The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 1972 to 2017



   There Will Be TIme
by Poul Anderson
First publication: 1972

The doctor and confidant of Jack Havig relates Jack’s life story from the time the infant started disappearing and reappearing to the extended firefight through time with the few other time travelers that Havig encountered.

 No, no, no. I suppose it’s simply a logical impossibility to change the past, same as it’s logically impossible for a uniformly colored spot to be both red and green. 


   “When We Went to See
the End of the World”

by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Universe 2, Feb 1972

Nick and Jane are disappointed when they discover that they are not the only ones from their social group to have time-tripped to see some aspect or other of the end of the world.

 “It looked like Detroit after the union nuked Ford,” Phil said. “Only much, much worse.” 




   “Against the Lafayette Escadrille”
by Gene Wolfe
First publication: Again Dangerous Visions, Mar 1972

I’m a little surprised at how much I am enjoying Gene Wolfe’s stories. This is a fantasy of a man who builds an exact replica of a Fokker triplane; then, one day on a flight, he sees a beautiful girl in a vintage balloon, an event that seems explicable only via time travel. The story puts me in the mood of Jack Finney’s wonderful non-time-travel story, “Home Alone.”

 I circled her for some time then, she turning slowly in the basket to follow the motion of my plane, and we talked as well as we could with gestures and smiles. 




   Slaughterhouse-Five
adaptation by Stephen Geller
First release: 15 Mar 1972

Billy Pilgrim’s life, unstuck in time, is faithfully brought to the big screen, including fellow patient Mr. Rosewater who, I believe, is reading a Kilgore Trout story.

 I have come unstuck in time. 




   “The Man Who Walked Home”
by James Tiptree, Jr.
First publication: Amazing, May 1972

After an accident at a temporal research facility in Idaho, a manlike monster shows up once a year at the same time every year.

As early as the 1930s, stories have addressed the issue of the Earth moving to a different position when a time traveler moves through time. This story addresses the issue by saying that the time traveler appears only once per year, but that doesn't really solve the problem for so many reasons, starting with the fact that a given position on the surface of the Earth will not be at “the same” position in the subsequent year.

 HE APPEARS ON THIS SPOT IN THE ANNUAL INSTANTS IN WHICH HIS COURSE INTERSECTS OUR PLANETS ORBIT AND HE IS APPARENTLY ABLE TO TOUCH THE GROUND IN THOSE INSTANTS. 


   “Forever to a Hudson Bay Blanket”
by James Tiptree, Jr.
First publication: Fantastic, Aug 1972

At 75, heiress Loolie Aerovulpa travels back to her nubile teenaged body to throw herself at her one true love, Dovy Rapelle.

 “Do you like me? Im attractive, amt I?” She opened the blanket to look at herself. “I mean, am I attractive to you? Oh, Dovy, s-say something! Ive come so far, I chartered three jets, I, I,—Oh, Dovy d-darling! 


   “Proof”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Amazing, Sep 1972

Jackson, a reporter, wants proof that a time machine really works, and he also wouldn’t mind proof about who killed Seantor Burton 20 years ago.

 The Time Chamber. with its loose-hanging power cables and confused-looking control panel, didnt look much like Mr. Wells crystal bicycle. 




  
 Dancers at the End of Time #1
An Alien Heat
by Michael Moorcock
First publication: Oct 1972

The time machine from Moorcock’s earlier “Behold the Man‘ allows Jherek to pursue his romantic interest, Amelia Underwood, from Jherek’s own time to her Victorian age.

According to the alien Yusharisp, Jherek’s time is at the end of the universe, which allows this story to be billed as the last love story of the universe. However, the phrase ’last story’ might be slightly inappropriate for the first story of a series that includes three other novels and five short stories. The first three novels, including this one, are gathered in an omnibus edition called The Dancers at the End of Time.

 “Yes,” said Jherek. “I have already met the time-traveller. Last night. At the Duke of Queens. I was so impressed by the costume that I made one up for myself.” 






   The End of Time Series
by Michael Moorcock
First book: Oct 1972

Every now and then, a time traveler finds his way to the End of Time where a small group of decadent immortals manipulate matter and energy with power rings.
  1. 1. An Alien Heat, Oct 1972 Dancer Trilogy 1
  2. 2. The Hollow Lands, 1974 Dancer Trilogy 2
  3. 3. Pale Roses, 1974 in New Worlds 7
  4. 4. The End of All Songs, Jul 1976 Dancer Trilogy 3
  5. 5. White Stars, Mar 1975 in New Worlds 8
  6. 6. Ancient Shadows, Nov 1975 in New Worlds 9
  7. 7. Legends from the End of Time, 1976
         aka Tales from the End of Time includes 3,5,6
     
  8. 8. Transformation of Miss Mavis Ming, Feb 1977
         aka A Messiah at the End of Time Expands Constant Fire
     
  9. 9. The Dancers at the End of Time, 1981 includes 1,2,4
  10. 10. Elric at the End of Time, Sep 1981 in Elsewhen
  11. 11. The Murderer’s Song, Aug 1986 in Tales/Forbidden Planet

 Our time travellers, once they have visited the future, are only permitted (owing to the proerties of Time itself) at best brief returns to their present. 


   “(Now + n, Now - n)”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Nova 2, Oct 1972

Investor Aram Kevorkian has the unique advantage that he can communicate with himselves 48 hours yore and 48 hours hence, until he falls in love with Selene who dampens his psychic powers and his trading profits.

 “Go ahead, (now + n),” he tells me. ((To him I am (now + n). To myself I am (now). Everything is relative; n is exactly forty-eight hours these days.)) 


   “Stretch of Time”
by Ruth Berman
First publication: Analog, Oct 1972

Sylvia Fontis at Luna University has built a working time machine—she calls it the Dimensional Revolver—but she’s too scared to use it until Professor Kent comes up with an idea for an experiment.

 So what did you do, bring back the results of the Centauri Probe? Kill your grandmother? 




   The Brady Kids
directed by Hal Sutherland
First time travel: 16 Dec 1972

The kids, sans Alice and parents, starred in their own cartoon show with magical adventures including at least one time-travel incident where Marlon the wizard bird changes places with Merlin—all directed by Hal Sutherland, the soon-to-be director of the animated Star Trek.

 Boys: ♫Meet three sisters,
Girls: Now meet their brothers,
Marcia: Gregs the leader and a good man for the job.
Jan: Theres another boy, by the name of Peter,
Cindy: The youngest one is Bob.
Boys: See our sisters: Theyre all quite pretty.
Greg: First theres Marcia, with her eyes a sparklin’ blue.
Peter: Then theres Jan, the middle one, whos really groovy,
Bobby: And sister Cindy, too.
Boys: Lets get set now, for action and adventure, as we see things we never saw before.
Girls: Well meet Mop Top and Ping and Pong, the pandas, and Marlon who has voices by the score.
All: The Brady kids, the Brady kids, its the world of your friends the Brady kids!♫ 




   “The Greatest Television Show on Earth”
by J.G. Ballard
First publication: Ambit, Winter 1972/73

Wildly popular global tv stations are desperate for new material for their viewers, so the discovery of time travel in 2001 will be a fortuitous boon if it can live up to its hype.

 These safaris into the past cost approximately a million dollars a minute. After a few brief journeys to verify the Crucifixion, the signing of Magna Carta and Columbuss discovery of the Americas, the government-financed Einstein Memorial Time Centre at Princeton was forced to suspend operations.
Plainly, only one other group could finance further explorations into the past—the worlds television corporations.
 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
Green Darkness by Anya Seton, Nov 1972 [reincarnation ]



   Frankenstein Unbound
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: 1973

When the weapons of war-torn 2020 open time slips that unpredictably mix places and times, grandfather Joe Boderland finds himself and his nuclear-powered car in 1816 Switzerland along with the seductive Mary Shelley, a maniacal Victor Frankenstein, and Frankenstein’s monster.

 You know, Joe, you are my first reader! A pity you don’t remember my book a little better! 




   The Man Who Folded Himself
by David Gerrold
First publication: 1973

Reluctant college student Danny Eakins inherits a time belt from his uncle, and he uses it over the rest of his life to come to know himself.

 The instructions were on the back of the clasp—when I touched it lightly, the words TIMEBELT, TEMPORAL TRANSPORT DEVICE, winked out and the first “page” of directions appeared in their place. 








   Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon Stories
by Spider Robinson
First story: Analog, Feb 1973

At Mike Callahan’s bar, the regulars listen to the tall tales of all time travelers (and others including aliens, vampires, talking dogs, etc.).
  1. The Guy with the Eyes (Feb 1973) Analog
  2. The Time-Traveler (Apr 1974) Analog
  3. The Law of Conservation of Pain (Dec 1974) Analog
  4. Two Heads Are Better Than One (May 1975) Analog
  5. Unnatural Causes (Oct 1975) Analog
  6. A Voice Is Heard in Ramah . . . (Nov 1975) Analog
  7. The Centipede’s Dilemma (1977) in Crosstime Saloon
  8. Just Dessert (1977) in Crosstime Saloon
  9. The Wonderful Conspiracy (1977) in Crosstime Saloon
  10. Dog Day Evening (Oct 1977) Analog
  11. Mirror/rorriM off the Wall (Nov 1977) Analog
  12. Fivesight (Jul 1979) Omni
  13. Have You Heard the One . . .? (Jun 1980) Analog
  14. Pyotr’s Story (12 Oct 1981) Analog
  15. Involuntary Man’s Laughter (Dec 1983) Analog
  16. The Blacksmith’s Tale (Dec 1985) Analog
  17. The Mick of Time (May 1986) Analog
  18. The Paranoid (from Lady) (Winter 1988) in Pulphouse: Issue Two
  19. Callahan’s Lady (1989) 11 connected stories
  20. Lady Slings the Booze (1991) aka Kill the Editor
  21. The Callahan Touch Mary’s Place book
  22. The Immediate Family (Jan 1993) Analog
  23. The End of the Painbow (Jul 1993) Analog
  24. Off the Wall at Callahan’s 1994
  25. Callahan’s Legacy (1996) collection of quotes
  26. Post Toast (circa 1996) USENET group alt.callahans
  27. Callahan’s Key (2000) new novel
  28. Callahan’s Con (2003) new novel
  29. Too Hot Too Hoot (from Legacy) (Oct 2006) in This Is My Funniest

 And as Callahan refilled glasses all around, the time traveler told us his story. 


   “Linkage”
by Barry N. Malzberg
First publication: Demon Kind, Mar 1973

Donald Alan Freem is only eight, but he’s been institutionalized because of delusions that a time-traveling alien gave him the power to make people do whatever he wants.

 I made you say that. 








   Mad Magazine Movie Spoofs
cornballing by Alfred E. Newman
First time travel spoof: Mar 1973

As a kid, there were always too many comic books to read for me to have much interest in Mad, but in later years, I enjoyed the time-travel movie spoofs (though I’m unsure whether all the spoofs actually included time travel).
  1. The Planet That Went Ape and its sequels (Mar 1973)
  2. Superduperman: The Movie (Jul 1979)
  3. Bleak for the Future (Jan 1986)
  4. Peggy Got Stewed and Married (Apr 1987)
  5. Star Blecch IV: The Voyage Bombs (Jun 1987)
  6. Bleak for the Future Part II (Jun 1990)
  7. Iterminable Too Misjudgment Day (Jan 1992)
  8. Groundhog Deja Vu (Sep 1993)
  9. Star Blecch: Worst Contact (Dec 1996)
  10. Corntact (Nov 1997)
  11. Planet of the Remakes (Nov 2001)
  12. Interminable 3 Rise of the Bad Scenes (Aug 2003)

 For some reason which will never be satisfactorily explained, I have been transported back in time to 1960! I must remember that Im now eighteen and not forty-three! Its great to be young again and be back in the good old days when I had nothing to worry about except SATs . . . and acne . . . braces . . . and being flat chested and living with insensitive parents . . . and . . . hey, get me out of here and back to the present! 

—from Peggy Got Stewed and Married


   “Paths”
by Edward Bryant
First publication: Vertex, Apr 1973

A traveler from the future makes his way to Morisel’s office to warn the reporter about the consequences of continued mindless rape of the environment.

In addition to acknowledging that Ed Bryant’s stories are among my favorites, I can also add that he is a kind and generous mentor to writers in the Denver area, including myself!

 I dont want to seem cynical. You may be my ten-times-removed egg-father or something, but right now its awfully hard not to believe youre just a run-of-the-mill aberrant. I mean, here you crawl into my office close to midnight, spread yourself down, and then calmly announce youre a traveler from the future. 




   ドラえもん
English title: Doraemon (translated from Japanese)
created by Fujiko F. Fujio
First episode: 1 Apr 1973

Doraemon, an imperfect, talking, cat-shaped robot from the futute, imperfectly helps young Nobita through coming-of-age problems. Neither the short-lived 1973 anime series nor the 26-year-long 1979 series made it to English-language tv, but English dubs of the third revival (665 episodes and counting) began airing on the Disney channel in 2014 as Doraemon: Gadget Cat from the Future.

The original manga comic was created by Fujiko F. Fujio.

 I wouldnt get bogged down in the details right now. The thing to focus on is that ve come here to save you from a horrible fate. 

—“All the Way from the Future World”




   Time Enough for Love
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Jun 1973

During his 2000 years of misadventures, Lazarus Long has loved and lost and loved again, so now he’s to die, unless Minerva can think of an exciting adventure: perhaps visiting his own childhood?

 This sad little lizard told me he was a brontosaurus on his mothers side. I did not laugh, people who boast of ancestry often have little else to sustain them. Humoring them costs nothing and adds to happiness in a world in which happiness is always in short supply. 


Pendulum Classics (1973)

Marvel Classics 2 (1976)

Academic Industries (1984)

   Pendulum Classics’ The Time Machine
aka Marvel Classics Comics 2
adapted by Otto Binder and Alex Niño
First publication: Jun 1973

There’s a papal dispensation (straight from Clifford Simak) that allows me to list all comic book adaptations of The Time Machine, even if they appeared after 1969. This Alex Niño version was printed as a small black and white graphic novel at least twice (Pendulum Press B&W 1973 and Academic Industries Pocket Classics 1984,). I haven’t seen it directly, but I recently found out that it was colored and printed as the second issue of the Marvel Classics series (cover by Gil Kane), which I first read in Pullman in early 1976. The storyline follows the 1960 movie closely.

 As a trial, Ill just pull the future lever a short ways. 




   Idaho Transfer
aka Nuclear Escape
by Thomas Matthiesen (Peter Fonda, director)
First release: 15 Jun 1973

A group of secretive scientists develop time travel near Idaho’s Craters of the Moon, discovering a near-future apocalypse. Since anyone much over age 20 can’t survive traveling, they’re in the process of sending a group of young people, including Isa and her withdrawn sister Karen, beyond the apocalypse to rebuild civilization. Things go wrong (not the least of which are the plot, the dialogue,the acting, the sound track, and the requirement that the young Jane Fonda lookalikes must strip to travel through time), but even so, the film has a certain unprepossessing appeal.

 You see, Dad and Lewis are trying to get it together, to secretly transfer a lot of young people into the future, bypassing the eco-crisis or whatever it is. Start a new civilization. 




   “12:01 P.M.”
by Richard Lupoff
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sep 1973

Myron Castleman is reliving 59 minutes of one day over and over for eternity.

 And Myron Castleman would be permitted to lie forever, piling up experiences and memories, but each of only an hour’s duration, each resumed at 12:01 PM on this balmy spring day in Manhattan, standing outside near the Grand Central Tower. 




   Star Trek: The Animated Series
directed by Hal Sutherland and Bill Reed
First time travel: 15 Sep 1973

This series has a special place in my heart because of the day in 1974 when Dan Dorman and I visited Hal Sutherland north of Seattle to interview him for our fanzine, Free Fall. He treated the two teenagers like royalty and made two lifelong fans.

I think the series had only one time-travel story, “Yesteryear” (written by D.C. Fontana), which was the second in Sutherland’s tenure. In that episode, Spock returns from a time-traveling mission to find that he’s now in a reality where he died at age 7, and hence he returns to his own childhood to save himself.

 Captains Log, Supplemental: When we were in the time vortex, something appears to have changed the present as we know it. No one aboard recognizes Mr. Spock. The only answer is that the past was—somehow—altered. 


   “Road Map”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Clairion III, Oct 1973

When Ralph Ascione dies, he is reincarnated as a female baby—but in what year and exactly which female?

 A new sound came; in the blurred distances, something moved. Vaguely seen, a huge face looked over him and made soft, deep clucking noises. Then he understood. 




   Love, American Style
First time travel: 23 Oct 1973

Even today, these vignettes hold a certain charm, although they’re also full of plot holes, and the one time travel episode has logic holes sufficient to drive a Delorean through. Even so, the episode “Love and the Time Machine” is the earliest presentation that I remember where a time machine provides multiple opportunities for a spurned suitor to court the object of his desire.

 Just think, Doctor, the time barrier broken at last. This puts you up there with Albert Einstein! Isaac Newton! Leonard Nimoy!! 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Sketches Among the Ruins of My Mind” by Philip José Farmer, Nova 3, 1973 [memory tricks ]

Dragonriders of Pern #2.1: “The Smallest Dragonboy” by Anne McCaffrey, 1973 [no time travel ]

“A Witch in Time” by Janet Fox, Sep 1973 [differing time rates ]

Sleeper by Woody Allen, 17 Dec 1973 [long sleep ]



   “Big Game”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Before the Golden Age, 1974

Jack Trent hears a half-drunken story of time travel and the real cause of the dinosaur extinction.

Asimov wrote this story in 1941, but it was lost until I found it in the Boston University archives in the early ’70s. Okay, maybe that fan who found it wasn’t me, but it could have been!

 Jack looked at Hornby solemnly. “You invented a time machine, did you?”
   “Long ago.” Hornby smiled amiably and filled his glass again. “Better than the ones those amateurs at Stanford rigged up. I’ve destroyed it, though. Lost interest.”
 




   “A Little Something for Us Tempunauts”
by Philip K. Dick
First publication: Final Stage, 1974

Addison Doug and his two fellow time travelers seem to have caused a time loop wherein everyone is reliving the same events with only vague memories of what happened on the previous loop.

 Every man has more to live for than every other man. I dont have a cute chick to sleep with, but Id like to see the semis rolling along the Riverside Freeway at sunset a few more times. Its not what you have to live for; its that you want to live to see it, to be there—thats what is so damn sad. 


   “The Marathon Photograph”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Threads of Time, 1974

I feel for one character in this story: Humphrey, who wants no more than to figure out the various goings on—past, present and possibly future—in this out-of-the-way place where Andrew Thornton comes to fish and write a geology text, Andrew’s friend Neville Piper finds a cube with the a hologram of the Battle of Marathon alongside the bear-maulted body of the mysterious Stefan from the even more mysterious Lodge, and that long-lost mine that Humphrey has been researching is finally found without Humphrey ever being told of it.

 Humphrey did mind, naturally, but there was nothing he could do about it. Here was the chance to go up to the Lodge, probably to go inside it, and he was being counted out. But he did what he had to do with fairly good grace and said that he would stay. 


   “Master Ghost and I”
by Barbara Softly
First publication: The Tenth Fontana Book of Great Ghost Stories, 1974

A 17th century soldier inherits a house with a squatter from the future.

 “D-dark?” he stammered. “Ill switch on the light.” 




   CBS Mystery Radio Theater
created by Himan Brown
First time travel: 31 Jan 1974

The fun mp3 files include radio news, weather, commercials and more from the 70s, all surrounding the mystery story hosted by E.G. Marshall. Here are the time-travel episodes that I’ve found so far, including two (in July 1976 and March 1977) by Grand Master Alfred Bester.
  1. The Man Who Asked for Yesterday (31 Jan 1974) to the previous day
  2. Yesterday’s Murder (27 Jun 1974) heroine redoes her life
  3. Come Back with Me (2 Jul 1975) hero relives favorite times
  4. Assassination in Time (26 Sep 1975) to Lincoln’s assasination
  5. The Lap of the Gods (25 Nov 1975) sea captain in the 1820s
  6. A Connecticut Yankee . . . (8 Jan 1976) to Camelot
  7. There’s No Business Like (19 Jan 1976) to 2076
  8. The Covered Bridge (23 Mar 1976) a feminist to the 1770s
  9. Time Killer (5 Apr 1976) before Great Depression
  10. Future Eye (19 Jul 1976) 2976 detective to 1976
  11. Now You See Them, Now You Don’t (12 Mar 1977) back from World War V
  12. A Point of Time (15 Nov 1977) overthrow dictator in 2200
  13. The Time Fold (16 Mar 1978) from 1979 to far future
  14. Time Out of Mind (18 May 1978) to World War II
  15. The Winds of Time (16 Oct 1978) heroine secures closure
  16. The Time Box (18 Feb 1980) to the 1880s
  17. The Man of Two Centuries (29 Apr 1981) Huron travels centuries
  18. The Old Country (24 Mar 1982) back to World War II

 This is our bicentennial year: a time to pause and count our blessings. And among the greatest of these are the men and women of letters who flourished in our native land, who created a literature that was both typically American and universally admired. 

—host E.G. Marshall in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court


   “If Ever I Should Leave You”
by Pamela Sargent
First publication: If, Feb 1974

A nameless narrator (called Nanette by an overly zealous copy-editor in the If publication) tells of time-traveler Yuri’s return as a dying old man and of the subsequent times when she visited him. I enjoyed that beginning part of the story, but the ending, as the narrator herself ages, spoke to me more deeply.

I met Pamela Sargent in Lawrence, Kansas, at Jim Gunn’s writing workshop. She was insightful and kind to the writers her came to learn from her and other talented writers.

 All the coordinates are there, all the places and times I went to these past months. When you're lonely, when you need me, go to the Time Station and Ill be waiting on the other side. 




   Future Tense
created by Eli Segal
First time travel: 7 May 1974

Professor Eli Segal and her students at Western Michigan College created quality new productions of radio shows that were mostly taken from old episodes of X Minus One and Dimension X. According to otr.org, the first season of Future Tense 18 stories (13 based on X-1 scripts, two based on DX scripts, and 3 original scripts) and these first aired as 16 episodes in May of 1974. The second season had ten episodes (8 based on X-1 scripts and 2 original scripts) which aired in July 1976, At least three episodes involved time travel. Now why couldn’t I have gone to WMC?
  1. The Old Die Rich (7 May 1974) sleuth forced into time machine
  2. The Discovery of Morniel Mathaway (July 1976)    art critic from 25th century
  3. An Imbalance of Species (July 1976) from “A Sound of Thunder’

 Stay tuned now for excitement and adventure in the world of the future! Entertainment for the entire family produced right here in Kalamazoo. 




   “The Birch Clump Cylinder”
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Stellar 1, Sep 1974

When a contraption drops onto the Coon Creek Institute causing various objects to appear and disappear from out of time, Old Prather calls together three former students: someone with expertise in time travel (our discredited time-travel researcher and narrator, Charley Spencer), one whos a mean-spirited, world-famous mathematician (Leonard Asbury), and with no preconceptions about the matter (the lovely composer, Mary Holland, who broken more than one heart on the campus).

 A time machine has fallen into a clump of birch just above the little pond back of the machine shops. 


   “Renaissance Man”
by T.E.D. Klein
First publication: Space 2: A Collection of Science Fiction Stories, 5 Sep 1974

When the new time machine randomly grabs a random man from the future, all the waiting bigwigs and reporters are delighted that they managed to catch a scientist for the six-hour interview.

 We knew wed pull back someone from the Harvard Physics Department, because were here in the building right now. But it could have been just anyone. We might have found ourselve questioning a college freshman . . . Or a scrubwoman . . . Or even a tourist visiting the lab. 




  Dancers at the End of Time #2
The Hollow Lands
by Michael Moorcock
First publication: Oct 1974

Still in pursuit of Amelia Underwood, Jherek again travels to Victorian England where he runs into her husband (oh, yes, that quaint Victorian Mrs. nomenclature) and a disbelieving H.G. Wells.

 “No true Eloi should be able to read or write.” Mr. Wells puffed on his pipe, peering out of the window. 


   “Retroflex”
by F.M. Busby
First publication: Vertex, Oct 1974

Haldene tracks down a man named Cochrane, who turns out to be a killer from the future.

