tasco Magnon, time traveler, decides to take his new bride on his next trip through time—a quest to find the mythical Knot in Time, where the two of them get trapped and only one can return.

After Smith’s death in 1966, the story was completed by his wife and sold to Harlan Ellison’s anthology The Last Dangerous Vision. In 1987, a translated version of the story was published in a French collection of Smith’s stories, and the English version was included in Smith’s 1993 complete short science fiction collection published by NESFA. By then, Ellison’s rights to the story had expired, although that didn’t stop him from suing NESFA.

 ‘Honeymoon in time,’ indeed. Why? Is it that your woman is jealous of your time trips? 

[Apr 2014]

Replay
by Ken Grimwood
First publication: Sep 1987
After 43-year-old radio newsman Jeff Winston dies, he finds himself back in his 18-year-old body in 1963—an occurrence that keeps happening each time he dies again in 1988; eventually, in one of his lives, he finds Pamela, another replayer, and they work at figuring out the meaning of it all (without success).

 So he hadnt died. Somehow, the realization didnt thrill him, just as his earlier assumption of death had failed to strike him with dread. 

[Jun 2011]

The Jukebox Stories
by Dean Wesley Smith
First story: Night Cry, Fall 12987

A jukebox in the Garden Lounge does more than make you remember the time of the song. It actually takes you to that time.

I’ve yet to find a good guide to these stories and where they can be obtained. The first story, “The Jukebox Man’ appeared in 1987 in a sister magazine to The Twilight Zone Magazine. Here’s a list of the other stories that I know of, although the only one I’ve read so far is “Jukebox Gifts’:

 The Jukebox Man (Fall 1987)Night Cry
A Bubble for a Minute (Jan 1994)By Any Other Fame
Jukebox Gifts (Jan 1994)F&SF
Black Betsy (Oct 1994)Alternate Outlaws
The Ghost of the Garden Lounge (Nov 2005)Time After Time
He Could Have Coped with Dragons (Nov 2009)chapbook
A Golden Dream (Jul 2010)chapbook
The Songs of Memory (Jul 2012)chapbook
Our Slaying Song Tonight (Oct 2012)chapbook
The Wages of the Moment (Jan 2013)chapbook
She Arrived without a Song (May 2013)chapbook

 I had carefully typed onto labels the names of over sixty Christmas songs, then taped them next to the red buttons. Somewhere in this jukebox, I hoped there would be a special song for each man. A song that would trigger a memory and a ride into the past. My Christmas present to each of them. 
—“Jukebox Gifts”

[Jun 2015]

The Time Guardian
by John Baxter and Brian Hannant (Hannant, director)
First release: 3 Dec 1987

When terminatoresque cyborgs attack a future Australian city (headed by Quantum Leap’s favorite scoundrel, Dean Stockwell, and defended by everyone’s favorite princess, Carrie Fisher), the scientists taken them all back in time—a fine plan until the evil cyborgs follow.

 One city attempted to escape their onslaught by unravelling the secrets of time and travelling back in a desperate search for a safer age....they succeeded and time was their friend until the arrival yet again of their relentless enemy. 

[Apr 2013]

The Devil’s Arithmetic
by Jane Yolen
First publication: 1988

In fifth grade, Hannah read this intense novel of a young modern Jewish girl thrown back to the concentration camps of World War II Germany.

 Hannah was stunned. It was as if shed suddenly been transported to a movie set. 

[May 1989]



One Life to Live
created by Agnes Nixon
First time travel: 1988


In a 1988 plot line (“Buchanan City”), Clint ends up back in 1888 where he falls in love and is betrothed to Viki’s look-alike ancestor Ginny!

Apart from Dark Shadows (which, as we all know, was more than a soap opera), this is the first time travel that I’ve spotted in a soap.

 Ginny: I was staring up at the night sky trying to find that extra planet that you claimed was there when I was giving the children their astronomy lesson today.
Clint: Why cant you just take my word for it?
Ginny: Because brilliant scientists have studied the heavens and deduced that there are only a certain number of planets in our solar system—eight, just eight. And then you come along and throw the whole system out of question! 

[Jun 2015]

Lightning
by Dean Koontz
First publication: 1988

Right from her birth, Laura Shane has had a quick wit, a fateful loss of those close to her, and a time-traveling guardian angel who is himself chased by his evil compatriots.

 One of the things he had learned from the experiments in the institute was that reshaping fate was not always easy. Destiny struggled to reassert the pattern that was meant to be. Perhaps being molested and psychologically destroyed was such an immutable part of Lauras fate that Stefan could not prevent it from happening sooner or later. 

[Aug 2012]

“The Turning Point”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Drabble Project, 1 Apr 1988

In exactly 100 words, Madison goes back in time to meet himself at the turning point of his young life.

Thanks to Marc Richardson for sending this one to me.

 He was a clerk. 

[Mar 2012]

“Fire, Fire”
by Allison Prince
First publication: A Haunting Refrain, May 1988
When young Emma falls behind her parents on a country outing, she finds herself at a Neolithic funeral pyre.

 Emma, we cant keep waiting for you all the time. We"re nearly at the top—see you up there, all right? Its not far. 

[Jan 2014]

Star Trek: The Next Generation
created by Gene Roddenberry
First time travel: 2 May 1988

I watched the premier with Harry and Cathy just four weeks before Hannah was born. In the seven seasons, there were 12 time-travel episodes.

 We’ll Always Have Paris (2 May 1988)repeated seconds
Time Squared (3 Apr 1989)back six hours
Yesterday’s Enterprise (19 Feb 1990)Enterprise C from 2344 to 2366
Captain’s Holiday (2 Apr 1990)Vorgans from 27th century
A Matter of Time (18 Nov 1991)historian from 26th century
Cause and Effect (23 Mar 1992)time loop
Time’s Arrow I/II (15 Jun / 21 Sep 1992)   to 1890s San Francisco
Tapestry (15 Feb 1993)Picard’s earlier life
Firstborn (25 Apr 1994)Worf’s son from 40 years ahead
All Good Things I/II (23 May 1994)jumping between three times

 Make it so. 

[Sep 1987]

“Ripples in the Dirac Sea”
by Geoffrey A. Landis
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1988

A physics guy invents a time machine that can go only backward and must always return the traveler to the exact same present from which he left.

 

  1. Travel is possible only into the past.
  2. The object transported will return to exactly the time and place of departure.
  3. It is not possible to bring objects from the past to the present.
  4. Actions in the past cannot change the present.
 
[Nov 1988]

“On the Watchtower at Plataea”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Other Edens II, Nov 1988
Miriam and her fellow time travelers, John and Stan, set up camp in an abandoned watchtower to observe and record the siege of the walled city-state Plataea in the Peloponnesian War.

 It was a shock to find that the expedition could go no further back than 429 BC; though for some of us, it was not an unwelcome one. Miriam was perhaps the only one amongst us who was annoyed that we couldn't get to Pericles. He had died earlier, in the part of the year we couldnt reach. So near—but we had hit a barrier, as solid as a rockface on the path of linear time, in the year that the Peloponnesian War was gaining momentum. 

[Apr 2014]

“The Instability”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The London Observer, 1 Jan 1989

Professor Firebrenner explains to Atkins how they can go forward in time to study a red dwarf and then return back to Earth.

 Of course, but how far can the Sun and Earth move in the few hours it will take us to observe the star? 

[Dec 1999]

Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure
by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon (Stephen Herek, director)
First release: 17 Feb 1989

The Two Great Ones, Bill S. Preston, Esq., and Ted “Theodore” Logan, are the subjects of time-traveler Rufus’s mission, but instead they end up using his machine to write a history report to save their band Wyld Stallyns.

 Most excellent! 

[Jul 2010]

Quantum Leap
created by Donald Bellisario
First episode: 26 Mar 1989

Physicist and all-around good guy Sam Beckett rushes his time machine into production—funding is about to be cut!—and as a consequence, he shifts from one life to another, always with a moral mission and his holographic cohort Al.

 Oh boy! 

[Mar 1989]

“The Price of Oranges”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1989

Harry’s closet takes him back to 1937 where his social security income buys cheaper oranges, treats for his friend Manny, and possibly a companionable man for his jaded granddaughter Jackie.

 Harry bought a pair of socks, thick gray wool, for 89 cents. When the man took his dollar, Harry held his breath: each first time made a little pip in his stomach. But on one ever looked at the dates of old bills. He bought two oranges for five cents each, and then, thinking of Manny, bought a third. At a candystore he bought G-8 and His Battle Aces for fifteen cents. At The Collectors Cozy in the other time they would gladly give him thirty dollars for it. Finally, he bought a cherry Coke for a nickel and headed towards the park. 

[May 1989]



Field of Dreams
by Phil Aldin Robinson
First release: 23 Apr 1989

Corn farmer Ray Kinsella is called to build a ballpark in his cornfield (with part of his calling resulting from a trip to 1972); once the field is built, various ballplayers from the past come.

 If you build it, they will come. 

[Dec 1992]

“Great Work of Time”
by John Crowley
First publication: Novelty: Four Stories, May 1989

When a secret society called the Otherhood acquires Caspar Last’s time machine in 1983, they set out to change history so that the British Empire never declines (although it may be infused with various Lovecraftian species such as the Draconics), an endeavor for which in 1956 they recruit Denys Winterset, one of the Colonial Service’s many assistant district commissioners of police.

 Of course the possible worlds we make dont compare to the real one we inhabit—not nearly so well furnished, or tricked out with details. And yet still somehow better. More satisfying. Perhaps the novelist is only a special case of a universal desire to reshape, to ‘take this sorry scheme of things entire,’ smash it into bits, and ‘remold it nearer to the hearts desire’—as old Kyayyám says. The egoist is continually doing it with his own life. To dream of doing it with history is no more useful a game, I suppose, but as a game, it shows more sport. 