 The one calling himself Cochrane is not of this era, but of a time far forward. 


   “If This Is Winnetka,
You Must Be Judy”

by F.M. Busby
First publication: Universe 5, Nov 1974

Larry Garth skips from year to year in his life (not linearly, of course), waiting to meet his once and future wife, Elaine.

 He lit a cigarette and leafed through the cards and minutiae that constituted his identity in the outside world. Well . . . knowing himself, his drivers permit would be up-to-date and all credit cards unexpired. The year was 1970. Another look outside: autumn. So he was thirty-five, and the pans clattered at the hands of Judy. 


The story also appeared in the 1979 anthology, The Gollancz/Sunday Times Best SF Stories

   “Let’s Go to Golgotha!”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Sunday Times Weekly Review, 15 Dec 1974

A typical family of four decide to go with their best friends to see the cruxifiction of Jesus.

 If youre talking about time-tours, why dont you come with us? Were going to see the Cruxifiction. 






   Sesame Street
created by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett
First time travel: 20 Dec 1974

From his early days, Kermit brought news reports to Sesame Street. I don't know when he first reported from back in history, so I’ll arbitrarily say that the first one was his interview of Christopher Columbus in Episode 700 shortly before Christmas in 1974.

In the 35th anniversary special, “The Street We Live On,” Grover takes Elmo on a trip through time to see how the street was in the past. Also, in a PBS special, “Elmo Saves Christmas,” the red guy visits a future Christmas.

 Columbus: But, say, what time is it?
Kermit: Oh, its about, ah, 1492. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
The Forever War by Joe Haldeman, 1974 [time dilation ]

Land of the Lost by Sid Krofft and Marty Krofft, 7 Sep 1974 [parallel universes ]

   “Trying to Connect You”
by John Rowe Townsend
First publication: The Eleventh Ghost Book, 1975

A man realizes the mistake he made with Elaine, and he desperately searches for a phone booth to call her before she leaves the country forever, but others want the phone booth, too, for a series of disasters that haven’t yet happened.

 Twenty-four hours after I left her, I knew I was wrong and knew what I should have said. 




   “Anniversary Project”
by Joe Haldeman
First publication: Analog, Oct 1975

One million years after the invention of writing, Three-Phasing (nominally male) brings a 20th century man and his wife forward in time to teach the ancestors of man how to read.

 “Pleasta Meetcha, Bob. Likewise, Sarah. Call me, uh . . .“ The only twentieth-century language in which Three-phasings name makes sense is propositional calculus. “ George. George Boole.” 




  Time at the Top #2
Time at the Top
by Edward Ormondroyd
First publication: Nov 1963

At the end of the first book, motherless Susan Shaw has finally convinced her father to at least try the whole elevator-to-1881 business. After that, well, of course her father will marry the widowed Mrs. Walker, and Susan will live happily ever after in the past with her new sister and brother, Vicky and Bobbie. Unless—no, it couldn’t be!—what if Mr. Shaw sees things differently?

 Mr. Shaw rallied. “No, no, thank you, frog in my throat. Im all right. Really pleased to meet you, too. Im ah – its just that – oh, look here, Im having a hard time taking all this in. I mean, Susans told me an incredible story about herself and you –” 




   “Timetipping”
by Jack Dann
First publication: Epoch, Nov 1975

People, animals (or at least parts of them), and a reluctant wandering Jew are tossed back and forth through alternate realities at various times.

 Nothing was for certain, anything could change (depending on your point of view), and almost anything could happen, especially to forgetful old men who often found themselves in the wrong century rather than on the wrong street. 




  
 Humboldt #1
Time Piper
by Delia Huddy
First publication: 1976

In the first of two books Luke meets an out-of-place girl named Hare, and given all the tachyon flying around, he begins to suspect that Tom Humboldt—the head of Luke’s summer research project—has pulled Hare from the past.

A sequel, The Humboldt Effect, picks up Luke’s life several years later.

 She was strange, remote, and beautiful, and she called herself “Hare.” 








   The Chronopath Stories
by Steven Utley
First story: Galaxy, Jan 1976

I’ve read only the first of this series of stories which predates Utley’s better known Silurian tales. The first-person narrator, Bruce Holt, tells of his power (which he didn’t ask for and has no control over) of traveling through time and being deposited in other beings’ minds for a brief few seconds at a time.
  1. Getting Away (Jan 1976) Galaxy
  2. Predators (Oct 1976) The Ideas of Tomorrow
  3. To 1966 (Spring 1977) Chacal
  4. Spectator Sport (Jul 1977) Amazing
  5. The Maw (Jul 1977) F&SF
  6. Time and Hagakure (Winter 1977) Asimovs
  7. Where or When (Jan 1991) Asimovs
  8. The Glowing Cloud (Jan 1992) Asimovs
  9. Now That We Have Each Other (Jul 1992)   Asimovs
  10. One Kansas Night (Jun 1994) Asimovs
  11. Living It (Aug 1994) Asimovs
  12. Staying in Storyville (Dec 2006) in When or Where
  13. Life’s Work (Dec 2006) in When or Where
  14. The Here and Now (Mar 1998) Asimovs

 What do you want me to do? Go back and find out where Captain Kidd buried his loot? 

—“Getting Away”




   Time Travelers
by Jackson Gillis (Alexander Singer, director)
First aired: 19 Mar 1976

ABC-tv picked up this failed pilot (a proposed revival of The Time Tunnel) and aired it as a made-for-tv movie in which Dr. Clinton Earnshaw and his government-sent sidekick Jeff Adams venture back to 1871 to track down a cure for a modern-day epidemic.

 For your information, medical historians have been digging into that puzzle for years without any luck at all. So unless somehow—miraculously—you have discovered Dr. Hendersons diaries in the last couple of hours . . . 




   “Birth of a Notion”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Amazing, Apr 1976

The world’s first time traveler, Simeon Weill, goes back to 1925 and gives some ideas to Hugo.

 That the first inventor of a workable time machine was a science fiction enthusiast is by no means a coincidence. 




   “An Infinite Summer”
by Christopher Priest
First publication: Andromeda, May 1976

For purposes that only they can know, people from the future—Thomas Lloyd calls them “freezers”—put a small number of people into a kind of suspended animation. Nobody can see the frozen except for those who have been previously frozen and then thawed. Thomas himself is among this select group: frozen in 1903 on the verge of proposing to his beloved Sarah; unfrozen shortly before World War II, at which point he can but view his still-frozen Sarah.

 Thomas James Lloyd, straw hat raised in his left hand, his other hand reaching out. His right knee was slightly bent, as if he were about to kneel, and his face was full of happiness and expectation. A breeze seemed to be ruffling his hair, for three strands stood on end, but these had been dislodged when he removed his hat. A tiny winged insect, which had settled on his lapel, was frozen in its moment of flight, an instinct to escape too late. 


   “Balsamo’s Mirror”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 1976

MIT student W. Wilson Newbury has a creepy Lovecraftian friend who is enamored with the 18th century, so naturally they visit an Armenian gypsy who makes them passengers in the bodies of an 18th century pauper and his father.

This story gave me a game that I play of pretending that I have just arrived as a passenger in my own body with no control over my actions or observations. How long does it take to figure out who and where I am? So, I enjoyed that aspect of the story, but I have trouble reading phonetically spelled dialects.

In his autobiography, de Camp says he based the setting of the story on his time as a graduate student at MIT in 1932, when Lovecraft (whom de Camp didn’t know) lived in nearby Providence: “I put H.P. Lovecraft himself, unnamed, into the story and stressed the contrast between his idealized eighteenth-century England and what he would have found if he had actually been translated back there. To get the dialect right, I read Fielding’s Tom Jones.”

 I didnt say that we could or should go back to pre-industrial technology. The changes since then were inevitable and irreversible. I only said . . . 


1982 paperback edition   “Room 409”
by Nance Donkin
First publication: A Handful of Ghosts, Nov 1976

A thirteen-year-old Australian boy on vacation in England gets a key to a room that existed during World War II but no longer does.

 He didnt seem to fit in at all well with the modern decor of the place, but I got the key from him and went towards the lift. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
The Nonsuch Lure by Mary Luke, 1976 [reincarnation ]

Dragonriders of Pern #3 (Harper Hall #1): Dragonsong by Anne McCaffrey, Mar 1976 [no time travel ]

“I See You” by Damon Knight, F↦SF, Nov 1976 [viewing the past ]

The story also appeared in this 1996 collection.   “Execution”
by George Clayton Johnson
First publication: Scripts and Stories written for “The Twilight Zone”, 1977

A man without conscience who’s about to be hung in 1880 is transported to a scientist’s lab in 1960.

Serling turned Johnson’s story into a 1960 Twilight Zone episode, but I’m uncertain whether the story was published before Johnson’s 1977 restrospective collection. Johnson is also well-known for Logan’s Run, with Jenny Agutter but (sadly) no time travel.

 Commonplace, if somewhat grim, unsocial event known as a necktie party. The guest of dishonor, a cowboy named Joe Caswell, just a moment away from a rope, a short dance several feet off the ground, and then the dark eternity of all evil men. Mr. Joe Caswell who, when the good Lord passed out a conscience, a heart, a feeling for fellow man, must have been out for a beer and missed out. Mr. Joe Caswelll, in the last quiet moment of a violent life. 

—Opening narration of the Twilight Zone episode


   The Crisis Stories
by James Gunn
First story: Analog, Mar 1977

Bill Johnson travels from the future to affect important political change at moments of crisis, but each time he makes a change, he also forgets all personal details about himself.
  1. Child of the Sun (Mar 1977) Analog
  2. The End of the World    (Jan 1984) Analog
  3. Man of the Hour (Oct 1984) Analog
  4. Mother of the Year (Apr 1985) Analog
  5. Touch of the Match (Feb 1985) Analog
  6. Will of the Wisp (May 1985) Analog
  7. Crisis! (May 1986) fix-up novel

 But each time you intervene, no matter how subtly, you change the future from which you came. You exist in this time and outside of time and in the future, and so each change makes you forget. 




   The Rook
by Bill DuBay
First publication: Eerie 82, Mar 1977

As you know, post-1969 comic books are not normally permitted on the list, but seeing as how Restin Dane, aka The Rook, is the great, great grandson of Wells’s original traveler (not to mention that the Rook and his Time Castle rescued the traveler at the Alamo in his debut “castling” adventure), how can I not make an exception?

 Mister . . . I dont know who you are, where you came from, or where you got them fancy guns . . . but I want tthank God and San Houston fr sendin’ ya! My name’s Crockett . . . and before you got here, I thought fro sure Id wake up tomorrow shakin’ hands with th’ devil! 




   “Air Raid”
by John Varley
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Spring 1977

Mandy snatches doomed people from the past in order to populate her war-decimated time.

 I had to choose between a panic if the fathead got them to thinking, and a possible panic from the flash of the gun. But when a 20th gets to talking about his “rights” and what he is “owed,&rdauo; things can get out of hand. 


   Time Storm
by Gordon R. Dickson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Spring-Summer 1977

Marc Despard, along with his teenaged friend Girl and their leopard Sunday, travels through an Earth ravenged by storms that push and pull swathes of land from one time to another.
Although the book was published in Oct 1977, it’s first half appeared as two long extracts in the first two issues of Asimovs Science Fiction (“Time Storm” in Spring 1977 and “Across the River” in Summer 1977).

 In the weeks since the whole business of the time changes started, I had not been this close to being caught since that first day in the cabin northwest of Duluth, when I had, in fact, been caught without knowing what hit me. 




   Star Wars
by George Lucas (Lucas, director)
First release: 25 May 1977

I’m just checking that you’re awake. Of course, in Star Wars, time travel no there is. Nevertheless, it gets onto the list simply because the fan-friendly George Lucas instigated an inclusive advertising campaign that sent me a colorful pressbook and an invitation to the opening in May 1977 because (along with Paul Chadwick and Dan Dorman) I was publishing an sf fanzine called Free Fall. Alas, I couldn’t use the invitation because I was falling in love with Janet in Scotland on the day of the premiere.

 I find your lack of faith disturbing. 




   “The Astronomical Hazards of the
Tobacco Habit”

by Dean McLaughlin
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Summer 1977

Whenever an effect of an action occurs before that action itself (i.e., an endochronic property), I consider it to be time travel, with the canonical example being Asimov’s Thiotimoline research first published in 1948. According to McLaughlin, Asimov continued that research, using the profits to establish a foundation that funds further research into such phenomena.

 Dr. Isaac Asimov
Director: Thiotimoline Research Foundation
Trantor MA31416
 


   “Rotating Cylinders and the Possibility of Global Causality Violation”
by Larry Niven
First publication: Analog, Aug 1977

A mathematician named Quifting has a way to use a time machine to end the war with the Hallane Regency once and for all.

 Did nobody ever finish one of these, ah, time machines? 


   “Joelle”
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Fall 1977

Canadian Eruc Stranathan is one of the few people in the world who can merge his mind with computer hardware, taking him to mental vistas beyond that of mere humans. At a conference to explore the possibilities of the technology, he meets the beautiful American Joelle who shares his ability. The two fall deeply in love, but because of security restrictions, it’s fifteen months before she can show him the capabilities of her mind-machine connection.

The time-travel connection is slight in this long story, but it is relevant to Joelle. As I read though, I wondered whether the story could have been much more had the time-travel element been taken more to heart.

 He swept out of the cell, through space and through time, at light-speed across unseen prairies, into the storms that raged down a great particle accelerator. 


Freff’s interior drawing for the story   “Lorelei at Storyville West”
by Sherwood Spring
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Fall 1977

A writer who’s working on a book about Dixieland singers interviews the one man who might have a 1955 tape recording of Ruby Benton whose voice always drew comparisons to the most outstanding singer you’d ever heard. The man does indeed have a recording as well as a theory about why Ruby disappeared from the clubs of Storyville West at the particular time she did.

 The tatoo was obviously her social security number, but it was preceded by an “A” and followed by a space and five additional digits. 


   The Orion Series
by Ben Bova
First story: Weird Heroes 8 (Nov 1977)

Orion the Hunter is tasked by mighty Ormazd to continually battle evil Ahriman, the Dark One. Bova’s first tale chronicles a time thousands of years in the past when Orion is part of a nomadic hunting clan that includes the beautiful Ana whom he has bonded with and loved throughout time.
  1. Title Publication
  2. Floodtide (Nov 1977) in Weird Heroes 8
  3. Orion (1984) incorporates “Floodtide”
  4. Vengeance of Orion (1988)
  5. Orion in the Dying Time (1990)
  6. Orion and the Conqueror    (1984)
  7. Orion among the Stars (1995)
  8. Legendary Heroes (Dec 1996) Dragon Magazine
  9. Orion and King Arthur (2012)

 But even from this distance I could see she was the gray-eyed woman I had known in other eras; the woman I had loved, thousands of years in the future of this world. The woman who had loved me. 

—“Floodtide”, reprinted in the March 1983 Analog






   DC Superhero Cartoons
First time travel: 10 Dec 1977

As you know, I was forced to ban all post-1969 comic books from The List because comic books pretty much fell to pieces after that date. If I discover many more superhero cartoons like these ones, I will be forced to expand the ban.
  1. The Protector (10 Dec 1977) The All New Super Friends Hour
  2. The Time Trap (30 Sep 1978) Challenge of the Super Friends
  3. New Kids in Town (31 Oct 1998) Superman
  4. The Savage Time (9 Nov 2002) Justice League
  5. Day of the Dark Knight! (2 Jan 2009) Batman: The Brave and the Bold   
  6. Staring at the Future (30 Oct 2013) Teen Titans Go!

 It is the fifth century, A.D., the place is Britain, and I am Merlin Ambrosius. 

—“The Day of the Dark Knight!”, Episode 4 of Batman: The Brave and the Bold


   The Backspace Stories
by F.M. Busby
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Winter 1977

After fixing the smog problem by reversing the direction of Earth’s spin, Pete’s flaky friend Sam shows up with device that includes a calendar display and a grey backspace button. That, of course, was in the 1977 story, “Backspace”. I don’t know whether there were any earlier stories of Peter and Sam before the backspace button appeared, but there were several others afterward in Asimovs Science Fiction. In the second story (“Balancing Act”), Sam could still “edit” time, even though he’d burned out the backspace button by stopping World War III. It’s unclear whether this second sort of editing involves time travel, but it is fun to speculate on what I might edit if given the chance.
  1. Backspace (Winter 1977) enter the backspace button
  2. Balancing Act (16 Feb 1981) editing Pete’s bloopers and more
  3. Backup System (26 Oct 1981) Sam’s death causes backspacing
  4. Wrong Number (21 Dec 1981) aliens v. Russia

 My friend Sam is the only person I know who edits events. Which is to say, he does something in his head and the past changes; the alterations, of course also reflect into the present and the future. 

—“Backup System”


I lament that the sf zines of today have relatively few interior illustrations such as this pen and ink drawing by Roy G. Krenkel for Garrett’s story.   “On the Martian Problem”
by Randall Garrett
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Winter 1977

Ed’s “Uncle Jack’ writes to him with an explanation about why the recent Martian landers show such a different Mars than that which Jack himself has visited and written about.

 To the Reader of this Work:
In submitting Captain Carters strange manuscript to you in book form, I believe that a few words relative to this remarkable personality will be of interest.
My first recollection of Captain Carter is of the few months he spent at my fathers home in Virginia, just prior to the opening of the civil war. I was then a child of but five years, yet I well remember the tall, dark, smooth-faced, athletic man whom I called Uncle Jack. . . .
very sincerely yours,
Edgar Rice Burroughs
 

—from the foreward to A Princess of Mars



No Time Travel.
Move along.
Dragonriders of Pern #4 (Harper Hall #2): Dragonsinger by Anne McCaffrey, Feb 1977 [no time travel ]

   The Mirror
by Marlys Millhiser
First publication: 1978

In 1978, 20-year-old Boulder woman exchanges places with her grandmother on the eve of their respective weddings.

Janet and I read this in April, 2011.

 Here, at last, was the man in Grandma Brans wedding picture in the hall. 


The story also appeared in this 1986 collection.   “Threads of Time”
aka “The Threads of Time”
by C.J. Cherryh
First publication: Darkover Grand Council Program Book IV, 1978

Although I’ve enjoyed many of Cherryh’s novels (first suggested to me by my academic advisor, David B. Benson), this particular vignette was a plotless mishmash of alien artifact time-gates and time cops patrolling the baddies who would wipe out history as we (or the qhal) would know it.

 But never go back. Never tamper. Never alter the past. 




   A Traveller in Time
adapted by Doame Devere Cole
First episode: 4 Jan 1978

The BBC adapted Alison Uttley’s children’s book in a miniseries of five half-hour episodes, faithfully taking young Penelope Taberner Cameron back to Elizabethan England and the time of Mary, Queen of Scots. If you can find the British DVD, you'll even hear Simon Gipps-Kent regale Penelope with Greensleeves”.

 ♫Alas, my love, you do me wrong
To cast me off, discourteously♫
 


I’m not sure when this commemorative plate was issued for the cartoon.

   A Connecticut Rabbit in King Arthur’s Court
produced, directed and plagiarized by Chuck Jones
First airing: 23 Feb 1978

This half-hour Warner Brother’s cartoon was shown on tv a few times and then released on VHS as Bugs Bunny in King Arthur’s Court. With the help of Way Bwadbuwy, Bugs finds himself in Camelot, whereupon he brings about a dragon-powered steampunk age.

 Never again—never, never again—do I take travel hints from Ray Bradbury! Huh! Him and his short cuts! 


   “Grimes at Glenrowan”
by A. Bertram Chandler
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar/Apr 1978

Bertram’s widely traveled, spacefaring captain John Grimes had at least one adventure through time which he told to a pretty reporter named Kitty on the Rim World of Elsinore. It seems that when Grimes was a much younger spacehand on leave in his native Australia, he once ran into two former crewmates who had figured out how to project themselves and Grimes into their own nefarious ancestors in the 1880 outback.

I’m still searching for other time travel stories about Grimes or Chandler’s Rim Worlds.

 “I built it,” said Kelly, not without pride.
“What for?” I asked. “Time Travel?” I sneered.
“Yes,” he said.
 




   Mastodonia
aka Catface
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: Mar 1978

Asa Steele buys a farm near his boyhood farm in southwestern Wisconsin where the loyal Bowser and his simple friend Hiram talk to a lonely time-traveling alien who opens time roads for the three of them.

 Maybe it takes gently crazy people and simpletons and dogs to do things we can’t do. Maybe they have abilities we don’t have. . . . 


interior art by George Barr   “The Small Stones of Tu Fu”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar/Apr 1978

A time traveler enjoys spending time with the aged poet Tu Fu in 770 A.D.

 Swimming strongly on my way back to what the sage called the remote future, my form began to flow and change according to time pressure. Sometimes my essence was like steam, sometimes like a mountain. 




   The Hitchhiker’s Guide
to the Galaxy

by Douglas Adams
First time travel: BBC Radio, 29 Mar 1978

Apart from the original radio programs that I listened to in Stirling on my study abroad, the travails of Arthur Dent dodging Vogons never inflamed my passion—and I’m not quite sure where time travel slipped into the further radio shows, books, tv shows, movies and video games (which I won’t list here, apart from noting Tim’s favorite quote from The Restaurant at the End of the Universe: “There was an accident with a contraceptive and a time machine. Now concentrate!” Still, those original radio shows got me laughing, including the first moment of time travel in the 4th episode.

The radio series spawned six books and at least one time-travel infused short story.
  1. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1979)
  2. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980)
  3. Life, the Universe and Everything (1982)
  4. So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (1984)
  5. “Young Zaphod Plays It Safe” (1986) in The Hitchhiker’s Quartet
  6. Mostly Harmless (1992)
  7. And Another Thing . . . (2009) by Eoin Colfer

 For instance, at the very moment that Arthur Dent said, “I seem to be having this tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle,” a freak wormhole opened up in the fabric of the space-time continuum and carried his words far, far back in time across almost infinite reaches of space, to a distance galaxy where strange and war-like beings were poised on the brink of frightful interstellar battle. 

—from the 4th radio episode


   “The Last Full Measure”
by George Alec Effinger
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May/Jun 1978

Corporal Bo Staefler lands and dies on Normandy Beach on D-Day, after which an alien brings him back to life and asks him to do it all again (and again), making sure to pay attention to all the details.

 He went through every moment, every step, every ragged breath, every slow, wading, stumbling yard through the cold water to the beach. And it all felt the same, as though he were just a spectator. The shell exploded. Staefler died a second time. 




  Dragonriders of Pern #5
The White Dragon
by Anne McCaffrey
First publication: Jun 1978

Young Jaxom of Ruatha Hold is a lord, so of course, he’s not supposed to impress himself on a dragon. But then again, the stunted white dragon Ruth wasn’t supposed to be big enough to fly with a rider either. Nevertheless, amidst the Thread and Oldtimers on Pern, Jaxon does impress Ruth, and together they do a few other things that they’re not meant to be doing either.

The story incorporates the novella, “A Time When” (1975), which appeared only as a limited edition at Boskone where McCaffrey was the Guest of Honor.

 Before Jaxom could remind Ruth that they weren’t supposed to go between time, they had. 


   “One Rejection Too Many”
by Paula Nurse
First publication: Asimov’s Clarke’s Science Fiction, Jul/Aug 1978

A time-traveling writer gets more and more fed up with Isaac Asimov’s demands for rewrites on his story submissions.

 Anything you can do to expediate the publishing of Vahls story will be most appreciated, so that he will feel free to return to his own time. 


interior art by Freff

   “The Adventure of the Global Traveler”
aka “The Global Consequences of How the Reichenbach Falls into the Wells of Iniquitie”
by Anne Lear
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep/Oct 1978

Apparently, that trip over the Reichenbach Falls didn’t kill Moriarty after all. Instead, he survived to build a Time Velocipede (which he showed off to some guy named Wells) only to be trapped back in the time of Shakespeare and the Globe Theater.

 Having learned early of the dangers attendant upon being unable to move the Time Machine, I had added to its structure a set of wheels and a driving chain attached to the pedals originally meant simply as foot rests. In short, I converted it into a Time Velocipede. 




   “Nebogipfel at the End of Time”
by Richard Lupoff
First publication: Heavy Metal, Sep 1978

The end of time is as much of a magnet for time travelers as Hitler’s birth, although for a different reason.