[Feb 2015]

“A Sleep and a Forgetting”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Playboy, Jul 1989

Mike is pulled out of his quiet tenured life as a professor in the Department of Sinological Studies at the University of Washington because his lifelong friend Joe Hedley seems to be receiving transmissions in Mongolian. When Mike arrives, he not only understands the transmission, but can talk back as well.

Time travel and alternate histories often overlap, usually when some incident of time travel to the past creates the alternate timeline. This story’s an intriguing alternative where a supposedly alternate past history is discovered through the two-way transmission, but it’s origin remains a mystery.

 Weirder and weirder, I thought. A Christian Mongol? Living in Byzantium? Talking to me on the space telephone out of the twelfth century? 

[Jul 2015]

Mixed Doubles
by Daniel da Cruz
First publication: Aug 1989
Justin Pope, a music major (like Paul Eisebrey!), stumbles upon a time machine that he uses to kidnap Franz Schubert from his deathbed; Pope cures Franz and uses him as a source of compositions to create a magnificent career of his own (with the help of Angelica), until Franz turns the tables (with the help of Philipa).

Paul Eisenbrey introduced me to this author in college, but I found Mixed Doubles on my own some years later.

 From time to time double checking with the manual, he began to punch in the commands that, he had calculated from ceaseless experimentation, would project him three thousand years into the past, plus of minus fifteen years. It was a vast improvement on his first efforts, which had been accurate only to within two centuries. The reentry program was more precise by orders of magnitude: it would bring him back to the moment of departure, plus zero to seventeen hours. 

[May 1990]

Ray Bradbury Theater
created by Ray Bradbury
First time travel: 11 Aug 1989



Ray Bradbury Theater ran for two seasons on HBO starting 21 May 1985. It then shifted to the USA Network for four seasons which had three time-travel adaptations.

 A Sound of Thunder (11 Aug 1989)dinosaur hunt
Touch of Petulance (12 Oct 1990)newspaper from the future
The Toynbee Convector (26 Oct 1990)   100 years into the future

 Dinosaurs large and small fill my junkyard workroom.
This one given to me by a friend 30 years ago. These given as toys to my daughters, and when they didnt play with them I simply took them back. So with dinosaurs coming into my life, I often wondered what would happen if I could go back into theirs. Dinosaurs, time machines, put them together and you have a
tale one billion years old.
 
—Bradbury’s introduction to “A Sound of Thunder”

[Mar 2012]

Millennium
by John Varley (Michael Anderson, director)
First release: 25 Aug 1989

Cheryl Ladd plays Louise Baltimore opposite Kris Kristopherson’s Bill Smith.

 For one thing, paradoxes can occur. Say you build a time machine, go backwards in time and murder your father when he was ten years old. That means you were never born. And if you were never born, how did you build the time machine? Paradox! It's the possibility of wiping out your own existence that makes most people rule out time-travel. Still, why not? If you were careful, you could do it. 

[Aug 2011]

The Smurfs
created by Peyo (aka Pierre Culliford)
First time travel: 9 Sep 1989


While trying to return a dinosaur to its proper time at the start of Season 9, a time whirlwind whips the annoying little mushroom blueters into time—a condition that’s carried on through the rest of the season.

 Well, Papa Smurf, there is one way to get this critter back home, but its awfully dangerous. 

[Jul 2013]

Ring Raiders
by Phil Harnage
First episode: 16 Sep 1989


Matchbox produced and aired five cartoon episodes in 1989 to promote their Ring Raider line of toys including the time-traveling planes of the evil Skull Squadron and the right-stuff Ring Raider pilots.

 Lieutenant, Ive got three strange bogeys about a mile north-northwest. Theyre like nothing Ive ever seen before. They dont even have props. 

[Aug 2013]

Back to the Future II
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 3 Jul 1989

Doc Brown takes Marty and Jennifer from 1985 to 2015 to save their children from a bad fate, but the consequences pile up when Biff also gets in on the time-travel action.

 The time-traveling is just too dangerous. Better that I devote myself to study the other great mystery of the universe—women! 

[Jul 1989]

12:01 P.M.
by Richard Lupoff, Stephen Tolkin, Jonathan Heap (Heap, director)
First release: 1990 (27 minute short film)


Kurtwood Smith brings Myron Castleman’s 59 minutes to life.

 You see, it’s like...it’s like we’re stuck. You know, like a...like a needle on a scratched record. It all starts at 12:01, and everything goes along fine until one o’clock and then Bam! the whole world snaps back to 12:01 again. 

[Dec 2011]

Eternity Comics’ The Time Machine
adapted by Bill Spangler and John Ross
First publication: Apr 1990

This three-issue black-and-white adaptation has some creative twists such as when it occurs to the time traveller how to use the machine to destroy the Morlocks.

 I was elated! I gripped the starting lever with both hands and went off with a thud. 

[Jan 2012]

Back to the Future III
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 25 May 1990

Marty and 1955 Doc travel back to the old west where the older Doc is trapped along with various Biff ancestors and a possible love interest for Doc.

 It means your future hasn’t been written yet. No one’s has. Your future is whatever you make it. 

[May 1990]

Alvin and the Chipmonks
by Dianne Dixon
First time travel: 8 Sep 1990


It was not until the final season of the Alvin revival (nearly two decades after creator Bagdasarian’s death) that the Theodore, Simon and Alvin had a series of movie take-offs including Dianne Dixon’s episode, “Back to Our Future,” in which the quirky inventor Clyde Crashcup (filling in for Doc Brown) brings the 90s trio back to the 50s to stop the original trip from giving up their singing careers.

 Now remember boys, you must convince the old Alvin to stick with his musical career, so you can all be stars in the future! 

[Sep 2012]

Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure (Animated)
produced by David Kirschner, Paul Sabella, and Andy Heyward
First episode: 15 Sep 1990


...featuring the most outstanding voices of the original Two Great Ones, but bogus plots and dialog.

 ♫ Whenever time stands still and trouble moves too fast, to save the future, we must learn about the past. ♫ 

[Jul 2010]

The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3
created by Reed Shelly and Bruce Shelly
First time travel: 29 Sep 1990

The animation and sound effects are a good reflection of the video game. In one episode (“Toddler Terrors of Time Travel”), the son of King Bowser invents a time machine to go back in time and stop Mario, Luigi and Toad from ever coming to their kingdom. The heroes stow away, and everyone ends up as toddlers in Brooklyn.

 Maybe we can go back and change history, King Dad. All we need is a little time travel. 

[Sep 2012]

The Spirit of '76
by Roman Coppola and Lucas Reiner
First release: 12 Oct 1990

In the year 2176, three time travelers aiming for 1776 end up in the time of David Cassidy and disco instead.

 Channel Six, our foremost epistomological anthrosociologist has redlined and outlined you for a mission back in time. 

[Nov 2014]

“The Time Traveler”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Nov 1990


The little demon Azazel (the hero of many an Asimov tale) sends a world-renowned writer travels back in time to see his first writing teacher at a 1934 school that is remarkably like Asimov’s own Boys High in Brooklyn.

 “Because,” and here he struck his chest a resounding thump, “the burning memories of youthful snubs and spurnings remain unavenged and, indeed, forever unavengable.” 

[Dec 1990]

“Ben Franklin’s Laser”
by Doug Beason
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1990
It appears that the sun will go nova in 75 hours, which leaves Grayson to go back in time to give a boost to science in Ben Franklin’s time.

 It sounded nice and simple: allow Ben Franklin to invent the laser and let the technology casade. Grow enough so that in five hundred years wed have something to get us out of this mess. 

[Aug 2012]

“3 RMS Good View”
by Karen Haber
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, mid-Dec 1990
When a lawyer from the future decides to rent an apartment in 1968 San Francisco, she must first sign your standard temporal noninterference contract—yeah, like that one ever holds up in court!

 Dont change the past or the past will change you. The time laws. You lawyers understand this kind of thing. You, and you alone, are responsible for any dislocation of past events, persons or things, et cetera et cetera. Read the small print and sign. 

[Dec 1990]

“The Romanian Question”
by Michael Moorcock
First publication: Back Brain Recluse 18, Spring 1991


Jerry appears to be a time traveler (or maybe God) involved with Hitler and the democratic movement in Romania, but really did’t get it. But the bicycle he rides as a time machine shares a description with the time machine in “Behold the Man.”

 The time machine was a sphere of milky fluid attached to the front lamp-holder of a Raleigh “Royal Albert” Police Bicycle of the old, sturdy type, before all the corruption had been made public. 

[Feb 2014]

“Crossroads”
aka “Cross Roads Blues”
by Paul McAuley
First publication: Interzone, Apr 1991

In an alternate 1960s America where the U.S. is isolationist and Adam Clayton Powell is president, Time traveler (or “Loop rider”) Ike Turner has a fascination with blues player Bobby Johnson, so he sticks around a bit longer than he should in 1937 to meet the musician. It shouldn’t be a big deal; after all, according to Einstein, not even the Loop riders can change the past.

 Anyway, he went away maybe a year, and I dont know if he went to the crossroads with ol Legba or not, but Son House told me when he came back he was carryin a gitar, and asked for a spot like old times. Well, Son was about ready to take a break, and told Bobby Johnson to go ahead and got himself outside before the boy began. But that time it was all changed. That time, he tol me, the music he heard Bobby Johnson make put the hair on his head to standin. 

[Apr 2014]

“Robot Visions”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1991


A team of Temporalists send robot RG-32 200 years into the future where it seems to almost all that mankind is doing better than expected on Earth and in space.