 For what seemed like hour upon hour they arrived. Some by strange, grotesque vehicles. Some by spectacularly announced projection. Some by chronion gas, or drugs, or spiritual exercise, or by sheer mental power. Some involuntarily. Some unknowingly. At one point not far inland from the beach, across the first row of dim, ugly dunes, there suddenly appeared an entire city. 




   “Scrap from the Notebooks of
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe”

by K.W. MacAnn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep/Oct 1978

Mephistopheles agrees to take Faust into Hell and one other destination in time.

 Faust and Mephistopheles entered the tavern and shed their heavy overcoats. 


   “Stalking the Timelines”
by Kevin O’Donnell, Jr.
First publication: Analog, Sep 1978

A catlike being lives the life of a soldier in many different times and places, but always with the same goal of stamping out war.

  . . . but in all the lines Im big, tough, and smart enough to know how to take good orders and not hear bad ones. 


   “The Very Slow Time Machine”
by Ian Watson
First publication: Anticipations, Sep 1978

In 1985, a small inpenetrable living pod appears out of nothing at the National Physics Laboratory. A window on one side shows the pod’s occupant: a delirious man who grows younger and saner through the years, although generally doing little other than sitting and reading, leading the observers to conclude that his quarters are in fact a VSTM taking him back through time at the rate of one year for each year of his life.

As of writing this, I am only partway through my reading and wondering so many things: When the man in the world at large who will eventually enter the machine realize that he is the traveler? From his perspective, what happened to the machine (and him!) when it materialized in 1985? (Ah! That question is answered shortly after it occurs to me.) For that matter, why doesn’t he himself, while in the pod, already know that he will reach 1985? To what extent does his very appearance cause the technology that permits his trip to occur? VCIS! (Very Cool Idea-Story!), although it offers little in plot or character.

 Our passenger is the object of popular cults by now—a focus for finer feelings. In this way his mere presence has drawn the worlds peoples closer together, cultivating respect and dignity, pulling us back from the brink of war, liberating tens of thousands from their concentration camps. These cults extend from purely fashionable manifestations—shirts printed with his face, now neatly shaven in a Vandyke style; rings and worry-beads made from galena crystals—through the architectural (octahedron and cube meditation modules) to life-styles themselves: a Zen-like “sitting quietly, doing nothing”. 




Mork and Mindy lived at 1619 Pine Street in Boulder

   Mork and Mindy
produced by Anthony W. Marshall and Garry Marshall
First time travel: 14 Sep 1978

There’s a scene in the first episode where Mork explains that he’s traveling from the 1950s Happy Days to 1978—but that scene did not air until subsequent reruns. The other time travel that I know of is in the penultimate episode where the couple travel via Mork’s ruby red, size eight, time-travel shoes.

 Wait! I have one last request! I would like to die with dignity, with honor, . . . and with my penny-loafers on. 




   “Fair Exchange?”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine, Fall 1978

John Sylva has invented a temporal transference device that allows his friend Herb to enter the mind of a man in 1871 London and to thereby attend three performances of a lost Gilbert & Sullivan play.

I read this story as I was starting my graduate studies in Pullman in 1978. Sadly, there was no second issue of Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine.

 We cant be sure how accurate our estimates of time and place are, but you seem to resonate with someone in London in 1871. 




   The Avatar
by Poul Anderson
First publication: Oct 1978

No, this book has nothing to do with Cameron’s more widely-known movie, although critics have noted a similarity between the movie and an earlier Anderson story, “Call Me Joe.” As for The Avatar, it’s a political story of time-space portals (Tipler cylinders known in the book as T-machines) left behind by the “Others.” Wealthy Daniel Broderson wants to use results of a portal exploration team for the benefit of all mankind, while the authoritarian leaders of Earth thinks that mankind isn’t ready for the full truth.

The title avatar of Anderson’s book is present as one of the portal exploration team members right from the start of the goings-on, but the name avatar isn’t used until the conclusion of the book—and the meaning of the word is the one that predates our modern digital view.

 For us, approximately eight Terrestrial years have passed. It turns out that the T-machine is indeed a time machine of sorts, as well as a space transporter. The Betans—the beings whom we followed—calculated our course to bring us out near the date when we left. 




   “Time Warp”
by Theodore Sturgeon
First publication: Omni, Oct 1978

On the hidden planet of Ceer, Althair tells all the little pups and pammies of the time when he accompanied the brave Will Hawkins and the chief pilot Jonna Verret as they traveled back in time to save Earth from the Meercaths from Orel who had the power to blow up the Earth and would use it whether the Earthlings revealed the secret of time travel or not.

In my first semester of graduate school, I bought the first issue of Omni, which included this story. But I forgot about it until Bill Seabrook (a baseball fan and sf reader from Tyne-and-Wear) sent me a pointer to this story as well as J.B. Priestley’s time plays.

 Well arrive on Orel before they leave and stop them. 


   “One More Time”
by Jack Gaughan
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov/Dec 1978

One thing you can be certain of when you meet a nostalgic physicist in a science fiction story: There’s gonna be some time travelin’. In this case, the nostalgic narrator travels from 1978 back to pastoral American days at the end of the Great Depression with the goal of helping his father stand up to a domineering wife.

Gaughan was better know as a prolific sf artist, but he also produced this story and one other for Asimov’s Science Fiction.

 So I told him.
From beginning to end (well not end, I didnt tell him of his own funeral) and tried to leave nothing out that was pertinent to the plan. I didnt know what else to do. The year 1939 may have been ready for Buck Rogers or Brick Bradford and his Time Top, but was it ready for the hard, cold reality of time travel?
 




   Classics Illustrated’s The Time Machine
adapted by Wallace C. Bennett
First aired: 5 Nov 1978 (made-for-tv)

For me, the updated framing took this made-for-tv movie too far away from the original novel, and the production values were so low that it never got much airing, even if we do get looks at pilgrim witch hunts, the old west, and a dreamy Weena who speaks English.

 In tonights Classics Illustrated presentation, a young scientist hurtles the barrier of time and finds himself locked in a struggle to prevent the destruction Earth in the world of the future—an exciting new version of H.G. Wells’s masterpiece, The Time Machine. 


   “The Humanic Complex”
by Ray Russell
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1978

An amnesiac receives a visit from a tiny creature from the future who offers to grant him any three wishes he wants, but somehow the wishes keep being deflected in a theological direction.

 This may sound pompous, but . . . I wish to know whether or not there is a God. 




   Superman: The Movie
by Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster, Mario Puzo, et. al. (Richard Donner, director)
First release: 15 Dec 1978

The humor didn’t quite click for me, but I did enjoy other parts including Christopher Reeve, Gene Hackman, the John Williams score, and a well-presented Superman mythos including his first time-travel rebellion against the don’t-mess-with-history edict of Jor-El.

 In times of fear and confusion, the job of informing the public was the responsibility of the Daily Planet, a great metropolitan newspaper whose reputation for clarity and truth had become the symbol for hope in the city of Metropolis. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“A Time-Span to Conjure With” by Ian Watson, Andromeda 3, 1978 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Thirty Love” by Jack C. Haldeman II, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1979 [precognition ]

   “Garbage”
by Ron Goulart
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan 1979

“Garbage”—which I read during the 1978 Christmas when Janet visited me in Washington—was my first exposure to Goulart, who is the Mel Brooks of short science fiction. In the story, Product Investigation Enterprises agent Dan Tockson sends a typevox memo to his boss explaining what went wrong in an investigation into a Florida food with were-ish side effects.

There was no time travel in the food investigation, but at the start of Tockson’s memo, he refers to a previous investigation that took him to 15th century Italy. I found one later Tockson story, “Ask Penny Jupiter,’ but it was timetravelless.

 “Youre angry because I stayed in fifteenth-century Italy so long?”
Im not especially mad,” you answered, growling. “but the Time Travel Overseeing Community wasnt much pleased. You shouldnt have dropped in on Leonardo da Vinci with those tips on aerodynamics.’
 


   “Palely Loitering”
by Christopher Priest
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 1979

At age ten, Mykle jumps off the time-flux bridge at a sharp angle and goes far into the future where he sees a lovely girl named Estyll, and as he grows older, he is drawn to the future and to her over and over again.

 One of these traversed the Channel at an angle of exactly ninety degrees, and to walk across it was no different from crossing any bridge across any ordinary river.
One bridge was built slightly obtuse of the right-angle, and to cross it was to climb the temporal gradient of the flux-field; when one emerged on the other side of the Channel, twenty-four hours had elapsed.
The third bridge was built slightly acute of the right-angle, and to cross to the other side was to walk twenty-four hours into the past. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow existed on the far side of the Flux Channel, and one could walk at will among them.
 




   Happy Days
created by Garry Marshall
First time travel: 6 Mar 1979

Some time after this show jumped the shark, Mork (who made his first appearance in a 1978 Happy Days episode) returns from the 70s to visit Richie and the gang, where they want to know about cars and girls of the future.

 In 1979, . . . both are faster. 


   “Ahead of the Joneses”
by Al Sarrantonio
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1979

Harry Jones’s neighbor has a compulsion to own every modern gadget that’s bigger and better and more whiz-bang than whatever Harry’s got.

 Eat your heart out Harry Jones! 




   “Loob”
by Bob Leman
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1979

Tom Perman remembers his home town differently, but in his actual life, the town is run-down and neither his grandmother nor her elegant house exist—a situation Tom can explain only through changes made to the past by loob, the town idiot; although ironically, it’s only through those changes that Loob himself even exists.

 Their only dreams are of winning prizes on television giveaway shows. 


   “The Dead of Winter”
by Kevin O'Donnell, Jr.
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1979

Four miners, trapped over winter in a mountain cabin, run out of food, but three people in a love triangle show up from the future with a couple of candy bars, a flask of drink, and a fued.

 “Oh, well—” He runs his pasty white hands through hispockets while Cole and the girl do the same. “I have a candy bar or two, I believe,” and he brings them out. “Cole, you have a bottle, dont you?"
The guy with the black hat scowls at him, but brings a flask out of his hip pocket and lays it on the table.
 


interior art by
Vincent Di Fate
   “The Pinch-Hitters”
by George Alec Effinger
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1979

Sandor Courane and four other up-and-coming sf writers are snagged from their hotel at a 1979 convention in New Orleans only to wake up the next morning as five insignificant major league ballplayers in 1954—and the aging Sandor is hitting only .221.

 I felt angry. I wanted to show that kid, but there wasnt anything I could show him, with the possible exception of sentence structure. 


   “The Agent”
by Christopher Priest with David Redd
First publication: Aries 1, 28 Jun 1979

Egon Rettmer—citizen of neutral Silte, but an agent for the Nord-Deutschland in their war against the Masurians—uses time travel for his communiques and, as he realizes on the eve of the N-D invasion, theres the potention to use it for more, maybe even to get a good start with that entrancing visitor, Heidi.

 She was behaving towards him, literally, as if he had been in two places at once . . . as if, this morning, he had met her and told her of the escape plans he had only half started to form a few minutes ago! 




   Kindred
by Octavia E. Butler
First publication: Jul 1979

Dana Franklin, a 26-year-old African-American woman living in modern-day California, finds herself transported back to the antebellum south whenever young redheaded Rufus is in trouble.

 Fact then: Somehow, my travels crossed time as well as distance. Another fact: The boy was the focus of my travels—perhaps the cause of them. 


   “The Merchant of Stratford”
by Frank Ramirez
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 1979

The world’s first time traveler sets out to visit a retired Will Shakespeare, carrying a long a case of books that he hopes will be a unique treat for the immortal bard.

 In my storage case were volumes for his perusal—a concise history of the world through the year 2000, a selection of the greatest poets since the master, selected volumes of Shakespearean criticism, and the massive one-volume Armstead Shakespeare, the definitive Shakespeare, published in 1997. 




   Xanth
by Piers Anthony
First time travel: Jul 1979

Deborah Baker first introduced me to this series of books in 1982, and I read the first nine in the 1980s. The books are set in a pun-infested world in which people have individual magic powers that they must discover. The first time travel that I remember was in the 1979 Castle Roogna where characters could step into a tapestry that took them to the past.

 It was embroidered with scenes from the ancient past of Castle Roogna and its environs, eight hundred years ago. 




   Time after Time
by Nicholas Meyer, Karl Alexander and Steve Hayes (Meyer, director)
First release: 31 Aug 1979

Apart from the hero in The Time Machine movie, this is the earliest that I’ve seen of the H.G.‑Wells-as-time-traveler subgenre. Our hero chases Jack the Ripper into the 20th century.

 Ninety years ago I was a freak; today I am an amateur. 

—Jack the Ripper in the twentieth century


   “Jenning’s Operative Webster”
by J.E. Walters
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1979

For a fee, Jenning’s time-travel agency which will send Webster back through the time stream to inhabit other’s bodies in an attempt to alter some important event such as the loss of a son in Vietnam.

 The fabric of time is a delicate, almost whimsical thing. Our success rate runs at nearly eight-two percent, and within the industry that is an enviable rate. But we just can not guarantee success. 




   Jubilee
by Derek Jarman and Christopher Hobbs (Jarman, director)
First release: Sep 1979

In this early punk movie, John Dee, advisor to Queen Elizabeth I, calls forth an angel who transports the three of them to an anarchistic (but largely unintelligible) 20th century England.

 Now shall one king rise up against another. And there shall be bloodshed throughout the whole world, fighting between the devil, his kingdom, and the kingdom of light. 


   The Alternities, Inc. Stories
by John M. Ford
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1979

I read the first of Ford’s stories in which a small group of men and women, ever hopeful of finding their Homeline, march through a narrow tube where hatches to alternate worlds and alternate times appear every 100 kilometers. I think that most of the Earthlike worlds have a corporation—Alternities, Inc.—which has tried to turn a profit on the tubes.
  1. Mandalay (Oct 1979) Asimov's
  2. Out of Service (Jul 1980) Asimov's
  3. Slowly By, Lorena (Nov 1980) Asimov's
  4. Intersections (26 Oct 1981) Asimov's

 Clever people he worked for.
But not clever enough to preven the Fracture, when Augustan Romans had tumbled into the waters of the Spanish Main and bandannaed urban guerillas shot the hell out of the Sun Kings palace at Verasilles. Not clever enough to point the way to Homeline, except as a hundred-kilometer march from line to line through a hexagonal sewer in Space4.
 

—“Mandalay’




   Roadmarks
by Roger Zelazny
First publication: Oct 1979

As Red Dorakeen tries to avoid assassination, he travels on a highway that links all times via mutable exits that appear every few years.

There are other Zelazny works that drew me in much deeper (try Seven Princes of Amber). Still, Roadmarks has some interesting techniques. For example, Zelazny said that the second of the two storylines, which take place off the Road, was written as separate chapters and then shuffled into no particular order.

 It traverses Time—Time past, Time to come, Time that could have been and Time that might yet be. It goes on forever, so far as I know, and no one knows all of its turnings. 


   “Life Trap”
by Barrington J. Bayley
First publication: The Seed of Life, Nov 1979

Marcus, an aspirant to the highest rank afforded to members of the Arcanum Temple, undergoes an experiment to determine what awaits us after death, and the answer certainly involves time in a macabre manner.

 Although the secret of death has been imparted to the full membership of the Temple, not all have understood its import. 


   “Twist Ending”
by Barry B. Longyear
First publication: Asimov's Science Fiction, Nov 1979

An intelligent Dromaeosaurus named GerG (or maybe just an actor playing GerG in a story, it’s hard to tell), prepares to travel 70,000,000 years into the future in order to pave the way for all the soon-to-be-extinct dinosaurs to escape.

 There exists but one node of time/future open within the range of our frames. You must go there and prepare the way for our exodus. Else, the supernova shall extinguish us all. 




   Fangface
produced by Jerry Eisenberg
First time travel: 3 Nov 1979

Sherman Fangsworth, a cross between Looney Tunes’ Tasmanian Devil and a teen werewolf, had at least one adventure in time when he and his buddies were accidentally transported back to the 18th century by a modern-day pirate (“A Time-Machine Trip to the Pirate’s Ship”).

 After my time machine warms up, well be transported to the deck of the Silver Swan, the Spanish fleet’s most prized treasure ship. And after we pirate her valuable cargo, Ill be the riches man in the world—ha ha ha ha ha! 


   “Closing the Timelid”
by Orson Scott Card
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1979

Centuries in the future, Orion throws an illicit party in which the partygoers get to experience complete death in the past.

 Ah, agony in a tearing that made him feel, for the first time, every particle of his body as it screamed in pain. 


   “Written in Sand”
by Robert Chilson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 1979

Paul Enias travels from 21st century Egypt back to the third century where he becomes Pausanias, falls in love with the slave Taia, and takes advice from Appolonius about which of 750,000 available books to bury in clay jars for future Egyptians to discover.

 Odd that the book-man should shrug off the value of books, but Pausanias had too much to do to ponder it, overseeing the copying, the shipping of the books up the Nile, the reorganization of his new estate, and of course there was taia, then a new—bride. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Time Shards” by Gregory Benford, Universe Anthology #9, 1979 [recordings from the past ]

“Back to Byzantium” by Mark J. McGarry, Asimov’s, Feb 1979 [ancestral memory ]

Dragonriders of Pern #6 (Harper Hall #3): Dragondrums by Anne McCaffrey, Mar 1979 [no time travel ]

“Illusions” by Tony Sarowitz and Paul David Novitski, Asimov’s, Jun 1979 [just trust me: ]

“The Thaw” by Tanith Lee, Asimov’s, Jun 1979 [long sleep ]



   Barney Miller
created by Danny Arnold and Theodore J. Flicker
First time travel: “The Child Stealers,” 24 Jan 1980

In the sixth season, one episode of the show had a man named Mr. Boyer who claimed to be a time traveler from the future. The show never settled whether he was an actual time traveler or merely a candidate for Bellevue Hospital’s psych ward, but consider this: Just how else did he get on top of the Washington Arch> And wasn’t he dead on about the price of gold which crashed from an all-time high of over $2000 per troy ounce on the day of the show’s airing to about $350 over the next two decades. So even if Mr. Boyer was not a time traveler, he saved Sgt. Harris a bundle of money. The precint also got Boyer`'s thoughts on the price of Zinc, the future of gay rights, and the Denver Broncos.

 I had no intentionof jumping, you know. The only reason I was up there is my coordinates were off. 






Three collections of the puzzles were published in the 1980s.
   Martin Gardner’s SF Puzzles
by Martin Gardner
First time travel puzzle: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 1980

Growing up, I read every Martin Gardner science book that I could lay my hands on. Janet even claims that I ignored her on our honeymoon in order to read Gardner’s Relativity for the Million (which is absolutely not true—it was The Ambidextrous Universe). Gardner was a colleague and friend of Asimov’s, which led to a series of sf puzzle stories beginning in the first issue of IASFM and continuing through November of 1986. There was a mention of tachyons in the Mar/Apr 1978 puzzle (“The Third Dr. Moreau”), and the May 1979 puzzle (“How Bagson Bagged a Board Game”) had a device to view the past, but the first actual time travel didn’t occur until February of 1980, quickly followed by another in July 1980 (which coincidentally was the month of the disputed honeymoon).
  1. Professor Cracker’s Antitelephone (Feb 1980) reverse-time phone
  2. The Backward Banana (Jul 1980) fruit travels in time
  3. The Queer Story of Gardner’s Magazine (Aug 1980) magazine from 2556
  4. Parallel Pasts (26 Oct 1981) to the past in a parallel world

 Somewhere in the text is a block of letters which taken forward spell the last name of a top science fiction author who has written about time travel. 

—“The Backward Banana”




Sadly, Galactica 1980 had neither Laurette Spang . . .

nor Jane Seymour

   Galatica 1980
created by Glen A. Larson
First time travel: 10 Feb 1980

I eagarly awaited the reboot of Battlestar Galactica in 1980, shortly before I left to join my soon-to-be wife in England. Sadly, the reboot was a disappointment: poor plots, poor characters, the same few seconds of special effects and explosions endlessly repeated—and not even Cassiopeia (Laurette Spang, whom I was in love with in 1978) or Serina (Jane Seymour, whom I am in love with now).

However, I later discovered one redeeming feature: Time travel in Part Three of the 1980 Galactica pilot show, when the warriers follow an evil scientist back to 1944 and foil his plot to give modern technology to the Nazis. I think this was the only hint of time travel in the Galactica franchise, although the same future wife whom I went to meet in 1980 now tells me that this bit of time travel may have planted a seed in writer Donald P. Bellisario for his later series, Quantum Leap.

 The great ship Galactica, majestic and loving, strong and protecting, our home for these many years we endured the wilderness of space. And now we near the end of our journey. Scouts and electronic surveillance confirm that we have reached our haven, that planet which is home to our ancestor brothers. Too many of our sons and daughters did not survive to share the fulfillment of our dream. We can only take comfort and find strength in that they did not die in vain. We have at last found Earth. 




   Thrice Upon a Time
by James P. Hogan
First publication: Mar 1980

In answer to his least favorite question, James Hogan explained (in the Jan 2006 Analog) that the idea for this novel came from an all night conversation with Charles Sheffield about the classic time-travel paradox of what happens if you send something back in time and the arrival of that thing is the very cause of you not sending said thing back in time. Much of the novel is a similar conversation between physicist Murdoch Ross, his friend Lee, and Murdoch’s Nobel Prize winning grandfather Charles who has invented a way to send messages through time.

 Suppose your grandfathers right. What happens to free will? If you can send information backward through time, you can tell me what I did even before I get around to doing it. So suppose I choose not to? 


   “A Touch of Petulance”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Dark Forces, Aug 1980

On his way home on the train, Jonathan Hughes meets Jonathan Hughes + 20 years and receives a warning that his marriage to a lovely young bride will end in murder.

 Me, thought the young man. Why, that old man is . . . me. 




   The Final Countdown
by Thomas Hunter, Peter Powell, David Ambrose, et. al. (Peter Vincent Douglas, director)
First release: 1 Aug 1980

Observer Warren Lasky is aboard the U.S.S. Nimitz when a storm takes her back to World War II, and then they are returned to the present before they can do anything vaguely cool.

 Today is December 7, 1941. Im sure we are all aware of the significance of this date in this place in history. We are going to fight a battle that was lost before most of you were born. This time, with Gods help, its going to be different. . . . Good Luck. 






   The Muppet Show
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 5 Aug 1980

The most excellent Muppet Show, its successor Muppets Tonight, the short Muppet Movie Mania episodes, and the online From the Balcony couldn't totally ignore time travel.
  1. Chris Langham (5 Aug 1980) working on a time travel aparatus
  2. Michelle Pfeiffer, (8 Mar 1996) Dr. Honeydew bippie time manipulation
  3. The Kerminator (1999) The title says it all.
  4. From the Balcony #27, (Jun 2006) Superman reverses time

 Aparatus travel time a its. Moment the at on working Im what is this. Hello! 

—Guest host Chris Langham


   “Appointment on the Barge”
by Jack Ritchie
First publication: Microcosmic Tales, Sep 1980

After Professor Bertoldt delivers a speech about his theories on how to send a person back to an earlier incarnation, he gets two visitors wanting to go back in time because they claim to be Cleopatra and Anthony.

 I have hesitated to use a human until I can be positive that no psychic harm will result to my subject. However, I do believe that last week I did succeed in sending a chimpanzee back several generations. How far back, I can't be certain. We had a bit of difficulty in communication. 


German edition of Microcosmic Tales   “Murder in the Nth Degree”
by R.A. Montana
First publication: Microcosmic Tales, Sep 1980

An insurance agent from Cleveland is selected as the representative of Earth in a galactic trial for multiple crimes against life, but it’s not until the verdict that you’ll see the time travel angle.

 Representative? Im an insurance agent from Cleveland, Ohio! I got a wife and three kids and about the worst thing Ive ever done was voting Republican in the last election. How can I be a representative? 


1992 paperback edition   “Package Deal”
by Donald Franson
First publication: Microcosmic Tales, Sep 1980

Vernon Lewis has a theoretical idea for a time machine, but no money to build it, so he hatches a plan to send himself various money-making artifacts from the future and use the money to build the machine that will send the items back—and one day, in the afternoon mail, the package arrives.

 He ripped the tape off, unwrapped the brown paper. There it was—an almanac. 




   Cosmos: A Personal Journey
hosted by Carl Sagan
First publication: 28 Sep 1980

Carl Sagan’s original 13-part PBS series introduced us to the Ship of the Imagination. Although it was used only in the first episode, each of the other episodes also took us on a journey through space and time.

 Were going to explore the Cosmos in a ship of the imagination, unfetered by ordinary limits on speed and size, drawn by the music of cosmic harmonies: It can take us anywhere in space and time. 




   The Number of the Beast
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Oct 1980

Semi-mad scientist Jake Burroughs, his beautiful daughter Deety, her strong love interest Zeb Carter, and Hilda Corners (“Aunt Hilda” if you prefer) use Gay Deceiver to visit many time periods in many universes (including that of Lazurus Long), soon realizing the true nature of the world as multiperson pantheistic solipsism.

 Sharpie, you have just invented multiperson pantheistic solipsism. I didnt think that was mathematically possible. 


   “Prairie Sun”
by Edward Bryant
First publication: Omni, Oct 1980

On the Oregon trail west of Laramie in 1850, 13-year-old Micah Taverner asks two scavenger men from the future to cure his sister Annie from the smallpox.

Janet and I heard this read by James Whiteman in 2004 at a series of dramatic readings called Colorado Homegrown Tales. The other stories at the February session were “Hungry” by Steve Rasnic Tem, “The Dream of Houses” by Wil McCarthy, and my own “Childrey Green” read by Debbie Knapp.

 The road was lined with all manner of belongings thrown away by the exhausted, overburdened men and women barely halfway along their arduous journey. 




   Somewhere in Time
by Richard Matheson (Jeannot Szwarc, director)
First release: 3 Oct 1980

A woman presses a pocketwatch into a man’s hand, beseeching him to come find her in time, so he does.

Wayne Winsett, owner of Time Warp Comics, tells me that this is his favorite time travel movie. I can’t argue with his predilection for Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour.

 Come back to me. 




   “Eight Ball Blues”
by Jack C. Haldeman II
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 1980

A time traveler from the 21st century comes to a Florida bar to talk with pool shark Tucker “Skeeter” Moore about his choices in marriage and about saving the world.

 Now wait a minute! I married—er, Im going to marry—Betty-Ann? 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Travels” by Carter Scholz, Asimov’s, Apr 1980 [no definite time travel ]

“Trans Dimensional Imports” by Sharon N. Farber, Asimov’s, Aug 1980 [alternate timelines ]



   The Saga of Pliocene Exile
by Julian May
First book: 1981

A band of twenty-second century exiles steps through a gate to the Pliocene where they hope to start a new life, but they didn’t expect to find exotic aliens for company.
  1. The Many-Colored Land (1981)
  2. The Golden Torc (1982)
  3. The Nonborn King (1983)
  4. The Adversary (1984)

 “None of the above,” said Aiken Drum. “I choose Exile.” 




   “Death in Vesunna”
by Harry Turtledove and Elaine O’Byrne (as by Eric Iverson and Elaine O’Byrne)
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 19 Jan 1981

Lou Muller and his partner-in-crime Mark Alvarez (a.k.a. Lucius and Marcus) travel back from 2059A.D. to obtain Sophokles’s lost play Aleadai, but when the owner of the rare manuscript won’t part with it, they kill him and take it, counting on the obscurity of the backwater second-century town to stop the Time Patrol from discovering their foul deed. That may be so, but they didn’t count on Gaius Tero, one of the second century’s finest, and the sharp-tongued physician Kleandros.

 Whatever. And as for the Time Patrol, why are we here in the boondocks instead of at the library of Alexandria? Why do we insist on so much privacy when we make our deals? Just so they wont run across us. And they wont. 


   “The Final Days”
by David Langford
First publication: A Spadeful of Spacetime, Feb 1981

During an important presidential election between the slick Harman and the less polished Ferris, scientists detect eyes that are watching Harman from the future, perhaps because he is fated to be such an important political figure.

 The people have this hint of the winning side, as they might from newspaper predictions or opinion polls—but the choice remains theirs, a decisions which we politicians humbly accept. 


   “Graffiti”
by Gary Alexander
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 19 Apr 1981

Seventeen years working as the nighttime janitor in the Winston Building and Harv Blasingame has neer seen the likes of this futuristic graffiti that refuses to be obliterated.

 THE ALLIANCE IS AN IMPOTENT SHAM, IT’S PRINCIPAL EXPORT BEING STUPIDITY AND TREACHERY. 


Some of the stories were collected in this 1985 collection.   The Pshrinks Anonymous Stories
by Janet Asimov (as by J.O. Jeppson)
First time travel: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 13 Apr 1981

I haven’t read all of psychiatrist Janet Asimov’s stories of a lunchclub whose Pshrink members relate to each other stories about various patients, but the two I did read had fantastic case studies involving time travel.
  1. The Hotter Flash (13 Apr 1981) Menopausal time travel in Asimov’s
  2. The Time-Warp Trauma (21 Dec 1981) Central Park time warps in Asimov’s

 Doctors dont know anything. I lived through it, and I know that my hot flashes certainly were hotter. 

—“The Hotter Flash”


   The Cases of Ben Hardy, Time Detective
by Warren Salomon
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 11 May 1981

For me, Salomon’s first story of Ben Hardy, hard-boiled temporal private eye, was about one Delorean shy of having enough boisterous fun that I could completely ignore the inconsistencies in the time-travel model—but even so, I had fun as Ben attempted to restore time to its rightful path for heiress Patricia Wadsworth (and in the process try to figure out the familial relations between himself, Pat, Pat’s parents, the inventor of time travel, and that dastardly lawyer).
  1. Time & Punishment (11 May 1981) first story in Asimov
  2. Time on My Hands (Oct 1982) in Asimov’s
  3. As Time Goes By (Feb 1984) in Asimov’s

 They all say that. “Why is it,” I asked her, “you seem to remember the, ah, original sequence? In a reality change, memories are altered along with everything else. How can you be certain that time has been tampered with?” That question usually ends it right there. 




   Star Trek: The Entropy Effect
by Vonda N. McIntyre
First publication: Jun 1981

Spock and the rest of the crew of the Enterprise transport a time-traveling criminal, Dr. Georges Mordreaux, between planets.

 The effort required to change an event is proportional to the square of its distance in the past. The curve of a power function approaches infinity rather quickly. 




   The Day Time Ended
aka Time Warp, aka Vortex, aka Earth’s Final Fury, aka Black Thunder
by Wayne Schmidt, J. Larry Carroll, David Schmoeller, et.al. (Bud Cardos, director)
First release: 31 Jul 1981

After an hour or so of mundane conversation, a triple supernova, a UFO, a tiny mannikin/alien, and creepy lights, the Williams family and their horses are transported through a time-space warp to an unknown time for the other twenty minutes of the movie. (The creepy lights stick around, too.) Its hard to tell for sure, but I think theyre going to live out their lives amongst the weird lights and crystal structures of this new time. Sadly, I never did see the giant lizard.

 Steve, you know what this is, dontcha? Its a time-space warp. 


   “Dinosaur Weather”
by Dona Vaughn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 3 Aug 1981

The real reason for the extinction of the dinosaurs becomes apparent, a reason that makes a certain restaurant cat very happy and very fat.

 I frowned and made a mental note to buy an umbrella. 


   “On the Nature of Time”
by Barry N. Malzberg and Bill Pronzini
First publication: Amazing, Sep 1981

A boy grows up hating his father; hence, when he invents a time machine, he uses it to go back and kill his father before his own conception.

 When I was sixteen I wished that the dream of my fathers murder had not been a dream at all. 




   Superbook
by Akiyoshi Sakai
First episode: 1 Oct 1981

Young Chris Peeper finds a magic Bible that transports him, his friend Joy, and his robot Gizmo back to Old Testament happenings. The first run was anime, followed by a second run of 3-D CGI animation.

 ♫ Chris and Joy and everyone were having lots of fun. Superbook fell off the shelf: look what theyve done. When it hit the computer, oh, they were surprised. Superbook got programmed in; now its computerized.♫  




   Ulysses 31
created by Jean Chalopin and Nina WOlmark
First time travel: 31 Oct 1981

When a future Ulysses angers the gods, he and his children are exiled to travel space forever. Time travel occurs in the ninth episode, when they enter the domain of Chronos, and in a later episode where they head back to meet the original Ulysses.

 Time! I must turn it back! This must work! 




   Time Bandits
by Terry Gilliam and Michael Palin (Gilliam director)
First release: 6 Nov 1981

A boy’s bedroom is invaded by six midgets who have stolen The Almighty One’s map which then leads the whole lot of them on adventures through time.

 Is it all ready? Right. Come on then. Back to creation. We mustnt waste any more time. Theyll think Ive lost control again and put it all down to evolution. 


   “End Game”
by Brian Aldiss
First publication: Asimov`'s Science Fiction, 21 Dec 1981

Thing wonderous: a review that is palindromic. Yes, palindromic! Is that review a wonderous thing?

 Thunder. Distant sound.
Questions posed shake universes like constructs , like universes, shake posed questions, sound distant thunder.
 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“These Stones Will Remember” by Reginald Bretnor, Asimov’s, 16 Feb 1981 [viewing the past ]

“The Jaunt” by Stephen King, Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone, Jun 1981 [differing time rates ]

“The Gernsback Continuum” by William Gibson, Universe 11, Jun 1981 [alternate timelines ]

“Liros: A Tale of the Quintana Roo” by James Tiptree, Jr., Asimov’s, 28 Sep 1981 [no definite time travel ]
aka “What Came Ashore at Lirios”

“The Pusher” by John Varley, F&SF, Oct 1981 [time dilation ]

   Bound in Time
by D.F. Jones
First publication: 1982

Mark Elver, a terminally ill doctor, agress to be the first time traveler with a destination some four centuries in the future. His first contact upon arrival is with a pair of children, but the world has more beyond them.

 The birthplace of time-travel, a collection of huts huddled together well away from the main campus, did not look impressive. A cheap sign nailed to the paint-hungry door stated ‘Dept., of Physics—Project Four’, below that a thumb-tacked notice, the lettering faded added a little more information: ‘Go away. If you must, ring bell.’ 


   “Fish Night”
by Joe Lansdale
First publication: Specter!, 1982

Rather more frequently than I’d like, it’s hard to tell whether a story involves time travel or not. This could just be a ghost fish story, but there are some indications that the old toothless door-to-door salesman might be traveling back to the time of the early fish.

 Millions and millions of years ago this desert was sea bottom. Maybe even the birthplace of man. Who knows? 




   “The Winds of Change”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Speculations: 17 Stories . . ., 1982

Jonas Dinsmore is not half the physicist as his colleagues, the politically astute Adams and the brilliant Muller, but in their presence, he claims to have figured out how to interpret Muller’s Grand Unified Theory to allow time travel.

 Time-travel, in the sense of going backward to change reality, is not only technologically impossible now, but it is theoretically impossible altogether. 




  Humboldt Series #2
The Humboldt Effect
by Delia Huddy
First publication: Jan 1982

Years ago, in Time Piper, Luke discovered that Tom Humboldt, the boss of his summer research project, had a time machine. Now Luke is on a submarine version of the machine. One crew member has disappeared overboard, and the time machine has grabbed a noted Biblical man.

  




   Miss Switch to the Rescue
created by Barbara Brooks Wallace
First aired: 16 Jan 1982

After the Miss Switch children’s book and cartoon, there was a longer ABC Weekend Special (“Miss Switch to the Rescue”) where a pirate whos been stuck in a bottle for centuries takes one of Miss Switchs students (Amelia) back to his time, and the teacher-cum-witch and another student (Rupert) go back to rescue her.

 Kinda mysterious, aint it, Amelia. 


   “Clap Hands and Sing”
by Orson Scott Card
First publication: The Best of Omni Science Fiction 3, Feb 1982

Ancient Charlie sees a momentary vision of young Rachel, barely into her teens, and the moment with her that was never to be.

I’ve read other Card stories where he portrays the dark side of a character in realistic and frightening form that I could deal with, but for me, the seeming comfort that the character gets at the end is more disturbing than anything else Card has written.

 He almost stops himself. Few things are left in his private catalog of sin, but surely this is one. He looks into himself and tries to find the will to resist his own desire solely because its fulfillment will hurt another person. He is out of practice—so far out of practice that he keeps losing track of the reason for resisting. 


The story was reprinted in this 1982 collection.

   “The Thousand Cuts”
by Ian Watson
First publication: The Best of Omni Science Fiction 3, Feb 1982

Alison, Don, and Hugh have philosophical discussions on what it means when the entire world skips two or three days at a time and then picks up at some random moment in the future. In the blackout period, amazing progress is made in arms control and hostage negotiations. Time travel? Maybe not, but certainly a fun read with some echos of Sturgeon’s “Yesterday Was Monday.”

 God has decided to cut reality and re-edit it. 






   The Oxford Time-Traveling Historians
by Connie Willis
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 15 Feb 1982

In the first short story of the series, an Oxford graduate student travels back to the World War II bombing of St. Paul’s for his history practicum. This launched a series of novels, the first of which has Kivrin Engle being sent to 14th century England, but when she arrives, she can’t remember where and when her pickup will be. The second book incorporated more comedy, and the last two returned to World War II.
  1. “Fire Watch” (15 Feb 1982) Asimovs
  2. The Doomsday Book (1992) Kivrin Engle to 1320 Oxford
  3. To Say Nothing of the Dog (1998)    Ned Henry to 1888 Oxford
  4. Blackout (2010) Michael, Polly and Merope to WW II England
  5. All Clear (2010) continuation of Blackout

 “But Im not ready,” Id said. “Look, it too me four years to get ready to travel with St Paul. St Paul. Not St Pauls. You cant expect me to get ready for London in the Blitz in two days.” 


   “Park Your Car on Baychester Road Tonight”
by Bill Bickel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, 15 Mar 2015

In the process of parking his car on a Wednesday night—always a difficult proposition—a man is approached by a time traveler who offers him two gold bars if he’s park in a No Parking zone.

 My friend Selka and I have devised a game in which we carefully alter the stream of time, to cause some subtle change in our own time period. This particular round, for example, concerns itself with the location of our citys capitol building. 


   “Amy, at the Bottom of the Stairs”
by John M. Ford
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1982

Warnke, a time traveler who has visited the moment of a past death more than once, comes to the house of Lady Amy Dudley née Robsart) on the eve that she is fated to fall down the stairs in an accident that her husband, Robert Dudley (an accused but reprieved conspirator in the taking of the English throne by Jane Grey) will be suspected of arranging so that he would be free to marry Elizabeth I.

 Im not a seer. Im a . . . traveler. From one time to another. Do you understand? I know when youll die, and where, and how, because its all written down in a history book. 


   The Aquila Trilogy
by S.P. Somtow (aka Somtow P. Sucharitkul)
First time travel: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1982

In an alternate second century where Romans rule a swathe of North America as far as the Dakotas, Titus Papinianus meets the Lakota chief Aquila who first teaches him a new way to fight the hoards from Asia and then leads him on adventures (including the time-traveling Central Dimension Patrol Authority) from modern-day Mexico to China.
  1. 1. “Aquila the God’ (Jan 1982) Asimov’s
  2. 1. “Aquila’ (Jan 1982) Asimov’s
  3. 2. “Aquila the God’ (Apr 1982) Asimov’s
  4. 3. “Aquila Meets Bigfoot’ (Jan 1983) Amazing
  5. 4. “Aquila: The Final Conflict’ (May 1983) Amazing
  6. 5. The Aquilad (Dec 1983) combines 1-4
  7. 6. Aquila and the Iron Horse (May 1988) Volume II
  8. 7. Aquila and the Sphinx (Dec 1988) Volume III

 I understood very little of what he was saying, but he went on to say that he was from the far future and that they had come in search of certain criminals who had to be brought to trial, who were guilty of attempting to tamper with the past . . . . 


   “Valhalla”
by Gregory Benford
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Apr 1982

A nameless traveler from the future appears in Hitler’s bunker moments before the Führer’s suicide. Hitler interprets the man as a Valkyrie, come to escort him to a higher place, but the man (who is made up to look exactly like Hitler) has plans that don’t exactly include a Nordic heaven in Hitler’s future.

 Immortality, Führer! That is what I offer. I have come to you from the future! 




   The Flying House
directed by Masakazu Higuchi and Mineo Fuji
First episode: 5 Apr 1982

While playing in the woods, Justin Casey and his pals Angie and Corkey stumble upon a house owned by Professor Humphrey Bumble and his robot Solar Ion, whereupon the professor reveals that the house is a time machine and the entire gang visits various Biblical happenings from the New Testament.

 ♫ We were having fun, playing hide-and-seek, then a summer storm appeared. Corkey got afraid, when it started to rain, then we came upon a house—should we go insiiiiide? ♫  


   “All the Time in the World”
by Daniel Keyes Moran
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1982

Seven centuries after the Big Crunch atomic war, one of the clan of Huntresses learns to travel back in time after talking with aliens and perhaps sensing the man who would be negative entropy.

 Here we have a time traveller, and her name is Jalian. Yes, Jalian dArsennette, except that there have been some changes. 


   “Azimuth 1,2,3...”
by Damon Knight
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1982

Shortly after genius Azimuth Backfiler (yes, that’s his real name) finds a way to travel back in time, Azimuth 2 appears and hands him next week’s newspaper causing some sort of feedback that create Azimuth 3, Azimuth 4, . . .

 Therefore, he was not surprised to see himself emerge from the chamber, wearing this very suit, a moment after he had formed the decision. 


The story also appeared in this 1989 collection of time-travel fiction taken from Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine.   “The Comedian”
by Tim Sullivan (as by Timothy Robert Sullivan)
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1982

A projected vision from the future takes on the forms of various 20th century comedians from Charley Chaplin to Don Rickles, and he’s also making wildlife manager Chris Reilly kidnap children.

 The comedian looked just like a living, breathing, three-dimensional human being, the reincarnation of Lenny Bruce, come to see the unhappy world end. 




   Voyagers!
created by James D. Parriott
First episode: 3 Oct 1982

Bright, young orphan Jeffrey and ladies’ man Phineas Bogg leap from one moment in history to another, righting those moments that have gone wrong in this Quantam Leap progenitor.

 This isnt 1942. Wheres Columbus, kid? 


   “Good Golly, Miss Molly”
by Steven Bryan Bieler
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1982

When Dr. Demented Physicist Particle Breakdown bets his entire life savings on a horse race and the campus’s best handicapper picks Miss Molly instead, the good Dr. Breakdown has no choice but to further handicap Miss Molly.

 Locating his car, Dr. Breakdown extracted from the trunk a Phillips-head screwdriver, a toothbrush, his spare tire, five felt pens, and a plumbers helper. With these materials he constructed a duplicate of the time machine in the university physics lab. 




   The Fonz and the Happy Days Gang
narrated by Wolfman Jack
First publication: 8 Nov 1982

Before Marty McFly went to the 50s, this 50s gang traveled through time using a time machine brought to them by a future chick name o’ Cupcake, all in 24 episodes where they desperately try to get back to 1957 Milwaukee.

 Oh, now the gang got zapped into that time machine, and theyre, like, travelin through time. My, my, they do not dig where that machine is goin, but they sure hope to get back to 1957 Milwaukee! 


   “Coming Back”
by Damien Broderick
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 1982

Physics-lab flunkie Eddie Rostow knows that the glory that his professor is claiming over localized time-reversal should rightly be Eddie’s own; and then, there’s Jennifer who let him have his way with her one night and now ignores him. So what, forsooth, will he do when the time contraption throws him into a 34-minute time loop?

 Im not trapped. I thought I was a prisoner, but Im the first man in history to be genuinely liberated. Set free from consequence. Do it. If you dont like the results, scrub it on the next cycle and try again. 




   Timerider: The Adventure of Lyle Swann
by Michael Nesmith (William Dear, director)
First release: 11 Dec 1982

Now that I know that one of the Monkees wrote this time-travel yarn (motorcycle racer goes back to the old west), the universe begins to make sense.

 You shot it. What a bunch of dumb sons of bitches. You shot it—a machine, you butt-heads! 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
Port Eternity by C.J. Cherryh, 1982 [parallel universe ]
aka Involutions

Voyage from Yesteryear by James P. Hogan, Apr 1982 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Lazarus Rising” by Gregory Benford, Asimov’s, Jul 1982 [long sleep ]

“The Boy Who Waterskied to Forever” by James Tiptree, Jr., F&SF, Oct 1982 [no definite time travel ]

“Dr. Time” by Sharon N. Farber, et. al., Asimov’s, Oct 1982 [despite title, no time travel ]

1983 Baronet/Playmore edition

four later editions

   Illustrated Classics Edition:
The Time Machine

aka Great Illustrated Classics: The Time Machine
adapted by Shirley Bogart (story) and Brendan Lynch (art)
First publication: 1983

If you are a misguided completist, you may find yourself drawn to reading the new Chapter 13 in Bogart’s adaptation in which the traveller finds himself in an authoritarian 22nd century populated by 1950s cape-wearing, B-movie characters. Do so if you must, but try to resist the urge to read any of the rest of Bogart’s adaptation for pre-teens, and whatever else you do, dont let the book fall into the hands of your eight-to-twelve-year-old.

The first edition was released in 1983, possibly in multiple formats, although I’ve never spotted what I believe was the first edition published by Waldman Publishing in 1983; multiple editions, including a Chinese translation, have appeared since.

 A figure in a silver cape and tights, with gloves to match, was saying, “Thats enough Apathy-Gas, Kolar. Theres only one passenger.’ 

—from the new Chapter 13: The Golden Age of Science


   A Rebel in Time
by Harry Harrison
First publication: Feb 1983

Lt. Troy Harmon, a black army sergeant, follows Colonel McCulloch back to 1859 to prevent the colonel from giving modern-day technology to the South.

 “Then you are also telling me that down there among all that stuff—that you have built a time machine?”
“Well, I think . . .” She smiled brightly. “Why, yes, I suppose that we have.”
 


   “Sweet Song of Death”
by Stephen Kimmel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 1983

Dave, an old man on the verge of dying, partakes in a time travel experiment, hoping to save his long-ago wife and young daughter from a car accident even though nobody has ever managed to change past events before.

 If our hypothesis is correct and the Corvini-Langstrum effect is a form of time travel . . . then you may be able to change the circumstances and prevent her death. 


   “As Time Goes By”
by Tanith Lee
First publication: Chrysalis 10, Apr 1983

The narrator tells of a time travel paradox where a girl of fifteen meets Day Curtis who has come from a disaster that’s still another sixteen years in the future—and she returns to the scene years later to warn him.

 Let me prompt you. Youre dead, Curtis. Or you will be. 


   “Short Timer”
by John Morressy
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1983

After the Traveller’s miniature time machine makes its way back to Lilliput and the Emperor scares himself witless by a short trip forward in time, Pilibosh (a court carpenter) accidentally takes it out for a longer spin, finding H.G. Wells and Irish leprechauns along the way.

 The story does not begin with Pilibosh. In a bewildering cosmological sense it does not begin at all, nor does it end. But that is a matter best left to the philosophers. 




   Millennium
by John Varley
First publication: Jun 1983

When the snatchers leave two stun guns in the 20th century, we see the story from the viewpoints of Louise Baltimore (Mandy’s boss) and Bill Smith (head of an NTSB investigation, no relation to Woodrow “Bill” Smith so far as I know).

 The crew had to stun just about everybody. The only bright spot was the number wed managed to shuffle through during the thinning phase. The rest would have to go through on our backs. 


   “Needle in a Timestack”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Playboy, Jun 1983

Nick Mikklesen and his wife Janine know that Janine’s ex-husband is out to break up their marriage by altering the past.

 In the old days, when time was just a linear flow from then to now, did anyone get bored with all that stability? For better or for worse it was different now. You go to bed a Dartmouth man and wake up Columbia, never the wiser. You board a plane that blows up over Cyprus, but then your insurance agent goes back and gets you to miss the flight. 


   “Sunlight”
by Paul E. Holt
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1983

A reporter with the Time Warp Review is doing a story on a former mobster who doesn’t want to leave his condemned building. But what does he want? Fortunately, the reporter and his warpfotographer have a way to see what’s in the mobster’s future—or maybe it’s more than that.

 I did a lotta things in my life that I ought notta. 