 RG-32 was a rather old-fashioned robot, eminently replaceable. He could observe and report, perhaps without quite the ingenuity and penetration of a human being—but well enough. He would be without fear, intent only on following orders, and he could be expected to tell the truth. 

[May 1991]

Outlander Series
by Diana Gabaldon
First book: 1 Jun 1991


I admit that I had one of my reading minions (Janet) assay this series for me. She reported that there are uncountably many books about Housewives in Time with ripped bodices.

 I turned to find an interested audience, no doubt attracted by the racket, standing in the hall. Brother Roger and Murtagh stood side by side, staring at my flushed face and heaving bosom. 


T2: Judgement Day
by James Cameron and William Wisher, Jr. (Cameron, director)
First release: 1 Jul 1991

Once more, the machines from 2029 send back a killer cyborg, this time a T-1000 to kill John Connor himself in 1995, but Connor of the future counters by sending one of the original Model 101s to save himself.

 Come with me if you want to live. 
—The T-800 to Sarah at the Pescadero State Hospital

[Jul 1991]

Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey
by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon (Stephen Herek, director)
First release: 19 Jul 1991

Two Evil Robots come from the future to kill Bill and Ted and destroy their babes, and after that happens, the Two Great Ones begin a journey that starts with Death and ends with Two Little Ones.

 Look, after we get away from this guy, we use the booth. We time travel back to before the concert and set up the things we need to get him now. 

[Jul 2010]

Quantum Leap Comic Books
edited by George Broderick, Jr.
First publication: Sep 1991


Little known fact: The Quantum Leap comic books were actually written and drawn two decades before the birth of their creators, which is the only reason they have been given a special temporal dispensation overriding the law that forbids post-1969 comic books in this list. In the first issue, Sam desperately wants to save Martin Luther King Jr., but he realizes that’s not the reason he’s in Memphis.

 He awoke to find himself in the past, suffering from partial amnesia and facing a mirror image that was not his own. 

[Dec 2010]

Back to the Future (Animated)
created by Bob Gale
First episode: 7 Sep 1991

After III, Doc Brown and Clara settle and raise a family in Hill Valley, though “settle” might be the wrong word when you once again have a working DeLorean.

 You do sorta look like that J. Michael Fox guy. 

[Sep 1991]

“Bad Timing”
by Molly Brown
First publication: Interzone, Dec 1991

When Alan’s coworker tells him that an old women’s magazine has a romance story called “The Love That Conquered Time” with Alan himself as the hero, he is dubious, but he reads the thing nonetheless.

 Youre the only reason, Claudia. I did it for you. I read a story that you wrote and I knew it was about me and that it was about you. I searched in the Archives and I found your picture and then I knew that I loved you and that I had always loved you and that I always would. 

[Apr 2014]

Murder Most Horrid
starring by Dawn French
First time travel: 5 Dec 1991


In this anthology series, Dawn French finds herself in one murder story after another, including one tale of a “Determined Woman” physicist who uses her time machine in an attempt to change the happenings of one particular murder.

 If you dont get out of this house, Im going to murder you! 

[May 2015]

Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventures (Live)
created by Darren Starr
First episode: 28 Jun 1992

The Two Great Ones become the two lame ones, although the Elvis episode has some redeeming factors.

 Its a completely creepy feeling to fail before a large group of Elvises. 

[Dec 2010]

“Two Guys from the Future”
by Terry Bisson
First publication: Omni, Aug 1992

Two guys from the future show up in an art gallery (to “salvage the works of art of your posteriors” because “no shit is fixing to hang loose any someday now.”) where they meet a security-guard-cum-artist and her boss, Mimsy.

 “We are two guys from the future.”
“Yeah, right. Now get the hell out of here!”
“Dont shoot! Is that a gun?”
That gave me pause; it was a flashlight.
 

[Jan 2015]

The Ugly Little Boy
aka Child of Time
novelization by Isaac Asimov and Robert Silverberg
First publication: Sep 1992


The story of Ms. Fellowes and Timmie is augmented by the story of what his tribe did during his time away.

 He was a very ugly little boy and Edith Fellowes loved him more dearly than anything in the world. 

[Nov 1992]

Darkwing Duck
created by Tad Stones
First time travel: 18 Sep 1992

The crimefighting duck (or his pals) time traveled at least five times, some of which used arch-nemesis Quackerjack’s Time Top (no word on whether it was stolen from Brick Bradford).

 Paraducks (18 Sep 1991)to earlier in DW’s life
Quack of Ages (18 Nov 1991)back to 1921
Time and Punishment (19 Nov 1991)    Gosalyn to the future
Inherit the Wimp (19 Sep 1992)DW’s ancestors to the present
Extinct Possibility (5 Dec 1992)to the time of the dinosaurs

 Need I remind you about the time with the floor wax, the peanut butter and my VCR? 