   Twilight Zone: The Movie
by John Landis, et. al. (Landis, et. al, directors)
First release: 28 Jun 1983

The first of the Twilight Zone revivals collected rewrites of three of the original show’s stories with one new story, “Time Out” by John Landis, in which disgruntled bigot Bill Connor finds himself as a Jew in World War II German occupied Europe, a black man facing the clan in early 20th century America, and a man in a Vietnamese jungle during the Second Indochina War.

 Ray, help! Larry! It’s me! 




   “Homefaring”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Phantasia Press, Jul 1983; and in Amazing, Nov 1983

A grand experiment takes McCulloch into the mind and body of an intelligent creature—an intelligent giant lobster—of the far future.

 “It is not painful to have a McCulloch within one,” his host was explaining. “It came upon me at molting time, and that gave me a moment of difficulty, molting being what it is. But it was only a moment. After that my only concern was for the McCullochs comfort.” 


   “Stolen Moments”
by Brad Strickland
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1983

A peculiar man repeatedly delays a small-town lawyer from taking what seems to be a most important phone call.

 It falls our task to correct untoward trends in history, eliminating unhappy catastrophe. 




   He-Man and the Masters of the Universe
created by Roger Sweet
First time travel: 12 Sep 1983

He-Man and his mighty battle cat possess fabulous super-powers in order to defend Castle Greyskull against the sometimes time-traveling Skeletor (and also to sell Mattel action figures).

 Time is delicate, He-Man; do your job swiftly. 


   “From Time to Time”
by Bruce Stanley Burdick
First publication: Analog, Oct 1983

With the universe nearing its end, Jinma Lor travels to an outpost to converse with antimatter beings whose sense of time is reversed from his own.

 It is possible that the direction in which the associated souls are traveling is always the orientation for which matter becomes more disorganized. 


   “Full Chicken Richness”
by Avram Davidson
First publication: Last Wave, Oct 1983

Every now and then, I’ll be reading a story, not really sure whether it’s meant to be sf or not, but realizing that it has a pleasant sfnal tone—and then, voila!, there’s time travel. Davidson’s story is a piece that lives on the edge between real and surreal, ostensibly telling the story of Fred Hopkins, an artist who puts old buildings on canvas and takes a late morning breakfast at La Bunne Burger.

 He read on: Ingredients: Water, Other Poultry and Poultry Parts, Dehydrated Vegetables, Chickens and Chicken Parts, seasoning . . . the list dribbled off into the usual list of chemicals. 




  Dragonriders of Pern #7
Moreta: Dragonlady of Pern
by Anne McCaffrey
First publication: Oct 1983

Moreta, the new weyrleader at Fort Weyr, leads the effort to save Pern from a deadly infection.

As you know, dragons can travel between times as well as places. In this story, K’lon stumble upon the chronoability of his dragon, using it to spend more time with his love A’murry; later, Moreta hatches a plan to bring more of the needed needlethorn from the future.

 But my dear boy, youve been taking a dreadful risking timing it. You could meet yourself coming and going— 


General Robert E. Lee from the Oct 1983 Analog   “Quarks at Appomattox”
by Charles L. Harness
First publication: Analog, Oct 1983

Colonel von Mainz travels back from the 21st century to 1865 Appomattox with weapons that can make the South win the war and thereby keep America divided, allowing Germany to win the wars of the 20th century.

This is one of the stories that I read in my dad’s Analogs at the end of my tricycle trip to Seattle.

 I left the American sector of Berlin this morning, April 8, in the year two thousand five and sixty, almost exactly two hundred years in your future. I am indeed a colonel, but not in the Prussian army. I am a colonel in the Neues Schutz-Staffeln—the NSS—an underground paramilitary organization devoted to reuniting West and East Germany. 




   The Anubis Gates
by Tim Powers
First publication: Dec 1983

A modern-day millionaire finds time-gates left by ancient Egyptian gods, which results in a lifetime of adventure for Professor Brendan Doyle as he attempts to stop various Egyptian god worshipers from changing the past. Oh yes: he’d also like to avoid his own fated death if possible.

 You know our gods are gone. They reside now in the Tuaut, the underworld, the gates of which have been held shut for eighteen centuries by some pressure I do not understand but which I am sure is linked with Christianity. Anubis is the god of that world and the gates, but has no longer any form in which to appear here. 


   “Time Bride”
by Gardner Dozois and Jack Dann
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 1983

Shortly after turning eight, Marcy Meisner loses her childhood to an everpresent voice from the future who (so he assures Marcy’s parents) wants to marry Marcy when she grows up and has only Marcy’s best interests at heart.

 Please let me explain, Mr. Meisner. I dont want to marry Marcy now. I want to marry her in the future, ten years from now, when shes eighteen. That is, I believe, an acceptable age. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Beyond the Dead Reef” by James Tiptree, Jr., F&SF, Jan 1983 [no definite time travel ]

“Concerto in B Demolished” by Al Sirois, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan 1983 [clones ]

“After-Images” by Malcolm Edwards, Interzone, Spring 1983 [differing time rates ]

The Crucible of Time by John Brunner, Sep 1983 [despite title, no time travel ]
aka The Fire Is Lit, aka “Fusing and Refusing” (excerpts)



   Caballo de Troya Series
English title: The Trojan Horse Series (translated from spanish)
by Juan José Benítez
First book: 1984

L.S. Thomas kindly sent me a copy of her English translation of the first of nine books about time travelers who visit the life of Christ. Another translation was written by Margaret Sayers Peden.

 The computer display read 23 hours, 3 minutes and 22 seconds on Thursday March 30 of the year 30. We had “traveled back” a total of 17,019,289 hours. 




   Norby Books
by Janet and Isaac Asimov
First time travel: 1984

In the second book of this children’s series (Norby’s Other Secret, 1984), the precocious robot reveals his time-travel powers to his pal Jeff; their mishaps in time continue in at least three later books (Norby and the Queen’s Necklace, Norby Finds a Villian, and Norby and Yobo’s Great Adventure).



   “The Toynbee Convector”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Playboy, Jan 1984

You’ll enjoy this story (which was also an episode of Ray Bradbury Theater), but I’ll give away no more beyond the quote below. By the way, if you get the original publication, you’ll also acquire the last nude photo of Marilyn Monroe, although (to my knowledge) she never traveled through time.

 What can I do to save us from ourselves? How to save my friends, my city, my state, my country, the entire world from this obsession with doom? Well, it was in my library late one night that my hand, searching along shelves, touched at last on an old and beloved book by H.G. Wells. His time device called, ghostlike, down the years. I heard! I understood. I truly listened. Then I blueprinted. I built. I traveled . . . 


   “Post Haste”
by Sharon Farber, James P. Killus, Susanna Jacobson and Dave Stout
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 1984

Science fiction writer Buzz Bailey has had several recent ideas for stories, including one about finding parking spaces through time travel, but the problem is that the top market, Prognosto Science Fiction, keeps vehemently rejecting the stories before they’re even written.

 “What the? . . .” He tipped up the envelope. Ashes spilled onto the floor. 


   “Ghost Lecturer”
by Ian Watson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1984

A conceited man brings Lucretius to the present in order to explain to the classical scientist exactly where he was wrong, but it turns out that Lucretius’s classical atomism was brought along with him.

 What;s happening? Ill tell you what’s happening. Those “films” you see flying off surfaces and hitting your eyes—thats how our friend here thought visions worked. And now were seeing it happen, as though its true. 




   The Bunjee Venture
aka The Amazing Bunjee Venture
adapted by Malcolm Marmorstein
First aired: 24 Mar 1984

Karen and Andy’s dad builds a time machine (the last crucial part being their mom’s hair dryer), and the kids travel back to the prehistoric past to find new parents for orphaned Bunjee critter babies.

I like the ABC Weekend and Afternoon Specials. This is the second one that I saw with time travel. It’s based on a book by Stan McMurtry that I haven't yet seen, and there was a follow-on episode, “The Return of the Bunjee” in 1985.

 Ive created the ultimate scientific masterpiece. Ive done the impossible. Ive invented a time machine! 




   “Twilight Time”
by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1984

Travis goes back to 1961 and the dance where he met his now-departed sweetheart, but he also has memories of aliens who quietly took over the world.

 A decade of peace and quiet and short hair was winding down; a time when people knew their place and stayed in it. For ten years nobody had wanted anything but a new car and a bigger TV set. Now all that was about to change. In a little over a year the Cuban missile crisis would send thousands of people into their back yards to dig bomb shelters, and “advisors” would start pouring into Southeast Asia. In another year the president would be dead. 




   The Philadelphia Experiment
adapted by Michael Janover, William Gray, et. al. (Stewart Rafill, director)
First release: 3 Aug 1984

Seaman David Herdeg and his pal are thrown from 1943 to 1984 during a naval experiment gone awry, and in that future, David is the only one who can save a missing town (provided he can dodge enough bullets and perhaps win the heart of the lovely Allison Hayes).

 Navy owes me 40 years back pay. 


   The Mackenzie Stories
by John Gribbin
First story: Analog, Sep 1984

Mackenzie, a researcher and problem solver who must continually justify his existence to his benefactor, is puzzled about why the things he sends back in time never reappear, but then in the first story (“Perpendicular Worlds,” Sep 1984 Analog) he starts thinking about Hawking black holes and Everett parallel worlds, and his work continues in a second story (“Random Variable,” Feb 1986 Analog) (although I prefer Gribbon’s science books).

 There must be as many different ways in which the world could have got into the state it is now as there are different ways in which it can develop into the future. 


   “Christian”
by Ian McDonald
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1984

In his favorite secret spot, a little boy meets Christian who tells the boy how he wanted to be a toymaker but instead had to be a ship pilot because of his special talents to see a bit into the future and the past. Now, Christian waits for the machine that he loved to return for him, and while he waits he builds kites, including one that moves a bit into the future and the past.

 Well, you see, most kites fly in the three dimensions that were familiar with in our world, but some kites flyu in four or even five dimensions and go a little bit outward and a little bit inward into time. 




   The Terminator
by James Cameron and William Wisher, Jr. (Cameron, director)
First release: 26 Oct 1984

Artificially intelligent machines from 2029 send a killer cyborg back to 1984 to kill the mother of John Connor because, in 2029, John will lead the resistance against the machines’ rule.

 Come with me if you want to live. 

—Kyle to Sarah at the Tech-Noir Club


   “Slan Libh”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Nov 1984

When Kevin O Malley’s home-built time machine becomes operable, he uses it to research his Irish ancestors during the potato blight of 1845.

 The past is changeable but self-correcting. Easy to change small things; harder to change big ones. 


   “The Life of Boswell”
by Jerry Oltion
First publication: Analog, Dec 1984

Michael Wagoner doesn't really want to be an English major and write poetry for the rest of his life, but what choice does he have—until the first day of his final semester when he meets a centerfold.

 All innocence, she turned to the middle, opened the gatefold, held it out sideways, then vertically. I dropped the beer when she shouted, “Grandma!” 




   Saturday Night Live
created by Lorne Michaels
First time travel: 1 Dec 1984

We all know that early in her career, Teri Garr hung out with a time-traveling Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock. But who knew that she’d be time traveling again in a 1985 SNL time travel skit? I tried hard to pick my favorite from the bunch that I know of, but that’s an impossible task given that each one is bizaare is a completely orthogonal direction from the others.

Please let me know if you know of other episodes!
  1. A Time Traveler Interrupts Book Beat (1 Dec 1984): Time traveler Ed Begley, Jr., bursts in on an SNL skit because of a pressing need to see a particular young lady. “I’ve been looking for a young lady, Julie Louis-Dreyfus. Have you seen her?”
  2. Time Machine Trivia Game (21 Dec 1985): Teri Garr and Randy Quaid play Trivial Pursuit with Nora Dunn and Jon Lovitz while the family teenager, Anthony Michael Hall, changes the answers with his time machine science project. “Ted Kennedy, Chappaquiddick, eight hundered secreetaries, really sorry.”
  3. Presidential Debate (8 Nov 1988): Tom Hanks hosts Jon Lovitz and Dana Carvey in the 1988 presidential election debate. “I’m glad you asked me that, Sam, because tonight I can reveal something that’s just been declassified. The key to SDI, to the whole concept, is a Time Machine.”
  4. The Tooncinator (16 Nov 1991): Linda Hamilton herself tries to escape the robot cat Tooncinator while Terminator Phil Hartman tries to save SNL. “Not you again! I crushed you, then I melted you! What do I have to do, Cuisinart you?”
  5. Dave Is Always Five Subjects Ago (11 Jan 1992): While dining with Beth Cahill and Mike Myers, Rob Morrow can never seem to think of a quick comeback or relevant remark until the moment has passed. “They probably show ’em The French Connection.”
  6. Deep Thoughts: Time Travel Etiquette (16 Jan 1993): “It’s probably best to avoid eye contact.
  7. The Falconer: Time Travel (20 May 2006): Before he was Frank Underwood, Kevin Spacey traveler through time to meet his earlier self and try to save Donald. The saving plan went awry, but we got to see many more Falconers (though only one Donald and only one Abraham Lincoln). “To the time machine!”
  8. George Washington Returns (12 Feb 2011): Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader may accept Russell Brand as our first president, but will they have the final word? “You will each have sixty seconds to make your case to him. At that point, President Washington will give his expert opinion: We will accept it.”
  9. Statler and Waldorf (19 Nov 2011): While Jason Segel sings with the Muppets, Statler and Waldorf comment from the peanut gallery. “I hope Florence brought a time machine so we can go back to before we heard that song!”
  10. Best Friends (10 Dec 2011): An odd assortment of best friends, including Abraham Lincoln and Marilyn Monroe, celebrate the holiday season. ♫Let’s turn it on and meet Abraham Lincoln.♫

 Bobby, are you altering human destiny after your father told you not to? 


   “Hindsight”
by Harry Turtledove (as by Eric G. Iverson)
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1984

When 1950’s science fiction writer Mark Gordian has a flurry of great stories (“Watergate,” “Houston, We've Got a Problem,” “Neutron Star,” and the ultimate time-travel yarn, “All You Zombies”), Pete Lundquist has nothing but admiration, until Gordian comes out with a story that Pete himself has been outlining.

 “Oh, my God! Tet Offensive!” McGregor stared from one of them to the other. “Youre not telling me that ones based on fact?” 



Romance Time Travel of 1984

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
Yesterday 1: Journey to Yesterday by June Lund Shiplett

Yesterday 2: Return to Yesterday by June Lund Shiplett




No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Writing Time” by Isaac Asimov, Asimov’s Science Fiction, July 1984 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Mrs. Todd’s Shortcut” by Stephen King, Redbook, May 1984 [4D spacial topology ]

“Realtime” by Gladys Prebehalla and Daniel Keys Moran, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1984 [despite title, no time travel ]

Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai by W.D. Richter and Neil Canton, 15 Aug 1984 [oscillation overthruster ≠ flux capacitor ]

Voltron by World Events Productions, 10 Sep 1984 [no definite time travel ]

   “Through Road No Wither”
by Greg Bear
First publication: Far Frontirs, Jan 1985

At a writers’ conference in Manhattan, KS, I was fortunate enough to sit beside the very kind and knowledgeable Greg Bear at the conference dinner, and I’ve enjoyed every piece of his fiction that I’ve read—but I simply didn’t understand this story any better than I understood its title. The story is set in an alternate version of 1984 where Hitler was victorious, and two lost SS officers come across a hag who (I think) sends them back in time.

 Your cities in flame, your women and children shriveling to black dolls in the heat of their burning homes. The death camps found and you stand accused of hideous crimes. 




   “Sailing to Byzantium”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Feb 1985

Charles Phillips is a 20th-century New Yorker in a 50th-century world of immortal leisurites who recreate cities from the past. The one item that you should find out for yourself, I’ll put into a cypher: rgwew ua bi runw relcwk~

 He knew very little about himself, but he knew that he was not one of them. That he knew. He knew that his name was Charles Phillips and that before he had come to live among these people he had lived in the year 1984, when there had been such things as computers and television sets and baseball and jet planes, and the world was full of cities, not merely five but thousands of them, New York and London and Johannesburg and Parks and Liverpool and Bangkok and San Francisco and Buenos Ares and a multitude of others, all at the same time. 


   “The Lost Garden of Enid Blyton, Beatrix Potter, Lucy Atwell and the Rest of the Lads of the 32nd Parachute Regiment”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1985

Offa Smith travels to the Garden of Eden to prevent Eve from eating the apple and thereby guarantee immortality for himself (and all mankind, though that’s beyond the point).

 Lets put it this way—if you do persuade the lady to take a bite, you lose your legs. 


   “Klein’s Machine”
by Andrew Weiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1985

After Philip Herbert Klein returns from a psycosis-inducing trip in his time machine, he has philosophical conversations with his psychiatrist.

 The hamster is back. Also my wristwatch, which I strapped on its back. 




   A Matter of Time
by Glen Cook
First publication: Apr 1985

Detective Norman cash begins to wonder whether the mysterious dead body found in his small town has it’s origin in another time. Meanwhile, on the other “time axes,” Cash’s MIA son has been brainwashed by the communists, and sabotage in the far future has blown a small gang into the 19th century.

 Norman Cash, line-walker, began to sense the line’s existence at the point labeled March 4, 1975 




   Trancers Movies
first movie by Danny Bilson and Paul DeMeo (Charles Band, director)
First movie: 22 May 1985

In the first of the six (really!) Trancer movies (plus a “lost” short), heroic trancer-hunter Jack Deth follows evil trancer-maker Martin Whistler from 2247 to 1985 via a drug-induced time-travel that can take you back to the body of an ancestor. What I don’t fully understand is how they blackmailed Helen Hunt to appear in the first three as Deth’s 1985 love interest.
  1. Trancers (22 May 1985) Jack v. Whistler
  2. Trancers II (22 Aug 1991) Jack v. Whistler’s brother
  3. Trancers III (14 Oct 1992) Jack back to the future
  4. Trancers 4: Jack of Swords (2 Feb 1994) Jack v. Calaban
  5. Trancers 5: Sudden Deth (9 Nov 1994) Jack v. Calaban (II)
  6. Trancers 6 (23 Jul 2002) Jack (using stock footage) & Jo

 Greetings to the council. As you may have gathered, I have survived the pathetic trap set by Trooper Deth on Mecon 7. For twelve long years, you have hunted my disciples like dogs. Now, my day of vengence is at hand. Iv synthesized a time drug, and in a moment shall retreat down the dark corridors of history. Know that it is I who is solely responsible for your demise. One by one, your ancestors shall be murdered, and you, their progeny, shall cease to exist. Then shall I return, join my legion, and claim the seat of power for my own. Adieu . . . adieu . . . 




   Back to the Future
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 3 Jul 1985

Typical teenager Marty McFly meets Doc Brown for the first test of his DeLorean time machine, but when Libyan terrorists strike, things go awry, Marty and the DeLorean end up in 1955 where his parents are teens, and Doc must now send Marty back to the future.

 Next Saturday night, we’re sending you . . . back to the future! 




   1985 Pepsi Commercial
First aired: Summer 1985

 Relax, Smith. What could 12 oz. of Pepsi possibly change? 




   My Science Project
by Jonathan R. Betuel (Betuel, director)
First release: 9 Aug 1985

Not even the support of a young Fisher Stevens (Gary’s friend Chuck from Early Edition) could rescue this story of a high school motorhead who steals a power-sucking, space-time transforming orb from a miltary base for his science project.

 Now that sounds like were dealing with a time-space warp. 




   Contact
by Carl Sagan
First publication: Sep 1985

Sagan’s philosophical opus centers around Dr. Ellie Arrowway, the discovery of a radio message from Vega, and the subsequent building of a machine in accordance with directions in the message. A key twist in the plot requires Ellie to briefly posit time travel as the only explanation that fits her scientific viewpoint.

 You know, its not called a space-time continuum for nothing. If they can make tunnels through space, I suppose they can make some kind of tunnels through time. 




   “Mozart in Mirrorshades”
by Bruce Sterling and Lewis Shiner
First publication: Omni, Sep 1985

Time travelers are pilfering 18th century resources and generally polute their century with pieces of modern culture.

And a little bone to pick, not with this story, but with Harry Turtledove, editor of The Best Alternate History Stories of the 20th Century, which includes this story. I suppose he’s just marketing the book with a title that he supposes will sell, but I would like a clear distinction drawn between alternate history (What if the South won the war?), time travel (such as this story), and true history (such as the true story of how Asimov met Campbell).

 At first Sutherland hadnt wanted Rice at the meeting with Jefferson. But Rice knew a little temporal physcis, and Jefferson had been pestering the American personnel with questions about time holes and parallel worlds. 




   Transformers Cartoons
created by Takara Tomy
First time travel: 24 Oct 1985

Two groups of robots who crashed to Earth in the distant past have returned to life and are making Earth—past and present—their battleground. These are the time-travel cartoon episodes that I spotted in the four original seasons (1984-1987) and in the Beast Wars episodes (1996-1999) in which time travel was commonplace. I haven’t seen the later series [Robots in Disguise (2000-2002), the Unicron Trilogy (2001-2006), the more recent animated series (2007-2010), and the webisodes (2010)].
  1. Dinobot Island, Part 2 (26 Sep 1985)
  2. A Decepticon . . . King Arthur’s Court (24 Oct 1985) }
  3. Forever Is a Long Time Coming (8 Oct 1986)
  4. Beast Wars, Part 1 (16 Sep 1996)
  5. Code of Hero (9 Mar 1998)
  6. The Agenda, Part 3 (13 Mar 1998)
  7. Optimal Situation (25 Oct 1998)
  8. Cutting Edge (15 Nov 1998)
  9. Other Victories (5 Mar 1999)
  10. Nemesis, Part 2 (7 Mar 1999)

 They were called Autobots and Decepticons. But the brutal Decepticons were driven by a single goal: total domination. They set out to destroy the peace-loving Autobots, and a war between the forces of good and evil raged across Cybertron. 




   “Under Siege”
by George R.R. Martin
First publication: Omni, Oct 1985

After a nuclear war, Americans attempt to prevent the rise of Russia at the outset of the 19th century by traveling back to that time and inhabiting the bodies of key Finnish and Swedish military men during the siege of Sveaborg.

 He began to babble about Sveaborg, about the importance of what we are doing here, about the urgent need to change something, somehow, to prevent the Soviet Union from ever coming into existence, and thus forestall the war that has laid the world to waste. 




   The Cat Who Walks Through Walls
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Nov 1985

Richard Ames doesn’t like the fact that a new acquaintance was killed while dining at his table. Killed, why? and by whom? and why won’t that cat stay put? The eventual answers could lead Richard to Lazarus Long, the Time Corps, and more multiperson pantheistic solipsism.

 My darling had planned a pianissimo approach: Live for a time on Tertius (a heavenly place), get me hooked on multiverse history and time travel theory, et cetera. Not crowd me about signing up, but depend on the fact that she and Gretchen and Ezra and others (Uncle Jock, e.g.) were in the Corps . . . until I asked to be allowed to be sworn in. 




   The Twilight Zone (2nd Series)
created by Rod Serling
First time travel: 6 Jan 1985

Three seasons with 7 time-travel episodes. Harlan Ellison was a consultant on the series that included an adaptation of his “One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty.” The series also adapted Sturgeon’s “Yesterday Was Monday’, altering the plot and renaming it to “A Matter of Minutes,” and George R.R. Martin did the script for the time-travel episode “The Once and Future King” based on an idea submitted by Bryce Maritano.
  1. One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty (6 Dec 1985)    Hero to his childhood
  2. A Matter of Minutes (24 Jan 1986) From 9:33 AM to 11:37 AM
  3. Profile in Silver (7 Mar 1986) Kennedy in 1963
  4. The Once and Future King (27 Sep 1986) Elvis in 1954
  5. The Junction (21 Feb 1987) To 1912
  6. Time and Teresa Golowitz (10 Jul 1987) Hero to his youth
  7. Extra Innings (1 Oct 1988) Baseball in 1910

 Let the record show that in any age—good or bad—there are men of high ideals: men of courage, men who do more than that for which they are called upon. You will not always know their names. But let their deeds stand as monuments, so that when the human race is called to judgment, we may say, ‘This too was humanity!’ 

—JFK in “Profile in Silver”




   Conrad Stargard’s Adventures
by Leo Frankowski
First book: Feb 1986

Conrad Stargard, 20th century Polish engineer, stumbles through a time portal that was accidentally left open by those meddlers in the Historical Corps, and finds himself in 13th century Poland, whereupon he does any Connecticut Yankee proud.

One night when we were playing duplicate bridge, Bryan Campbell told me that this was the favorite time-travel series of a friend of his, which goes to show that just because my rating of a story is low, doesn’t mean that you (or Bryan’s friend) won’t enjoy it.
  1. The Cross-Time Engineer (Feb 1986)
  2. The High-Tech Knight (Mar 1989)
  3. The Radiant Warrior (Jul 1989)
  4. The Flying Warlord (Oct 1989)
  5. Lord Conrad’s Lady (Sep 1990)
  6. Conrad’s Quest for Rubber (Dec 1998)
  7. Conrad’s Time Machine (Sep 2002)
  8. Lord Conrad’s Crusade (Aug 2005)

 “This country and this century are in horrible shape because of the lack of socialism!”
   “You are absolutely right, Sir Conrad! What is socialism?”
 




  Dragonriders of Pern #8
Nerilka’s Story
by Anne McCaffrey
First publication: Mar 1986

The time of sickness, first told in Dragonlady of Pern, is recounted from the viewpoint of Nerilka, Lady Holder of Hold Ruatha.

 Desdra also tole me, since she knew me to be discreet and trustworthy, how the dragonriders had managed to make so many deliveries. This had contributed to their total exhaustion, a major factor in the tragedy: Dragons could go as easily between one time and another as one place to another. Moreta and Holth had overtaxed their strength this way. For only by stretching time in this bizarre fashion, or rather doubling back on themselves, could MOreta and Holth manage to deliver serum to all the holds on the Keroon plains. 




   “The Pure Product”
by John Kessel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Mar 1986

A cynical psychopath from the future takes a road trip (sometimes with random blood, sometimes with trite tripping) across 20th-century North America.

 “I said, have you got something going,” she repeated, still with the accent—the accent of my own time. 




   Highway of Eternity
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: June 1986

Jay Corcoran and Tom Boone are trying to track down a missing client when the building they are in is demolished and the two of them jump into a time machine that takes them to one of the pockets of rebels from the far future who are resisting the decorporealization of man.

 Horace, the hardheaded, practical lout, the organizer, the schemer. Emma, the moaner, the keeper of our consciences. Timothy, the student. Enid, the thinker. And I, the loafer, the bad example, the one who makes the others feel virtuous. 




   Flight of the Navigator
by Mark H. Baker, Michael Burton and Matt MacManus (Randal Kleiser, director)
First release: 30 Jul 1986

Twelve-year-old David Freeman stumbles down a ravine and wakes up eight years later without having aged, but that’s not the time travelin’ in this movie, which occurs only after he becomes the pilot of a small space ship that’s been collecting specimens from around the galaxy.

Janet said that I had to mention I fell asleep during this one.

 This is totally rad. Youre like my big little brother. 


   “Landscape with Giant Bison”
by Avram Davidson
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1986

Never is it easy to discern what’s in the mind of the indiscernable Avram Davidson, but I suspect that he was on a train journey with a plethora of tourists—perhaps the California Zephyr, which enters the majestic Rockies at a point just outside of Eldorado State Park—and he thought to himself, “Just what would it take to pull my fellow travelers away from that there card game?”

 A wooly rhino appeared out of nowhere on the right side of the track, its red hide caked with mud and dust, and paced the car for two miles; then it slackened and turned away, was lost to sight. 




   Lazer Tag Academy
produced by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears
First episode: 13 Sep 1986

Young Jamie Jaren, the Lazer Tag champion of 3010, travels back to 1980 to protect her distant teenaged ancestors from the evil Draxon Drear who was unwittingly released into that earlier era.

 As Drear races through time in his quest to conquer the future, he is pursued by Jamie Jaren. Jamie must team with her ancestors Tom, Beth and Nicky Jaren. Join us now in their adventure through time to preserve the past, save the future, and keep the peace established by . . . the Lazer Tag Academy! 




   Peggy Sue Got Married
by Jerry Leichtling and Arlene Sarner (Francis Coppola, director)
First release: 10 Oct 1986

Middle-aged Peggy Sue has two grown children and an adulterous husband whom she married at 18, so will she do things the same when she finds herself back in 1960 in her senior year of high school?

 Well, Mr Snelgrove, I happen to know that in the future I will not have the slightest use for algebra, and I speak from experience. 




   Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
by Gene Roddenberry, Leonard Nimoy, Have Bennett, et. al. (Nimoy, director)
First release: 26 Nov 1986

As the brave crew of the Enterprise are returning to Earth to stand trial for the events of the previous movie, Spock determines that Earth’s demise is imminent unless they can return to 1986 and retrieve a humpback whale (which they then proceed to do).

I saw this in the theater with Deb Baker and Jon Shultis during a winter trip to Pittsburgh for a small computer science education conference.

 McCoy: You realize that by giving him the formula you’re alterning the future.
Scotty: Why? How do we know he didnt invent the thing? 




   Muppet Babies
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 27 Dec 1986

As babies, all the muppets are occasionally looked after by Nannie. They first time traveled by taking Gonzo’s supersonic snowmobile trike back to rescue Nanny’s ruined yearbook in “Back to the Nursery.”
  1. Back to the Nursery (27 Dec 1986) trike to the past
  2. Romancing the Weirdo (11 Nov 1989) a time machine in Gonzo’s novel
  3. The Next Generation (15 Sep 1990) Rowlf visits his future grandson

 But how can we replace a picture taken a zillion years ago? 

—“Back to the Nursery”



No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Tangents” by Greg Bear, Omni, Jan 1986 [4D spacial topology ]

House by Ethan Wiley, 28 Feb 1986 [ghost story ]

Dragonriders of Pern #8.1: “The Girl Who Heard Dragons” by Anne McCaffrey, May 1986 [no time travel ]

   “Le gouffre des années”
English title: “The Gulf of the Years” (translated from French)
by Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud
First publication: Le héroes blessé au bras, 1987

I read the English translation from Châteaureynaud’s collection, A Life on Paper (2010). The story tells of a man who returns to occupied France during World War II on the morning that his mother was killed by an errant bomb. I enjoyed the writing, but was unsatisfied with the ending.

 Youre Jean-Jacques Manoir, arent you? Right? You dont know me, but I know all about you. 




   Project Pendulum
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: 1987

Ricky and Sean Gabrielson, 23-year-old identical twins, are the first men to travel through time, taking ever larger swings that send one backward and one forward.

This was the first book that I read in the rare books room of the University of Colorado library from the Brian E. Lebowitz Collection of 20th Century Jewish American Literature.

 Hi there. Youre not going to believe this, but Im you of the year 2016, taking part in the first time-travel experiment ever. 




   Timefall
by James Kahn
First publication: Feb 1987

This is the third book in Kahn’s New World trilogy, but the hero Joshua doesn’t know about the post-apocalyptic fantasy adventures of World Enough, and Time (Book I) and Time’s Dark Laughter (Book II). Could this be a prequel? Well, sort of. Time is cyclic and a previous version of Joshua has left him a message that leads Joshua of our world, wife of our world, and millionaire of our world to a lost city in the Amazon where the people think Joshua is their god arisen. Oh, and there are tunnels to different times and a circuitous but definite, supramundane possibility that the entire cyclical universe is going to end (or maybe never even exist in the first place).

The 2014 release of the book includes new material.

 We hurried him into the den, plugged in the skull, gave him a demonstration on the wall, showed him the composite map wed constructed: the rivers, the road, the city. 




   Fraggle Rock
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 23 Feb 1987

The symbolic and colorful world of Jim Henson’s fraggle muppets included at least one moment of time travel when Mokey, Boober and Wembly are mysteriously transported back to a time of fraggles who cannot laugh.

 Wouldnt it be fun to travel in time? O’ course, you wouldnt really go anywhere. No, Sprocket, because the past and the future are happening now, here in the present. Its all a question of perception. I thought dogs knew things like that. 


   “Dinosaur on a Bicycle”
by Tim Sullivan
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Mar 1987

Harry Quince-Pierpont Fotheringgay, the assistant to the learned Sir Brathewaite pedals a time bicycle from a civilized Victorian era to the distant path where, among others, he meets his own tyranosaur ancestor and two talking simians.

 As far as Harry was concerned, they were getting altogether too near his gigantic ancestor now. 


The story also appeared in this 1990 collection.   “The Silver Box”
by Louise Lawrence
First publication: A Quiver of Ghosts, Mar 1987

While searching for a ghost in the past, Mark and Zak stumble upon young Carole, shut up in her bedroom with glandular fever in 1987.

 What else do we live for but the little mundane things of life? If we sit around waiting for the few, rare wonderful moments that make it all worthwhile we may as well not live at all. 




   Timestalkers
adapted by Brian Clemens (Schultz, director)
First aired: 10 Mar 1987 (made-for-tv)

After the death of his wife and child, Dr. Scott McKenzie stumbles upon a tintype photograph from the old west with three corpses, a shooter and a modern Magnum 357, leading him to develop a theory of time travel that is soon confirmed when a beautiful woman of the future appears to take him back to the old west in order to chase the shooter, save President Cleveland, and pursue other obvious plot developments.

 Georgia: Very impressive, professor. Its a small wonder you were considered one of the worlds foremost authorities.
The Professor: [incredulously] Were? 




   Amazing Stories
created by Steven Spielberg
First time travel: 20 Mar 1987

Steven Spielberg brought Amazing Stories to tv in two seasons of an anthology format. At least one time-travel story—Jack Finney’s venerable “Such Interesting Neighbors”—appeared in the second season (20 Mar 1987).

Janet and I bought our first color tv for these episodes, a Sony of course.

 Oh, Randy, neighbors are always strange; those are the rules. 


   “Perpetuity Blues”
by Neal Barrett, Jr.
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1987

Orphaned at a young age and sent to live with her abusive aunt and uncle, Maggie befriends the town’s odd duck, Oral, whose magic loop of wire protects the young girl. Oh—and I forgot to mention: Oral believes he’s from outer space and his ship bounces him through time.

 Got the ship clear out of the atmosphere and hit this time warp or something. Nearly got eat by Vikings. Worse than the Mormons. Fixed up the ship and flipped it out again. Ended up in Medival Europe. Medicis and monks, all kinds of shit. Joined someones army in Naples. Got caught and picked olives for a duke. Lok at my face. They got diseases you never heard of there. 




   Sphere
by Michael Crichton
First publication: 12 May 1999

Because he wrote a government report on how to handle alien contact, psychologist Norman Johnson is called to the scene when the Navy discovers a 300-year-old crashed space ship on the Pacific floor. But it turns out to be an American space ship, just not from today’s America.

 And yet now we have proof that time travel is possible—and that our own species will do it in the future! 


   “Rider”
aka “Fugue”
by Andrew Weiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jul 1987

Arnold Lerner is deep into a fugue—a state that allows him to revisit past memories and rewrite them in your own mind. But he’s so deeply in fugue that he won’t ever come out. Then again, some people doubt both those sentences: Ruth Brandon, director of the Hartley Mind Research Center, says that it’s a long shot, but she might be able to go in after Lerner and pull him out; and some say that the rewriting of history is not just in your own mind.

Among other places, the story takes Ruth Brandon to the 1970 total solar eclipse in Miahuatlán; and quite by coincidence, I first read the story when I happened to take the July 1987 issue of Asimov’s with me on our road trip to Scottsbluff to see the Great American Coast-to-Coast eclipse of 2017. The stars (and the Moon) move in mysterious ways.

 Even if you do come back. They say you really do travel in time and that you really can change things if you try hard enough. 




   To Sail Beyond the Sunset
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Jul 1987

In the 19th century, Maureen Johnson grows up near Kansas City, eventually marrying and raising her own brood, including Lazarus Long (the original) and Lazarus Long (from the future).

 I found myself offering my hand and greeting a young man who matched in every way (even to his body odor, which I caught quite clearly—clean male, in fresh rut)—a man who was my father as my earliest memory recalled him. 


   “At the Cross-Time Jaunter’s Ball”
by Alexander Jablokov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1987

Jacob Landstatter is an art critic, and his chosen objects d’art are the alternate realities that the Lords of Time commission from artists who go back in time to make specific changes that result in worlds of one sort or another. So who could want to kill someone with such an occupation as innocuous as Jacob’s?

 Normal intestinal flora. Mutated and hybridized with amyotrophic lateral schlerosis. Infects via the GI tract and destroys the central nervous systems of higher primates. Neat. Grew it in the guts of an Australopithecine on the African veldt, two, three million years ago. Not easy, Jacob, not easy. When I woke up on that pallet at Centrum, I had bedsores, and a headache that lasted a month. Killed them all. Every last one of the buggers. Nothing left on this planet with more brains than an orangutan. 




   Masters of the Universe
by David Odell (Gary Goddard, director)
First release: 7 Aug 1987

With the help of ominous John-Williams-soundalike music and a Cosmic Key that opens portals to other places, the evil Skeletor has finally conquered Castle Greyskull, giving him the power needed to become the Master of the Universe himself. Fortunately, He-Man and his warriors have a copy of the key and can save the universe! Unless they misplace it and two current-day Earth teens stumble upon it.

I watched the movie through to the end(!), but spotted only one explicit small item to indicate that the key might transport through time as well as space: When Skeletor’s minionette locates the copy of the key, she says that they can find it within a “parsec-eon,” which kind of sounds like a space-time measurement. In addition, those who know the He-Man franchise tell me that he is a far-future descendant of Earth humans on the planet of Eternia, which means that the trip back to current-day Earth was through time. So it is a time-travel movie(!) but that fact has no bearing on the movie’s plot.

 I call it . . . The Cosmic Key! It is the most unique key in the universe. The tones it generates can open a doorway to anywhere. 




   Calvin and Hobbes
by Bill Watterson
First time travel: 31 Aug 1987

 Relax! We’ll be back as soon as we go. 


   ““Lui-même en Anachron””
by Cordwainer Smith
First publication: Les puissances de’espace, Sep 1987

Tasco Magnon, time traveler, decides to take his new bride on his next trip through time—a quest to find the mythical Knot in Time, where the two of them get trapped and only one can return.

After Smith’s death in 1966, the story was completed by his wife and sold to Harlan Ellison’s anthology The Last Dangerous Vision. In 1987, a translated version of the story was published in a French collection of Smith’s stories, so that the first published version was in French (although I have listed the English title above, since that’s how it was written). The English version was finally publisheded in Smith’s 1993 complete short science fiction collection by NESFA. By then, Ellison’s rights to the story had expired, although that didn’t stop him from suing NESFA.

 ‘Honeymoon in time,’ indeed. Why? Is it that your woman is jealous of your time trips? 


   Replay
by Ken Grimwood
First publication: Sep 1987

After 43-year-old radio newsman Jeff Winston dies, he finds himself back in his 18-year-old body in 1963—an occurrence that keeps happening each time he dies again in 1988; eventually, in one of his lives, he finds Pamela, another replayer, and they work at figuring out the meaning of it all (without success).

 So he hadnt died. Somehow, the realization didnt thrill him, just as his earlier assumption of death had failed to strike him with dread. 




   The Jukebox Stories
by Dean Wesley Smith
First story: Night Cry, Fall 1987

A jukebox in the Garden Lounge does more than make you remember the time of the song. It actually takes you to that time.

I’ve yet to find a good guide to these stories and where they can be obtained. The first story, “The Jukebox Man’ appeared in 1987 in a sister magazine to The Twilight Zone Magazine. Here’s a list of the other stories that I know of, although the only one I’ve read so far is “Jukebox Gifts’:
  1. The Jukebox Man (Fall 1987) Night Cry
  2. A Bubble for a Minute (Jan 1994) By Any Other Fame
  3. Jukebox Gifts (Jan 1994) F&SF
  4. Black Betsy (Oct 1994) Alternate Outlaws
  5. The Ghost of the Garden Lounge (Nov 2005) Time After Time
  6. He Could Have Coped with Dragons (Nov 2009) chapbook
  7. A Golden Dream (Jul 2010) chapbook
  8. The Songs of Memory (Jul 2012) chapbook
  9. Our Slaying Song Tonight (Oct 2012) chapbook
  10. The Wages of the Moment (Jan 2013) chapbook
  11. She Arrived without a Song (May 2013) chapbook

 I had carefully typed onto labels the names of over sixty Christmas songs, then taped them next to the red buttons. Somewhere in this jukebox, I hoped there would be a special song for each man. A song that would trigger a memory and a ride into the past. My Christmas present to each of them. 

—“Jukebox Gifts”


The Time Guardian by John Baxter and Brian Hannant (Hannant, director), 3 Dec 1987
When terminatoresque cyborgs attack a future Australian city (headed by Quantum Leap’s favorite scoundrel, Dean Stockwell, and defended by everyone’s favorite princess, Carrie Fisher), the scientists taken them all back in time—a fine plan until the evil cyborgs follow.


No Time Travel.
Move along.
The Year Before Yesterday by Brian Aldiss, 1987 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Enter a Soldier, Later: Enter Another” by Robert Silverberg, Asimov’s, Jun 1989 [simulacrum ]

“Left or Right?” by Martin Gardner, Mathenauts, Jun 1987 [4D spacial topology ]

“Traplanda” by Charles Sheffield, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1987 [despite appearances, no time travel ]

Dragonriders of Pern #8.1.A1: Dragonharper by Jody Lynn Nye, Jul 1987 [no time travel ]
aka A Crossroads Adventure in the World of Anne McCaffrey’s Pern: Dragonharper



   The Devil’s Arithmetic
by Jane Yolen
First publication: 1988

In fifth grade, Hannah read this intense novel of a young modern Jewish girl thrown back to the concentration camps of World War II Germany.

 Hannah was stunned. It was as if shed suddenly been transported to a movie set. 






   One Life to Live
created by Agnes Nixon
First time travel: 1988

In a 1988 plot line (“Buchanan City”), Clint ends up back in 1888 where he falls in love and is betrothed to Viki’s look-alike ancestor Ginny!

Apart from Dark Shadows (which, as we all know, was more than a soap opera), this is the first time travel that I’ve spotted in a soap.

 Ginny: I was staring up at the night sky trying to find that extra planet that you claimed was there when I was giving the children their astronomy lesson today.
Clint: Why cant you just take my word for it?
Ginny: Because brilliant scientists have studied the heavens and deduced that there are only a certain number of planets in our solar system—eight, just eight. And then you come along and throw the whole system out of question! 




   Lightning
by Dean Koontz
First publication: 1988

Right from her birth, Laura Shane has had a quick wit, a fateful loss of those close to her, and a time-traveling guardian angel who is himself chased by his evil compatriots.

 One of the things he had learned from the experiments in the institute was that reshaping fate was not always easy. Destiny struggled to reassert the pattern that was meant to be. Perhaps being molested and psychologically destroyed was such an immutable part of Lauras fate that Stefan could not prevent it from happening sooner or later. 




   “The Turning Point”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Drabble Project, 1 Apr 1988

In exactly 100 words, Madison goes back in time to meet himself at the turning point of his young life.

Thanks to Marc Richardson for sending this one to me.

 He was a clerk. 


   “Fire, Fire”
by Allison Prince
First publication: A Haunting Refrain, May 1988

When young Emma falls behind her parents on a country outing, she finds herself at a Neolithic funeral pyre.

 Emma, we cant keep waiting for you all the time. We"re nearly at the top—see you up there, all right? Its not far. 


   “Many Mansions”
by Alexander Jablokov
First publication: May 1988

Working for an alien time cop, Mattias jumps through fixed wormholes in time, heading to medieval France, North America in the last ice age, ancient Egypt, 17th-century Persia, and probably a few other places that he and I are having trouble remembering. We both need a vacation.

 It took most of Isaac Newtons Principia to snap him out of it. 




   Star Trek: The Next Generation
created by Gene Roddenberry
First time travel: 2 May 1988

I watched the premier with Harry and Cathy just four weeks before Hannah was born. In the seven seasons, there were 12 time-travel episodes.
  1. We’ll Always Have Paris (2 May 1988) repeated seconds
  2. Time Squared (3 Apr 1989) back six hours
  3. Yesterday’s Enterprise (19 Feb 1990) Enterprise C from 2344 to 2366
  4. Captain’s Holiday (2 Apr 1990) Vorgans from 27th century
  5. A Matter of Time (18 Nov 1991) historian from 26th century
  6. Cause and Effect (23 Mar 1992) time loop
  7. Time’s Arrow I/II (15 Jun / 21 Sep 1992) to 1890s San Francisco
  8. Tapestry (15 Feb 1993) Picard’s earlier life
  9. Firstborn (25 Apr 1994) Worf’s son from 40 years ahead
  10. All Good Things I/II (23 May 1994) jumping between three times

 Make it so. 




   Gumby Adventures
created by Art Clokey
First time travel: 25 Jun 1988

In the 1988 episode “Lost in Chinatown,” Gumby’s claymation sister Minga travels through a magic tapestry to ancient China, and Gumby must rescue her!

 Wow: a picture on silk! It looks real old. I wonder what life in China was like in those days. While waiting for Grandma, Ill go and find out. 




  Dragonriders of Pern #8.1.A2
Dragonfire
aka A Crossroads Adventure in the World of Anne McCaffrey’s Pern: Dragonfire
by Jody Lynn Nye
First publication: Jul 1988

Nye wrote two choose-your-own-adventure books in the world of Pern. I didn’t spot any time travel in the first (Dragonharper), but one of the branches of this second book involves the heroine, Mirrim, and her green dragon, Path, timing it back in three possible ways.

 Path crooned deep in her throat . . . 


   “The Grandfather Problem”
by Andrew Weiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1988

Purely as a scientific experiment, physicist Harold Levett decides to go back in time to kill his grandfather.

 “Its nothing personal,” I say. “Its strictly a scientific question . . .” 


   Insurance Fraud
by Mark Heath
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Aug 1988

 Full coverage in event of death due to suicidal, time-traveling grandsons . . . 




   “Ripples in the Dirac Sea”
by Geoffrey A. Landis
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1988

A physics guy invents a time machine that can go only backward and must always return the traveler to the exact same present from which he left.

 

  1. Travel is possible only into the past.
  2. The object transported will return to exactly the time and place of departure.
  3. It is not possible to bring objects from the past to the present.
  4. Actions in the past cannot change the present.
 

   “On the Watchtower at Plataea”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Other Edens II, Nov 1988

Miriam and her fellow time travelers, John and Stan, set up camp in an abandoned watchtower to observe and record the siege of the walled city-state Plataea in the Peloponnesian War.

 It was a shock to find that the expedition could go no further back than 429 BC; though for some of us, it was not an unwelcome one. Miriam was perhaps the only one amongst us who was annoyed that we couldn't get to Pericles. He had died earlier, in the part of the year we couldnt reach. So near—but we had hit a barrier, as solid as a rockface on the path of linear time, in the year that the Peloponnesian War was gaining momentum. 




   The Navigator: A Medieval Odyssey
by Geoff Chapple, Kely Lyons and Vincent Ward (Ward, director)
First release: 15 Dec 1988

To ward off the Black Death, young Griffin, local hero Connor, and others from their village plan to dig a whole through the Earth where they'll give an offering to the powers that be, but instead, they end up digging a tunnel to a marvelous twentieth-century city.

 Think how much power youd need for all that! 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
Waxwork by Anthony Hickox, 17 Jun 1988 [secondary worlds ]

“The Fort Moxie Branch” by Jack McDevitt, Full Spectrum, Sep 1988 [no definite time travel ]

Dragonriders of Pern #9: Dragonsdawn by Anne McCaffrey, Oct 1988 [no time travel ]



   “The Instability”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The London Observer, 1 Jan 1989

Professor Firebrenner explains to Atkins how they can go forward in time to study a red dwarf and then return back to Earth.

 Of course, but how far can the Sun and Earth move in the few hours it will take us to observe the star? 


   “Real Time”
by Lawrence Watt-Evans
First publication: Asimovs’s Science Fiction, Jan 1989

An unnamed time-travel guard is trapped in the 20th century and must keep ever vigilant against those who might tamper with the time line because you never know whether the time guard will be able to handle it all.

 They might send someone else, but they might not. The tampering might have already changed things too much. 


The story also appeared in this 1994 collection.   “The Ring of Memory”
by Alexander Jablokov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan 1989

Time travel agent Hugh Solomon chases through time after Andy Tarkin who blames Hugh for the death of their common crush in 1902 Chicago.