[Sep 1991]

The Guns of the South
by Harry Turtledove
First publication: Oct 1992

A faction from the early 21st century brings boatloads of AK-47 machine guns back to General Lee in the War between the States.

 My friends and I—everyone who belongs to America Will Break—come from a hundred and fifty years in your future. 

[Feb 2014]

Captain Planet and the Planeteers
aka The New Adventures of Captain Planet
created by Ted Turner and Barbara Pyle
First time travel: 31 Oct 1992


Gaia, the spirit of the Earth, sends out five magic rings which are obtained by teenagers who are then tasked with protecting the planet Earth, sometimes individually and sometimes by combining to call forth Captain Planet who (among other things) can even take them into the past (“OK at the Gunfight Corral”).

 There she is, boys: my own time machine. 

[Aug 2013]

Quantum Leap Novels
First book: Nov 1992


 The Novel (aka Carny Knowledge) (Nov 1992)   Ashley McConnell
Too Close for Comfort (Apr 1993)Ashley McConnell
The Wall (Jan 1994)Ashley McConnell
The Beginning (Jan 1994, UK)Julie Robitaille
The Ghost and the Gumshoe (Jan 1994, UK)Julie Robitaille
Prelude (Jun 1994)Ashley McConnell
Knights of Morningstar (Sep 1994)Melanie Rawn
Search and Rescue (Dec 1994)Melissa Crandall
Random Measures (Mar 1995)Ashley McConnell
Pulitzer (Jun 1995)L. Elizabeth Storm
Double or Nothing (Dec 1995)C.J. Henderson
Odyssey (Mar 1996)Barbara E. Walton
Independence (Aug 1996)John Peel
Angels Unaware (Jan 1997)L. Elizabeth Storm
Obsessions (Mar 1997)Carol Davis
Loch Ness Leap (Jul 1997)Sandy Schofield
Heat Wave (Nov 1997)Melanie Kent
Foreknowledge (Mar 1998)Christo Defillipis
Song and Dance (Oct 1998)Mindy Peterman
Mirror’s Edge (Feb 2000)Ester D. Reese

 “Oh, boy,” he whispered. 

[Sep 2013]

“The Battle of Long Island”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Omni, Feb/Mar 1993

Major Susan Peters is in charge of all the nurses at “The Hole” where a series of soldiers from alternative past Revolutionary Wars keep appearing.

 Theyre often like this. They find themsleves in an alien, impossible, unimaginable place, surround by guards with uniforms and weapons they dont recognize, and yet their first concern is not their personal fate but the battle they left behind. 

[May 1993]

Bradbury Comics’ “A Sound of Thunder”
adapted by Richard Corben
First publication: Ray Bradbury Comics 1, Feb 1993


In addition to reprinting Williamson’s 1954 adaptation, Ray Bradbury Comics 1 had a new 12-page adaptation by Richard Corben.

 My god! It could reach up and grab the moon. 

[Jun 2011]

Groundhog Day
by Danny Rubin and Harold Ramis (Ramis, director)
First release: 12 Feb 1993

A jaded weatherman, Phil Connors (no relation to John Connor), is in Punxsutawney to cover the Groundhog Day goings-on, continually repeating the day and—after losing his jaded edge—striving for Rita’s heart.

 Youre not a god. You can take my word for it: This is twelve years of Catholic school talking. 

[Feb 1993]

Army of Darkness
by Sam Raimi and Ivan Raimi (Sam Raimi, director)
First release: 19 Feb 1993

A Connecticut Yankee (or maybe Michigan) in King Arthur's Court meets the Living Dead and their kin.

 This is my boom-stick. Its a 12-guage, double barreled Remington—S-marts top-of-the-line. Youll find them in the Sporting Goods Department. 

[Apr 2012]

X-Men Cartoon
created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby
First time travel: 13 Mar 1993


Even though the 1992 cartoon had all them new-fangled X-Men and their funky costumes, I still got some enjoyment from the Kirby-designed villians, such as the Sentinels in the two-part time-travel story, “Days of Future Past” (which, not coincidentally, will also be the name of the upcoming X-Men movie). Well, they were sort of Kirby-designed: He penciled the cover and sketched the layouts of X-Men 14.

 We rebels have a theory: If the assasination of the 90s never occurred... 

[Mar 1993]

Glimpses
by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Jul 1993


A weak marriage isn’t enough to sustain Ray Shackleford, but he doesn’t want to leave either, so he spends time in his mind wondering what various unmade albums would be like from the Beatles and other 60s bands (the Doors, the Beach Boys), and one day the music of those unmade albums starts coming from the speakers in his stereo repair shop.

 When I opened my eyes it was nighttime and I was crouched on the sidewalk in front of Brians house and it wasn't 1989 anymore. 