The story has a nice bootstrapping paradox.

 Have you sold a ring recently, in the shape of a serpent with its own tail in its mouth? 




   Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure
by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon (Stephen Herek, director)
First release: 17 Feb 1989

The Two Great Ones, Bill S. Preston, Esq., and Ted “Theodore” Logan, are the subjects of time-traveler Rufus’s mission, but instead they end up using his machine to write a history report to save their band Wyld Stallyns.

 Most excellent! 




   Quantum Leap
created by Donald Bellisario
First episode: 26 Mar 1989

Physicist and all-around good guy Sam Beckett rushes his time machine into production—funding is about to be cut!—and as a consequence, he shifts from one life to another, always with a moral mission and his holographic cohort Al.

 Oh boy! 




   “The Price of Oranges”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1989

Harry’s closet takes him back to 1937 where his social security income buys cheaper oranges, treats for his friend Manny, and possibly a companionable man for his jaded granddaughter Jackie.

 Harry bought a pair of socks, thick gray wool, for 89 cents. When the man took his dollar, Harry held his breath: each first time made a little pip in his stomach. But on one ever looked at the dates of old bills. He bought two oranges for five cents each, and then, thinking of Manny, bought a third. At a candystore he bought G-8 and His Battle Aces for fifteen cents. At The Collectors Cozy in the other time they would gladly give him thirty dollars for it. Finally, he bought a cherry Coke for a nickel and headed towards the park. 




   “Great Work of Time”
by John Crowley
First publication: Novelty: Four Stories, May 1989

When a secret society called the Otherhood acquires Caspar Last’s time machine in 1983, they set out to change history so that the British Empire never declines (although it may be infused with various Lovecraftian species such as the Draconics), an endeavor for which in 1956 they recruit Denys Winterset, one of the Colonial Service’s many assistant district commissioners of police.

 Of course the possible worlds we make dont compare to the real one we inhabit—not nearly so well furnished, or tricked out with details. And yet still somehow better. More satisfying. Perhaps the novelist is only a special case of a universal desire to reshape, to ‘take this sorry scheme of things entire,’ smash it into bits, and ‘remold it nearer to the hearts desire’—as old Kyayyám says. The egoist is continually doing it with his own life. To dream of doing it with history is no more useful a game, I suppose, but as a game, it shows more sport. 






   Field of Dreams
by Phil Aldin Robinson
First release: 5 May 1989

Corn farmer Ray Kinsella is called to build a ballpark in his cornfield (with part of his calling resulting from a trip to 1972); once the field is built, various ballplayers from the past come.

 If you build it, they will come. 




   “A Sleep and a Forgetting”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Playboy, Jul 1989

Mike is pulled out of his quiet tenured life as a professor in the Department of Sinological Studies at the University of Washington because his lifelong friend Joe Hedley seems to be receiving transmissions in Mongolian. When Mike arrives, he not only understands the transmission, but can talk back as well.

Time travel and alternate histories often overlap, usually when some incident of time travel to the past creates the alternate timeline. This story is an intriguing alternative where a supposedly alternate past history is discovered through the two-way transmission through time, but the origin of the alternate timeline remains a mystery.

 Weirder and weirder, I thought. A Christian Mongol? Living in Byzantium? Talking to me on the space telephone out of the twelfth century? 


   Mixed Doubles
by Daniel da Cruz
First publication: Aug 1989

Justin Pope, a music major (like Paul Eisebrey!), stumbles upon a time machine that he uses to kidnap Franz Schubert from his deathbed; Pope cures Franz and uses him as a source of compositions to create a magnificent career of his own (with the help of Angelica), until Franz turns the tables (with the help of Philipa).

Paul Eisenbrey introduced me to this author in college, but I found Mixed Doubles on my own some years later.

 From time to time double checking with the manual, he began to punch in the commands that, he had calculated from ceaseless experimentation, would project him three thousand years into the past, plus of minus fifteen years. It was a vast improvement on his first efforts, which had been accurate only to within two centuries. The reentry program was more precise by orders of magnitude: it would bring him back to the moment of departure, plus zero to seventeen hours. 




   Ray Bradbury Theater
created by Ray Bradbury
First time travel: 11 Aug 1989

Ray Bradbury Theater ran for two seasons on HBO starting 21 May 1985. It then shifted to the USA Network for four seasons which had three time-travel adaptations.
  1. A Sound of Thunder (11 Aug 1989) dinosaur hunt
  2. Touch of Petulance (12 Oct 1990) newspaper from the future
  3. The Toynbee Convector (26 Oct 1990)    100 years into the future

 Dinosaurs large and small fill my junkyard workroom.
This one given to me by a friend 30 years ago. These given as toys to my daughters, and when they didnt play with them I simply took them back. So with dinosaurs coming into my life, I often wondered what would happen if I could go back into theirs. Dinosaurs, time machines, put them together and you have a
tale one billion years old.
 

—Bradbury’s introduction to “A Sound of Thunder”




   Millennium
by John Varley (Michael Anderson, director)
First release: 25 Aug 1989

Cheryl Ladd plays Louise Baltimore opposite Kris Kristopherson’s Bill Smith.

 For one thing, paradoxes can occur. Say you build a time machine, go backwards in time and murder your father when he was ten years old. That means you were never born. And if you were never born, how did you build the time machine? Paradox! It's the possibility of wiping out your own existence that makes most people rule out time-travel. Still, why not? If you were careful, you could do it. 




   The Smurfs
created by Peyo (aka Pierre Culliford)
First time travel: 9 Sep 1989

While trying to return a dinosaur to its proper time at the start of Season 9, a time whirlwind whips the annoying little mushroom blueters into time—a condition that’s carried on through the rest of the season.

 Well, Papa Smurf, there is one way to get this critter back home, but its awfully dangerous. 




   Ring Raiders
by Phil Harnage
First episode: 16 Sep 1989

Matchbox produced and aired five cartoon episodes in 1989 to promote their Ring Raider line of toys including the time-traveling planes of the evil Skull Squadron and the right-stuff Ring Raider pilots.

 Lieutenant, Ive got three strange bogeys about a mile north-northwest. Theyre like nothing Ive ever seen before. They dont even have props. 




  Dragonriders of Pern #10
Renegades of Pern
by Anne McCaffrey
First publication: Nov 1989

A retelling of various episodes of Dragonriders / Dragonquest / The White Dragon from the perspective of Thella, who is the main renegade of the title.

Also in November of 1989, Jody Lynn Nye (with help from McCaffrey) released The Dragonlover’s Guide to Pern. No dragonreader should leave home without it.

 It was then obvious that the absconding dragons had gone between time to secure their theft. 




   Back to the Future II
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 22 Nov 1989

Doc Brown takes Marty and Jennifer from 1985 to 2015 to save their children from a bad fate, but the consequences pile up when Biff also gets in on the time-travel action.

 The time-traveling is just too dangerous. Better that I devote myself to study the other great mystery of the universe—women! 



Romance Time Travel of 1989

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
A Knight in Shining Armor by Jude Deveraux

Hornblower-Stone 1: Time Was by Nora Roberts

Hornblower-Stone 2: Times Change by Nora Roberts




No Time Travel.
Move along.
Dix mille ans dans un bloc de glace by Louis Boussenard [long sleep ]
English title: 10,000 Years in a Block of Ice

“How I Spent My Summer Vacation” by Pat Murphy, Time Gate, Dec 1989 [simulacrums ]

“The Ressurrection Machine” by Robert Sheckley, Time Gate, Dec 1989 [simulacrums ]

“The Rose and the Scalpel” by Gregory Benford, Time Gate, Dec 1989 [simulacrums ]

“Statesmen” by Poul Anderson, Time Gate, Dec 1989 [simulacrums ]

Mr. Belvedere (“A Happy Guy’s Christmas”) by Walter Snee, 16 Dec 1989 [a christmas carol ]



   Time Barbarians
by Joseph John Barmettler (Barmetler, director)
First release: 1990

In an ancient world of swords, sorcery, loin cloths, and jeweled bikinis, an evil thief kills King Deran’s queen before escaping to modern-day Los Angeles. Since the thief also took a magic amulet with him, a loinclothless wizardess sends Deran after him to retrieve the amulet and avenge the queen’s brutal death.

 The man you seek is in this world no longer. You must travel to another time to find him. 




   12:01 P.M.
by Richard Lupoff, Stephen Tolkin and Jonathan Heap (Heap, director)
First release: 1990 (27 minute short film)

Kurtwood Smith brings Myron Castleman’s 59 minutes to life.

 You see, it’s like . . . it’s like we’re stuck. You know, like a . . . like a needle on a scratched record. It all starts at 12:01, and everything goes along fine until one o’clock and then Bam! the whole world snaps back to 12:01 again. 




   Kappatoo
created by Ben Steed
First episode: 20 Jan 1990

In an amusing twist on The Prince and the Pauper, Kappatoo 70934 swaps places with his twentieth century lookalike, Simon, in this one-season series and its follow-up, Kappatoo II, in 1992. I like that Simon in the future had a computer as his foil, whereas back in our time, Kappatoo has a cat. The vintage 1990 PCs are also fun.

 Not where, when. When did I come from? Which happens to be the year 2270. 




   Eternity Comics’ The Time Machine
adapted by Bill Spangler and John Ross
First publication: Apr 1990

This three-issue black-and-white adaptation has some creative twists such as when it occurs to the traveller how to use the machine to destroy the Morlocks. In 1991, the three issues were issued as a single graphic novel in trade paperback size.

 I was elated! I gripped the starting lever with both hands and went off with a thud. 




   Back to the Future III
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 25 May 1990

Marty and 1955 Doc travel back to the old west where the older Doc is trapped along with various Biff ancestors and a possible love interest for Doc.

 It means your future hasn’t been written yet. No one’s has. Your future is whatever you make it. 




   Future Zone
aka Future Force 2
by David A. Prior (Prior, director)
First release: 18 Jul 1990

John Tucker—a future gunslinging cop in Mobile, AL, played by David Carradine—is visited by a thirty-year-old Billy who’s almost as quick on the draw as John. But—ah, Grasshopper—just where does the visitor’s prescient knowledge come from, and more to the point given the ending of the film: Who taught Billy to shoot?

 Tucker: Where’d you learn to shoot like that?
Billy: You might say I learned from the best.
Tucker: And who might that be?
Billy: You’d never believe me. 




   Alvin and the Chipmonks
by Dianne Dixon
First time travel: 8 Sep 1990

It was not until the final season of the Alvin revival (nearly two decades after creator Bagdasarian’s death) that Theodore, Simon and Alvin had a series of movie take-offs including Dianne Dixon’s episode, “Back to Our Future,” in which the quirky inventor Clyde Crashcup (filling in for Doc Brown) brings the 90s trio back to the 50s to stop the original trio from giving up their singing careers.

 Now remember boys, you must convince the old Alvin to stick with his musical career, so you can all be stars in the future! 




   Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventures (Animated)
produced by David Kirschner, Paul Sabella and Andy Heyward
First episode: 15 Sep 1990

 . . . featuring the most outstanding voices of the original Two Great Ones, but bogus plots and dialog.

 ♫ Whenever time stands still and trouble moves too fast, to save the future, we must learn about the past. ♫ 




   The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3
created by Reed Shelly and Bruce Shelly
First time travel: 29 Sep 1990

The animation and sound effects are a good reflection of the video game. In one episode (“Toddler Terrors of Time Travel”), the son of King Bowser invents a time machine to go back in time and stop Mario, Luigi and Toad from ever coming to their kingdom. The heroes stow away, and everyone ends up as toddlers in Brooklyn.

 Maybe we can go back and change history, King Dad. All we need is a little time travel. 




   The Spirit of '76
by Roman Coppola and Lucas Reiner (Reiner, director)
First release: 12 Oct 1990

In the year 2176, three time travelers aiming for 1776 end up in the time of David Cassidy and disco instead.

 Channel Six, our foremost epistomological anthrosociologist has redlined and outlined you for a mission back in time. 




   “The Time Traveler”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Nov 1990

The little demon Azazel (the hero of many an Asimov tale) sends a world-renowned writer travels back in time to see his first writing teacher at a 1934 school that is remarkably like Asimov’s own Boys High in Brooklyn.

 “Because,” and here he struck his chest a resounding thump, “the burning memories of youthful snubs and spurnings remain unavenged and, indeed, forever unavengable.” 




   Frankenstein Unbound
adapted by Roger Corman and F.X. Feeney (Corman, director)
First release: 2 Nov 1990

Joe Buchanan invents a weapon that was meant to be so terrible it would end war forever, but the weapon causes time rifts, one of which takes him (and his futuristic talking car, a.k.a. his electric carriage) back in time where he meets Dr. Frankenstein (a standoffish man, but willing to talk science), Frankenstein’s monster (who is fascinated with the talking car) and Mary Wollstonecraft (a budding author).

It did a reasonable job of bringing Brian Aldiss’s book’s premise to the screen, with a better pace than the book, but the short dream sequences were ineffective for me and Dr. Frankenstein is more of a clichéd villian than in the book.

 Zero pollution, maximum ozone shield: Something tells me were not in New Los Angeles any more. 


   “Ben Franklin’s Laser”
by Doug Beason
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1990

It appears that the sun will go nova in 75 hours, which leaves Grayson to go back in time to give a boost to science in Ben Franklin’s time.

 It sounded nice and simple: allow Ben Franklin to invent the laser and let the technology casade. Grow enough so that in five hundred years wed have something to get us out of this mess. 


   “3 RMS Good View”
by Karen Haber
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, mid-Dec 1990

When a lawyer from the future decides to rent an apartment in 1968 San Francisco, she must first sign your standard temporal noninterference contract—yeah, like that one ever holds up in court!

 Dont change the past or the past will change you. The time laws. You lawyers understand this kind of thing. You, and you alone, are responsible for any dislocation of past events, persons or things, et cetera et cetera. Read the small print and sign. 



No Time Travel.
Move along.
Time and Chance by Alan Brennert, Feb 1990 [alternate timelines ]

Jacob’s Ladder by Bruce Joel Rubin, 2 Nov 1990 [no definite time travel ]



   Warlock
by David Twohy (Steve Miner, director)
First release: 11 Jan 1991

A captured warlock in 1691 Massachusetts is thrown forward 300 years to Los Angeles with warlock-hunter Giles Redferne in hot pursuit. Twentieth century chase ensues with pretty nurse Kassandra aiding the hunter.

 A grand grimore? Here? Now? 




   “The Romanian Question”
by Michael Moorcock
First publication: Back Brain Recluse 18, Spring 1991

Jerry appears to be a time traveler (or maybe God) involved with Hitler and the democratic movement in Romania, but really did’t get it. But the bicycle he rides as a time machine shares a description with the time machine in “Behold the Man.”

 The time machine was a sphere of milky fluid attached to the front lamp-holder of a Raleigh “Royal Albert” Police Bicycle of the old, sturdy type, before all the corruption had been made public. 




   “Crossroads”
aka “Cross Roads Blues”
by Paul McAuley
First publication: Interzone, Apr 1991

In an alternate 1960s America where the U.S. is isolationist and Adam Clayton Powell is president, Time traveler (or “Loop rider”) Ike Turner has a fascination with blues player Bobby Johnson, so he sticks around a bit longer than he should in 1937 to meet the musician. It shouldn’t be a big deal; after all, according to Einstein, not even the Loop riders can change the past.

 Anyway, he went away maybe a year, and I dont know if he went to the crossroads with ol Legba or not, but Son House told me when he came back he was carryin a gitar, and asked for a spot like old times. Well, Son was about ready to take a break, and told Bobby Johnson to go ahead and got himself outside before the boy began. But that time it was all changed. That time, he tol me, the music he heard Bobby Johnson make put the hair on his head to standin. 




   “Robot Visions”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1991

A team of Temporalists send robot RG-32 200 years into the future where it seems to almost all that mankind is doing better than expected on Earth and in space.

 RG-32 was a rather old-fashioned robot, eminently replaceable. He could observe and report, perhaps without quite the ingenuity and penetration of a human being—but well enough. He would be without fear, intent only on following orders, and he could be expected to tell the truth. 


   Outlander
aka Cross Stitch
by Diana Gabaldon

I am a snob. Normally, I relegate time travel romances to the slag heap at the end of each year. But this novel changed the whole genre from a backwater to a raging waterfall, so it gets its own happy spot in the grown-up list.

 The truth is that nothing moved, nothing changed, nothing whatever appeared to happen and yet I experienced a feeling of elemental terror so great that I lost all sense of who, or what, or where I was. I was in the heart of chaos, and no power of mind or body was of use against it. 




   “The Gallery of His Dreams”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Axolotl Press, Jul 1991

Having spent his life and his fortune documenting the American Civil War, pioneering photographer Mathew Brady is repeatedly visited by a woman of the future who asks him to photograph the horrors of the wars she knows, starting with Hiroshima.

 Im sorry, maam,” Brady said. He didnt turn to see which portraits she had indicated. “I didnt mean to offend you. These portraits show what war really is, and I think its something we need to remember lest we try it again.” 




   T2: Judgement Day
by James Cameron and William Wisher, Jr. (Cameron, director)
First release: 1 Jul 1991

Once more, the machines from 2029 send back a killer cyborg, this time a T-1000 to kill John Connor himself in 1995, but Connor of the future counters by sending one of the original Model 101s to save himself.

 Come with me if you want to live. 

—The T-800 to Sarah at the Pescadero State Hospital




   Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey
by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon (Stephen Herek, director)
First release: 19 Jul 1991

Two Evil Robots come from the future to kill Bill and Ted and destroy their babes, and after that happens, the Two Great Ones begin a journey that starts with Death and ends with Two Little Ones.

 Look, after we get away from this guy, we use the booth. We time travel back to before the concert and set up the things we need to get him now. 




  Dragonriders of Pern #11
All the Weyrs of Pern
by Anne McCaffrey
First publication: Sep 1991

After the time of the first books, Pern undergoes a technological revival engendered by the rediscovery of the Admin AI built by the original colonists. An ambitious plan to eliminate Thread forever (yeah, like that’s gonna happen) hinges on time travel and blowing up engines on the Red Star.

 Jaxom shrugged as he changed pages. “A dragon has to know exactly the time when he is going to, or he can come out of between at the same spot hes inhabiting at that earlier time. Too close, and it is thought that both dragon and rider will die. Equally, its unwise to go any place you havent already been, so you shouldnt go forward, because you wouldnt know if you were there or not.” 




   Quantum Leap Comic Books
edited by George Broderick, Jr.
First publication: Sep 1991

Little known fact: The Quantum Leap comic books were actually written and drawn two decades before the birth of their creators, which is the only reason they have been given a special temporal dispensation overriding the law that forbids post-1969 comic books in this list. In the first issue, Sam desperately wants to save Martin Luther King Jr., but he realizes that’s not the reason he’s in Memphis.

 He awoke to find himself in the past, suffering from partial amnesia and facing a mirror image that was not his own. 




   Back to the Future (Animated)
created by Bob Gale
First episode: 14 Sep 1991

After III, Doc Brown and Clara settle and raise a family in Hill Valley, though “settle” might be the wrong word when you once again have a working DeLorean.

 You do sorta look like that J. Michael Fox guy. 




   “Bad Timing”
by Molly Brown
First publication: Interzone, Dec 1991

When Alan’s coworker tells him that an old women’s magazine has a romance story called “The Love That Conquered Time” with Alan himself as the hero, he is dubious, but he reads the thing nonetheless.

 Youre the only reason, Claudia. I did it for you. I read a story that you wrote and I knew it was about me and that it was about you. I searched in the Archives and I found your picture and then I knew that I loved you and that I had always loved you and that I always would. 




   Murder Most Horrid
starring by Dawn French
First time travel: 5 Dec 1991

In this anthology series, Dawn French finds herself in one murder story after another, including one tale of a “Determined Woman” physicist who uses her time machine in an attempt to change the happenings of one particular murder.

 If you dont get out of this house, Im going to murder you! 



Romance Time Travel of 1991

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
Stolen Brides 0.5: His Stolen Bride by Shelly Thacker




No Time Travel.
Move along.
In the Native State by Tom Stoppard, 20 Apr 1991 [parallel stories in different times ]

Time’s Arrow or the Nature of the Offence by Martin Amis, Sep 1991 [surreal ]



   “Down the River Road”
by Gregory Benford
First publication: After the King: Stories in Honor of J.R.R. Tolkien, Jan 1992

On the verge of becoming a man, John travels a river that is an admixture of time-flow and liquid metal—or possibly of magic and science—with the goal of finding out about a father whom he barely remembers.

 John followed the boot tracks away from the launch. They led inland, so there was no time pressure to fight. His clothes dried out as he walked beneath a shimmering patch of burnt-goald worldwall that hung tantalizingly behind roiling clouds. 




   ドラゴンボール
English title: Dragon Ball (translated from Japanese)
adapted by Takao Koyama
First time travel: 8 Jan 1992

Sent to Earth as a mere baby to lay preparations for an alien invasion, Goku suffers a clonk on the head, losing all memory of his mission and subsequently becoming a champion defender of our planet. I haven’t watched enough episodes to know for sure when the first time travel occurred, but it may have been in Episode 122 of the second Dragon Ball series (Dragon Ball Z, “My Dad is Vegeta”) in which time traveler Trunks arrives with a warning. Trunk and time traveling continued into the reboot series, Dragon Ball Z Kai, which I’ve seen on the Toon network.

 Thirdly, please tell me the grown-up version of my mysterious son from the future is with you. 

—Bulma in Dragon Ball Z Kai, “Bulma Discovers a Time Machine”




  Reggie Rivers #2
“The Big Splash”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jun 1992

Just what caused the dinosaurs’ extinction?

 The scientists had been arguing for half a century over the nature of the K-T Event. Some said a comet or a planetoid hit the Earth; others, that one or more of those big super-volcanoes, like the one that mad your Yellowstone Park, cut loose with an eruption that blanketed the Earth with ash and smoke. 




   Waxwork II: Lost in Time
by Anthony Hickox (Hickox, director)
First release: 16 Jun 1992

After the flaming climax at the end of Waxwork (which had no time travel that I could see), Mark and Sarah (a different actress) crawl home only to be followed by a disembodied hand that (before being garbage disposaled into tiny pieces) hacks Sarah’s nearly evil stepfather to death. Nobody at Sarah’s subsequent trial for murder believes that story, so after listening to a movie of dead Patrick Macnee, they escape into a series of bad horror movie remakes from Frankenstein to Aliens.

Of course, all these movies are set in different times, but is there any actual time travel? The final scene gives a definitive answer, although it does not manage to generate even half a star for my rating.

 We burned that place to the ground. Nothing could have got out. 




   Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventures (Live)
created by Darren Starr
First episode: 28 Jun 1992

The Two Great Ones become the two lame ones, although the Elvis episode has some redeeming factors.

 Its a completely creepy feeling to fail before a large group of Elvises. 




  Time Trap #2
Back to the Time Trap
by Keith Laumer
First publication: Jul 1992

Twenty-two years after the first installment, Laumer provides a sequel to Roger Tyson’s humorous adventures with powerful time traveling aliens who fling Roger back in forth in time.

 “This is Roger; hes as helpless and bewildered as I am. We were just planning how to escape from this, ah, time trap. How did you—’
“Went in the pantry,’ Fred grunted.
 




   “Two Guys from the Future”
by Terry Bisson
First publication: Omni, Aug 1992

Two guys from the future show up in an art gallery (to “salvage the works of art of your posteriors” because “no shit is fixing to hang loose any someday now.”) where they meet a security-guard-cum-artist and her boss, Mimsy.

 “We are two guys from the future.”
“Yeah, right. Now get the hell out of here!”
“Dont shoot! Is that a gun?”
That gave me pause; it was a flashlight.
 




  Reggie Rivers #3
“The Synthetic Barbarian”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 1992

Clifton Standish’s motivation for travel to the Mesozoic is not entirely what it seems.

 One day this bloke Standish came in with his friend Hofmann, saying they wanted a time safari to cave-man days, to shoot dinosaurs the way our ancestors used to do. 




   The Ugly Little Boy
aka Child of Time
novelization by Isaac Asimov and Robert Silverberg
First publication: Sep 1992

The story of Ms. Fellowes and Timmie is augmented by the story of what his tribe did during his time away.