[Aug 2013]

12:01
by Richard Lupoff, Jonathan Heap, Richard Morton (Jack Sholder, director)
First release: 5 Jul 1993

Trapped in a one-day time loop, Barry Thomas tries to bring down the company that’s causing the loop, hopefully coming to a happy ending with the gorgeous scientist who runs the project.

 Barry: Oh my God. It’s twelve o’clock.
Lisa: No! We’ve got to do something!
Barry: There’s no time. Quick, tell me what your favorite color is. 

[Jan 2011]

Time Machines: Time Travel in Physics, Metaphysics and Science Fiction
by Paul J. Nahin
First publication: Sep 1993
If you have only one reference book on your shelf—on any topic—this must be it. Get the second edition.

 This is, I believe, a book for the adventurous in spirit. 

[Dec 2008]

King Arthur and the Knights of Justice
created by Jean Chalopin
First episode: 13 Sep 1993


When the real King Arthur and his knights are put out of commission by the evil Morgana, Merlin brings a football player, Arthur King, and his teammates, the Knights, back as replacements for two seasons on this syndicated series.

 And then, from the field of the future, a new king will come to save the world of the past. 

[Jul 2013]

“The Girl with Some Kind of Past. And George.”
by William Tenn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1993
A pretty, young time traveler from the future visits the most fascinating person she can think of in the past—that would be playboy George Rice, coincidentally her great-great-grandfather—but she won’t tell George what makes him so fascinating.

 That left the incest angle, and I asked him about that. He says that making it with your great-great-granddaughter from the twenty-first century is not much different from making it with your clothes-designer neighbor from across the hall. 

[Apr 2012]

Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog
created by Reed Shelly, Bruce Shelly, Phil Harnage and Kent Butterworth
First time travel: 26 Oct 1993

Video game character Sonic and his sidekick Tails repeatedly foil the evil Dr. Robotnik, including a four-part quest to the past where Robotnik seeks the four all-powerful chaos emeralds in the times of Blackbeard, King Arfur, Sonic’s ancestors and prehistory.

 Blackbot the Pirate (26 Oct 1993)to time of Blackbeard
Hedgehog of the Hound Table (27 Oct 1993)   to time of King Arfur
Robotnik’s Pyramid Scheme (28 Oct 1993)erasing Sonic’s family tree
Prehistoric Sonic (29 Oct 1993)to caveman times and elsewhere

 I cant go through with this. My theories of time and space were developed for peace, not for your evil schemes. 

[Sep 2012]

The Silurian Tales
by Steven Utley
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1993

I’ve read ten of Utley’s stories of an expedition plopped into the Silurian geologic period, the most recent of which, “The End in Eden,” tells the tale of customs agents Phil Morrow and Sal Shelton, living at the border between the Silurian period and the present, matching wits with NCIS and JAG officers over a case of possible smuggling of Paleolithic biological specimens.

 There and Then (Nov 1993)Asimovs
The Age of Mud and Slime (Mar 1996)Asimovs
A Silurian Tale (May 1996)Asimovs
The Wind Over the World (Oct/Nov 1996)Asimovs
The Real World (30 Aug 2000)Sci Fiction
Chain of Life (Oct/Nov 2000)Asimovs
The Despoblado (22 Nov 2000)Sci Fiction
Cloud by Van Gogh (Dec 2000)F&SF
Half a Loaf (Jan 2001)Asimovs
Five Miles from Pavement (21 Mar 2001)Sci Fiction
The World Without (Jul 2001)Asimovs
Walking in Circles (Jan 2002)Asimovs
Treading the Maze (Feb 2002)Asimovs
Foodstuff (Feb 2002)F&SF
Beyond the Sea (29 Aug 2002)Revolution SF
Exile (Aug 2003)Asimovs
Chaos and Gods (18 Aug 2003)Revolution SF
Invisible Kingdoms (Feb 2004)F&SF
Babel (Mar 2004)Analog
Another Continuum Heard From! (2 Apr 2004)  Revolution SF
A Paleozoic Palimpsest (Oct 2004)F&SF
The Wave-Function Collapse (Mar 2005)Asimovs
Promised Land (Jul 2005)F&SF
Silv’ry Moon (Oct/Nov 2005)F&SF
Diluvium (May 2006)F&SF
All of Creation (18 Jan 2008)Cosmos
The World Within the World (Mar 2008)Asimovs
The 400-Million-Year Itch (Apr 2008)F&SF
Variant (Summer 2008)Postscripts
The Woman Under the World (Jul 2008)Asimovs
Slug Hell (Sep 2008)Asimovs
Lost Places of Earth (Jan 2009)in We Think, Therefore We Are
The Tortoise Grows Elate (Mar/Apr 2012)F&SF
The End in Eden (Oct 2012)Analog
The Gift Horse (Fall 2012)in The 400-Million-Year Itch
Sidestep (Spring 2013)in Invisible Kingdoms

 Wheres he going to run to? Home is four hundred million miles away. 
—The End in Eden

[Dec 2013]

Philadelphia Experiment II
by Wallace C. Bennett, et. al., (Stephen Cornwell, director)
First release: 12 Nov 1993

At the end of the first movie, David Herdeg was left in 1983 America; ten years later, another experiment sends a nuclear bombed to 1943 Germany and David must go back to stop from creating a Nazi-ruled world.

 That plane got sucked back there. Landed in the heart of Nazi Germany. 

[Mar 2012]

Goodnight Sweetheart
created by Laurence Marks and Maurice Gran
First episode: 18 Nov 1993

Television repairman Gary Sparrow walks into a pub and meets a friendly barmaid in London during World War II, a spot where he repeatedly returns to escape a mundane life and loving but sometimes trying wife in 1993.

 Oh, I must say you might be takin’ this 1940s theme a bit too far. 

[Jul 2013]

We’re Back! A Dinosaur’s Story
adaptation by John Patrick Shanley
First release: 24 Nov 1993


Based on the children’s book of the same name, Rex tells the story of how he went from the Cretaceous to the modern-day golf course. The story is weak, but the animation and voices are better than the usual 90s fare.

 Greetings friends, and welcome to my shack. My name is Captain Neweyes, and I live in the far future where all the stars and all the planets have had to learn to get along. 

[Aug 2013]

Dilbert
by Scott Adams
First time travel: 19 Dec 1993


 Make sure nothing changes because of my visit or it will kill everyone in the future. 


“Another Story or
a Fisherman of the Inland Sea”

by Ursula K. Le Guin
First publication: A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994)

At 18, Hideo leaves his family and his planet, O, to become part of a group that invents instantaneous tranportation—a device that ends up taking him back to the time that he first left Planet O

 So: once upon a time when I was twenty-one years old I left my home and came on the NAFAL ship Terraces of Darranda to study at the Ekumenical Schools on Hain. 

[Jul 2011]

“The Tourist”
by Paul Park
First publication: Interzone, Feb 1994

Once the time-travel tourist business gets going, there’s no stopping it, not to mention all those travelers who feel they have business with Hitler or Stalin—which brings about an interesting theory of time not being a continuum at all, all told through the personal lens of one recently divorced man who buys a ticket for Paleolithic Spain and sets out after his ex-wife.

 We just cant keep our hands off, and as a result, Cuba has invaded prehistoric Texas, the Empire of Ashok has become a Chinese client state, and Napoleon is in some kind of indirect communication with Genghis Khan. 

[Apr 2014]

Time Chasers
by David Giancola (Giancola, director)
First release: 17 Mar 1994

Before watching this movie (about amateur inventor Nick Miller’s time machine in a two-prop plane and the evil corporation that tries to take it over), I never realized that the word “unwatchable” had degrees. Of course, the movie itself is unwatchable, but in a genuinely inoffensive, cultish way; the self-absorbed add-on commentary from the Mystery Science Theater 3000 hosts who presented it in 1997 on early-morning tv is categorically unwatchable.

 You brought us up here this morning to look at your—time machine?! 

[May 2013]



The Magic School Bus
by Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen
First time travel: 8 Sep 1994


In The Magic School Bus in the Time of the Dinosaurs, Miss Frizzle and her charges turn the bus into a time machine that takes them to the Triassic, the Jurassic, and the Cretaceous. The bus had several other adventures in time, too, although not all by Cole and Degen.

 Dinosaur Detectives (2002)Chapter Book 9
At the First Thanksgivingby Joanna Cole
Builds the Statue of Libertyby Anne Capeci
Flies with Dinosaursby Martin Schwabacher
Ancient Egypt (2001)Mrs. Frizzle 1
Medieval Castle (2003)Mrs. Frizzle 2
Imperial China (2005)Mrs. Frizzle 3

 Class, were in the late triassic period—the time of the early dinosaurs! 

[Jun 2015]

Timecop
by Mark Verheiden (Peter Hyams, director)
First release: 14 Sep 1994

When I was a teen, my friends and I (hi Dan and Paul) produced a fanzine called Free Fall. What’s that got to do with Timecop? For a short time, I was part of a group called APA 5, which Paul introduced me to. We would all send our fanzines to a central location, where they would be collated and the resulting giant fanzine sent back to each of us—one of whom was the eventual Hollywood writing success, Mark Verheiden. Oh, and in this movie, Time Enforcement Commission agent Van Damme goes back in time to blow lots of stuff up in hopes of saving his already-blown-up wife.

 I cant tell you anything. Hell send somebody back to wipe out my grandparents. Itll be like Ive never existed. My mother, my father, my wife, my kids, my fucking cat. 

[Sep 2012]

The Simpsons
created by Matt Groening
First time travel: 30 Oct 1994



Homer’s first time travel was part of the fifth Halloween montage in a segment called “Time and Punishment” (aka “Homer’s Time Travel Nightmare”) where each tiny dinosaur he stomps on alters his own life. The next bit I saw