 He was a very ugly little boy and Edith Fellowes loved him more dearly than anything in the world. 




   Darkwing Duck
created by Tad Stones
First time travel: 18 Sep 1992

The crimefighting duck (or his pals) time traveled at least five times, some of which used arch-nemesis Quackerjack’s Time Top (no word on whether it was stolen from Brick Bradford).
  1. Paraducks (18 Sep 1991) to earlier in DW’s life
  2. Quack of Ages (18 Nov 1991) back to 1921
  3. Time and Punishment (19 Nov 1991)     Gosalyn to the future
  4. Inherit the Wimp (19 Sep 1992) DW’s ancestors to the present
  5. Extinct Possibility (5 Dec 1992) to the time of the dinosaurs

 Need I remind you about the time with the floor wax, the peanut butter and my VCR? 




  Reggie Rivers #4
“Crocamander Quest”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: The Ultimate Dinosaur, Oct 1992

Long before T. rex was king of the predators, the Triassic was terrorized by the 5-meter long amphibian K. col with a meter-long head, a powerful jaw, and rows of sharp teeth.

 Imagine a newt or salamander expanded to crocodile size, with a huge head for catching smaller fry, and youll have the idea. Might call it a crocamander, eh? 




   The Guns of the South
by Harry Turtledove
First publication: Oct 1992

A faction from the early 21st century brings boatloads of AK-47 machine guns back to General Lee in the War between the States.

 My friends and I—everyone who belongs to America Will Break—come from a hundred and fifty years in your future. 




   Captain Planet and the Planeteers
aka The New Adventures of Captain Planet
created by Ted Turner and Barbara Pyle
First time travel: 31 Oct 1992

Gaia, the spirit of the Earth, sends out five magic rings which are obtained by teenagers who are then tasked with protecting the planet Earth, sometimes individually and sometimes by combining to call forth Captain Planet who (among other things) can even take them into the past (“OK at the Gunfight Corral”).

 There she is, boys: my own time machine. 


   Quantum Leap Novels
First book: Nov 1992

  1. The Novel (aka Carny Knowledge) (Nov 1992)    Ashley McConnell
  2. Too Close for Comfort (Apr 1993) Ashley McConnell
  3. The Wall (Jan 1994) Ashley McConnell
  4. The Beginning (Jan 1994, UK) Julie Robitaille
  5. The Ghost and the Gumshoe (Jan 1994, UK) Julie Robitaille
  6. Prelude (Jun 1994) Ashley McConnell
  7. Knights of Morningstar (Sep 1994) Melanie Rawn
  8. Search and Rescue (Dec 1994) Melissa Crandall
  9. Random Measures (Mar 1995) Ashley McConnell
  10. Pulitzer (Jun 1995) L. Elizabeth Storm
  11. Double or Nothing (Dec 1995) C.J. Henderson
  12. Odyssey (Mar 1996) Barbara E. Walton
  13. Independence (Aug 1996) John Peel
  14. Angels Unaware (Jan 1997) L. Elizabeth Storm
  15. Obsessions (Mar 1997) Carol Davis
  16. Loch Ness Leap (Jul 1997) Sandy Schofield
  17. Heat Wave (Nov 1997) Melanie Kent
  18. Foreknowledge (Mar 1998) Christo Defillipis
  19. Song and Dance (Oct 1998) Mindy Peterman
  20. Mirror’s Edge (Feb 2000) Ester D. Reese

 “Oh, boy,” he whispered. 




  Reggie Rivers #5
“The Satanic Illusion”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1992

Murder most foul when religious fundamentalists plan a time safari to disprove the theory of evolution.

 It will demonstrate that all these prehistoric beasts, whereof your clients bring home heads, hides, and photographs, did not live in succession, but all at the same time. 



Romance Time Travel of 1992

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
Outlander 2: Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon




No Time Travel.
Move along.
“Compound Interest” by Jim Heath, Eidolon, Spring 1992 [despite title, no time travel ]

“Atlantis” by Orson Scott Card, Grails, Oct 1992 [viewing the past ]

The Poof Point by Ellen Weiss and Mel Friedman, Nov 1992 [backward aging ]



  Reggie Rivers #6
“The Cayuse”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Expanse, 1993

Apparently, the parasaurolophus does not play well with certain 20th century technology.



  Reggie Rivers #7
“Pliocene Romance”
aka “Miocene Romance”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Analog, Jan 1993

How would an animal rights activist view the hunting of extinct species on Reggie’s time safaris?

 But the beasts my clients hunt on these time safaris are all long extinct anyway. Ending the safaris wouldnt bring any dinosaurs or mastodons back to life. 




   “The Battle of Long Island”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Omni, Feb/Mar 1993

Major Susan Peters is in charge of all the nurses at “The Hole” where a series of soldiers from alternative past Revolutionary Wars keep appearing.

 Theyre often like this. They find themsleves in an alien, impossible, unimaginable place, surround by guards with uniforms and weapons they dont recognize, and yet their first concern is not their personal fate but the battle they left behind. 




   Bradbury Comics’ “A Sound of Thunder”
adapted by Richard Corben
First publication: Ray Bradbury Comics 1, Feb 1993

In addition to reprinting Williamson’s 1954 adaptation, Ray Bradbury Comics 1 had a new 12-page adaptation by Richard Corben.

 My god! It could reach up and grab the moon. 




   Groundhog Day
by Danny Rubin and Harold Ramis (Ramis, director)
First release: 12 Feb 1993

A jaded weatherman, Phil Connors (no relation to John Connor), is in Punxsutawney to cover the Groundhog Day goings-on, continually repeating the day and—after losing his jaded edge—striving for Rita’s heart.

 Youre not a god. You can take my word for it: This is twelve years of Catholic school talking. 




   Army of Darkness
by Sam Raimi and Ivan Raimi (Sam Raimi, director)
First release: 19 Feb 1993

A Connecticut Yankee (or maybe Michigan) in King Arthur's Court meets the Living Dead and their kin.

 This is my boom-stick. Its a 12-guage, double barreled Remington—S-marts top-of-the-line. Youll find them in the Sporting Goods Department. 




   X-Men Cartoon
created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby
First time travel: 13 Mar 1993

Even though the 1992 cartoon had all them new-fangled X-Men and their funky costumes, I still got some enjoyment from the Kirby-designed villians, such as the Sentinels in the two-part time-travel story, “Days of Future Past” (which, not coincidentally, will also be the name of the upcoming X-Men movie). Well, they were sort of Kirby-designed: He penciled the cover and sketched the layouts of X-Men 14.

 We rebels have a theory: If the assasination of the 90s never occurred . . . 




   Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III:
Turtles in Time

adapted by Stuart Gillard (Gillard, director)
First release: 19 Mar 1993

Tim’s favorite reptiles (at age 8) moved from animated to live-action for the silver screen. For this third installment, the turtles’ human friend April swaps place with a 17th century Japanese prince, and the ninjas in a half shell head back to rescue her.

 Awesome! But do you think they had pizza back then? 




  Reggie Rivers #8
“The Mislaid Mastodon”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Analog, May 1993

Wait a minute! Didn’t Reggie lay down the law long ago that his time safaris can’t meddle in human times? So how’s he gonna bring back a Mastodon alive for his latest customer?



   “Just Like Old Times”
aka Seems Like Old Times
by Robert J. Sawyer
First publication: On Spec, Jun 1993

When serial killer Rudolph Cohen is convicted to die for his crimes, by transfering his consciousness into a previous nearly-dead being with no ability to control that being. He chooses a T. Rex. as the previous being, and it turns out that he can control it.

 We can project a human beings consciousness back in time, superimposing his or her mind overtop of that of someone who lived in the past. 




   Glimpses
by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Jul 1993

A weak marriage isn’t enough to sustain Ray Shackleford, but he doesn’t want to leave either, so he spends time in his mind wondering what various unmade albums would be like from the Beatles and other 60s bands (the Doors, the Beach Boys), and one day the music of those unmade albums starts coming from the speakers in his stereo repair shop.

 When I opened my eyes it was nighttime and I was crouched on the sidewalk in front of Brians house and it wasn't 1989 anymore. 




   12:01
by Richard Lupoff, Jonathan Heap, Richard Morton (Jack Sholder, director)
First aired: 5 Jul 1993 (made-for-tv)

Trapped in a one-day time loop, Barry Thomas tries to bring down the company that’s causing the loop, hopefully coming to a happy ending with the gorgeous scientist who runs the project.

 Barry: Oh my God. It’s twelve o’clock.
Lisa: No! We’ve got to do something!
Barry: There’s no time. Quick, tell me what your favorite color is. 




   The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr.
created by Jeffrey Boam and Carlton Cuse
First episode: 27 Aug 1993

In a steampunk old west, gunfighter Brisco County, Jr., and his sidekick Lord Bowler are hired to track down the maniacal time-traveler John Bly who, among other things, kills the senior Brisco County and seeks a powerful Orb from the future—plenty of excitement for the 27 episodes of its one season.

At least one Brisco time traveler from 5502 appears naked a la the terminator, but (as of 2015) Harlan Ellison hasn’t sue Brisco over the time-travel requirement.

 Brisco: Are you an angel? You look like an angel.
Karina: No. Im from the future. My name is Karina.
Brisco: And, uh, in the future youve kinda given up on clothes? 


   Time Machines: Time Travel in Physics, Metaphysics and Science Fiction
by Paul J. Nahin
First publication: Sep 1993

If you have only one reference book on your shelf—on any topic—this must be it. Get the second edition.

 This is, I believe, a book for the adventurous in spirit. 




   King Arthur and the Knights of Justice
created by Jean Chalopin
First episode: 13 Sep 1993

When the real King Arthur and his knights are put out of commission by the evil Morgana, Merlin brings a football player, Arthur King, and his teammates, the Knights, back as replacements for two seasons on this syndicated series.

 And then, from the field of the future, a new king will come to save the world of the past. 


   “The Girl with Some Kind of Past.
And George.”

by William Tenn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1993

A pretty, young time traveler from the future visits the most fascinating person she can think of in the past—that would be playboy George Rice, coincidentally her great-great-grandfather—but she won’t tell George what makes him so fascinating.

 That left the incest angle, and I asked him about that. He says that making it with your great-great-granddaughter from the twenty-first century is not much different from making it with your clothes-designer neighbor from across the hall. 




   Pinky and the Brain
created by Tom Ruegger and Steven Spielberg
First time travel: 6 Oct 1993

In their quest for world domination, the pair of gene-spliced lab mice traveled through time multiple times, both in their role as an Animaniacs guest feature and in their own series. Their jaunts include a visit to H.G. Wells and his time machine.

As with the Warners in other Animaniacs episodes, it’s not always clear whether Pinky and the Brain are traveling through time or merely acting out a drama set in a different time period. Such is life within four walls.
  1. Pavlov’s Mice, Animaniacs (6 Oct 1993)
  2. When Mice Ruled the Earth (H.G. Wells), Animaniacs (23 Oct 1993)
  3. Puppet Rulers, Animaniacs (12 Nov 1993)
  4. Don’t Tread on Us, Animaniacs (11 Nov 1995)
  5. Brain of the Future, Pinky and the Brain 8 Feb 1997)

 Greetings from a post-apocalyptic future. We have traveled back through time to bring you the answer to all of your problems. We are your future selves. 

——Brain of the Future




   Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog
created by Reed Shelly, Bruce Shelly, Phil Harnage and Kent Butterworth
First time travel: 26 Oct 1993

Video game character Sonic and his sidekick Tails repeatedly foil the evil Dr. Robotnik, including a four-part quest to the past where Robotnik seeks the four all-powerful chaos emeralds in the times of Blackbeard, King Arfur, Sonic’s ancestors and prehistory.
  1. Blackbot the Pirate (26 Oct 1993) to time of Blackbeard
  2. Hedgehog of the Hound Table (27 Oct 1993)    to time of King Arfur
  3. Robotnik’s Pyramid Scheme (28 Oct 1993) erasing Sonic’s family tree
  4. Prehistoric Sonic (29 Oct 1993) to caveman times and elsewhere

 I cant go through with this. My theories of time and space were developed for peace, not for your evil schemes. 




  Reggie Rivers #9
“The Honeymoon Dragon”
by L. Sprague de Camp
First publication: Rivers of Time, Nov 1993

Reggie Rivers must watch his back when he accepts an invitation from a journalist to track down a Megalania (kinda like a giant Komodo dragon) in the Quaternary period. This is the only new story in the 1993 Reggie Rivers Collection, Rivers of Time.



   The Silurian Tales
by Steven Utley
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1993

I’ve read ten of Utley’s stories of an expedition plopped into the Silurian geologic period, the most recent of which, “The End in Eden,” tells the tale of customs agents Phil Morrow and Sal Shelton, living at the border between the Silurian period and the present, matching wits with NCIS and JAG officers over a case of possible smuggling of Paleolithic biological specimens.
  1. There and Then (Nov 1993) Asimovs
  2. The Age of Mud and Slime (Mar 1996) Asimovs
  3. A Silurian Tale (May 1996) Asimovs
  4. The Wind Over the World (Oct/Nov 1996) Asimovs
  5. The Real World (30 Aug 2000) Sci Fiction
  6. Chain of Life (Oct/Nov 2000) Asimovs
  7. The Despoblado (22 Nov 2000) Sci Fiction
  8. Cloud by Van Gogh (Dec 2000) F&SF
  9. Half a Loaf (Jan 2001) Asimovs
  10. Five Miles from Pavement (21 Mar 2001) Sci Fiction
  11. The World Without (Jul 2001) Asimovs
  12. Walking in Circles (Jan 2002) Asimovs
  13. Treading the Maze (Feb 2002) Asimovs
  14. Foodstuff (Feb 2002) F&SF
  15. Beyond the Sea (29 Aug 2002) Revolution SF
  16. Exile (Aug 2003) Asimovs
  17. Chaos and Gods (18 Aug 2003) Revolution SF
  18. Invisible Kingdoms (Feb 2004) F&SF
  19. Babel (Mar 2004) Analog
  20. Another Continuum Heard From! (2 Apr 2004)   Revolution SF
  21. A Paleozoic Palimpsest (Oct 2004) F&SF
  22. The Wave-Function Collapse (Mar 2005) Asimovs
  23. Promised Land (Jul 2005) F&SF
  24. Silv’ry Moon (Oct/Nov 2005) F&SF
  25. Diluvium (May 2006) F&SF
  26. All of Creation (18 Jan 2008) Cosmos
  27. The World Within the World (Mar 2008) Asimovs
  28. The 400-Million-Year Itch (Apr 2008) F&SF
  29. Variant (Summer 2008) Postscripts
  30. The Woman Under the World (Jul 2008) Asimovs
  31. Slug Hell (Sep 2008) Asimovs
  32. Lost Places of Earth (Jan 2009) in We Think, Therefore We Are
  33. The Tortoise Grows Elate (Mar/Apr 2012) F&SF
  34. The End in Eden (Oct 2012) Analog
  35. The Gift Horse (Fall 2012) in The 400-Million-Year Itch
  36. Sidestep (Spring 2013) in Invisible Kingdoms

 Wheres he going to run to? Home is four hundred million miles away. 

—The End in Eden




   Philadelphia Experiment II
by Wallace C. Bennett, Don Jakoby, et. al. (Stephen Cornwell, director)
First release: 12 Nov 1993

At the end of the first movie, David Herdeg was left in 1983 America; ten years later, another experiment sends a nuclear bombed to 1943 Germany and David must go back to stop from creating a Nazi-ruled world.

 That plane got sucked back there. Landed in the heart of Nazi Germany. 




   Goodnight Sweetheart
created by Laurence Marks and Maurice Gran
First episode: 18 Nov 1993

Television repairman Gary Sparrow walks into a pub and meets a friendly barmaid in London during World War II, a spot where he repeatedly returns to escape a mundane life and loving but sometimes trying wife in 1993.

 Oh, I must say you might be takin’ this 1940s theme a bit too far. 




   We’re Back! A Dinosaur’s Story
adaptation by John Patrick Shanley
First release: 24 Nov 1993

Based on the children’s book of the same name, Rex tells the story of how he went from the Cretaceous to the modern-day golf course. The story is weak, but the animation and voices are better than the usual 90s fare.

 Greetings friends, and welcome to my shack. My name is Captain Neweyes, and I live in the far future where all the stars and all the planets have had to learn to get along. 




   Dilbert
by Scott Adams
First time travel: 19 Dec 1993

 Make sure nothing changes because of my visit or it will kill everyone in the future. 



Romance Time Travel of 1993

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
Outlander 3: Voyager by Diana Gabaldon

Tempest in Time by Eugenia Riley

Two Hearts in Time by Eugenia Riley

Stolen Brides 1: Forever His by Shelly Thacker




No Time Travel.
Move along.
Tomorrow Calling by Tim Leandro, 1993 [alternate timelines ]

Arcadia by Tom Stoppard, 13 Apr 1993 [parallel stories from different times ]

“The Four-Thousand-Year-Old Boy” by Lawrence Dyer, Interzone, Jul 1993 [immortality ]

Muddle Earth by John Brunner, Sep 1993 [long sleep ]

Demolition Man by Marco Brambilla, 8 Oct 1993 [long sleep ]

Blue Flame by Cassian Elwes (Elwes, director), Dec 1993 [no definite time travel ]



   “Another Story or
a Fisherman of the Inland Sea”

by Ursula K. Le Guin
First publication: A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994)

At 18, Hideo leaves his family and his planet, O, to become part of a group that invents instantaneous tranportation—a device that ends up taking him back to the time that he first left Planet O

 So: once upon a time when I was twenty-one years old I left my home and came on the NAFAL ship Terraces of Darranda to study at the Ekumenical Schools on Hain. 


   Help! I’m Trapped in the First Day of . . .
by Todd Strasser
First time travel: 1994 (Help! I’m Trapped in the First Day of School)

Most of Strasser’s 17 Help! books trap young Jake Sherman in the body of this or that adult (or dog), but two of the books have the boy repeating the day over and over (. . . in the First Day of School and . . . in the First Day of Summer Camp).

 It was the first day again! 




   “Women on the Brink of a Cataclysm”
by Molly Brown
First publication: Interzone, Jan 1994

Joanna, a successful sculptor in New York, agrees to be the traveler for her friend Toni’s time machine, but what neither of them knows is that any travel backward in time will start an avalanche of various artist Joannas going back and forth between alternate universes.

 “Even if youve found a way, Im not going back,” she said. “No way am I going back. Ever. This is my life now, my world, and I like it. Though . . .” She paused a moment, and her face—my face—crumpled into a mass of lines. Oh God, I thought, I dont look as old as her, do I? She blinked hard, several times, as if she was trying not to cry. “Hows Katie? Is she all right?” 




   “The Tourist”
by Paul Park
First publication: Interzone, Feb 1994

Once the time-travel tourist business gets going, there’s no stopping it, not to mention all those travelers who feel they have business with Hitler or Stalin—which brings about an interesting theory of time not being a continuum at all, all told through the personal lens of one recently divorced man who buys a ticket for Paleolithic Spain and sets out after his ex-wife.

 We just cant keep our hands off, and as a result, Cuba has invaded prehistoric Texas, the Empire of Ashok has become a Chinese client state, and Napoleon is in some kind of indirect communication with Genghis Khan. 




   The Quantum Physics of Time Travel
by David Deutsch and Michael Lockwood
First publication: Scientific American, Mar 1994

I propose that all writers of time travel fiction should be required to read certain articles, and this is the first. Deutsch and Lockwood do an admirable job of describing the well-known Grandfather Paradox and the lesser known paradox of the causal loop (in which, for example, an art critic brings a book of famous paintings back to the artist before the time when the paintings were painted, and this book then inspires those very paintings, leaving the question of who created the paintings).

The article then tries to unwind these paradoxes in classical physics, where there is but one universe. In this universe, a time traveler who returns to the past can do nothing except that which was already done. For example, the traveler simply cannot kill his or her own grandfather before Grandpa meets Grandma because we know (by the birth of the traveler) that that didn’t happen. So, something in the universe must stop the murder. Things must happen as they happened.

But, say Deutsch and Lockwood, this conspiracy of the universe to preserve consistency violates the Autonomy Principle, according to which “it is possible to create in our immediate environment any configuration of matter that the laws of physics permit locally, without reference to what the rest of the universe may be doing.” In other words, if it’s physically possible for the traveler to point a gun at Grandpa, then the fact that elsewhen in the universe Grandpa must knock up Grandma cannot interfere with the traveler’s ability to pull the trigger.

Deutsch and Lockwood use the Autonomy Principle to reject something, but it’s classical physics they reject, not time travel. In a similar way, for stories that rely on a Causal Loop Paradox, Deutsch and Lockwood ask: Just where did the original idea of the paintings come from? They reject that the paintings might have come from nowhere (TANSTAAFL!), and again they reject classical physics.

Personally, I hope that time travel writers don’t fully embrace the Autonomy Principle and TANSTAAFL, because I want more wonderful stories where, in fact, there is but one history of events, the future and past may both be fixed, free will is an illusion, and free lunches exist. Hooray for “—All You Zombies—”!

But with classical physics banned, what else is there? Deutsch and Lockwood turn to Everett’s Many Worlds model wherein each collapse of the quantum wave function results in a new universe. When a time traveler goes to the past, they say, the arrival of the traveler creates a new multiverse, and this multiverse does not need to act the same as the original. Grandpa can die! The artist can be given inspiration from an artist doppleganger in the original universe!

Noteably, though, Deutsch and Lockwood never discuss how time travel might cause the same kind of universe splitting as the collapse of the wave function, but never mind. What they do discuss is how the new universe must respond to changes, and many stories where changing the past is possible fall down on this account. For example, if you change the past so that the reason for your trip to the past no longer exists, then when you return to the present you should find a new version of yourself who never considered traveling to the past. Multiverse time travelers should read this article just to understand that the present they return to may very well have another versin of themselves. Two Marty McFlies!

One final note: Of course we don’t live in a classical physics universe. That's clear from the many experiments that support quantum physics. But living in a quantum world doesn’t immediately imply Many Worlds. Could time travel exist in a single quantum universe? Or does it? For thoughts on that, check out the online “Scientific American article “Time Travel Simulation Resolves Grandfather Paradox” by Lee Billings.

 In the art critic story, quantum mechanics allows events, from the participants perspective, to occur much as Dummett describes. The universe that the critic comes from must have been one in which the artist did, eventually, learn to paint well. In that universe, the pictures were produced by creative effort, and reproductions were later taken to the past of another universe. There the paintings were Indeed plagiarized—if one can be said to plagiarize the work of another version of oneself—and the painter did get \“some- thing for nothing.” But there is no para- dox, because now the existence of the pictures was caused by genuine creative effort, albeit in another universe. 




   Time Chasers
aka Tangents
by David Giancola (Giancola, director)
First release: 17 Mar 1994

Before watching this movie (about amateur inventor Nick Miller’s time machine in a two-prop plane and the evil corporation that tries to take it over), I never realized that the word “unwatchable” had degrees. Of course, the movie itself is unwatchable, but in a genuinely inoffensive, cultish way; the self-absorbed add-on commentary from the Mystery Science Theater 3000 hosts who presented it in 1997 on early-morning tv is categorically unwatchable.

 You brought us up here this morning to look at your—time machine?! 




  Time Traders #5
Firehand
by Andre Norton and P.M. Griffin
First publication: Jun 1994

So how do you battle a powerful, time-traveling alien race who visited Earth in the far distant past? Ross Murdoch has the right idea: You go back in time yourself to set up a resistance in the Dominion of Virgin civilazation, which was wiped out by the murderous, bald aliens. And you get yourself a love interest.

 . . . she kissed him joyfully. 




   Boys’ Life’s The Time Machine
adapted by Seymour Reit and Ernie Colon
First publication: Boys’ Life, Jun 1994

Nearly a century after the original publication of Wells’s tale, author Seymour Reit and artist Ernie Colon faithfully the comic book version up to date. The art was enjoyable, but to me, the traveller’s connection with Weena is downplayed in exchange for werewolfish Morlocks.

 After much study Ive discovered that we can travel through time just as we travel through space . . . 




   Babylon 5
created by J. Michael Straczynski
First time travel: 10 Aug 1994

In the 23rd century, a space station serves as a crossroads for humans, aliens, and science fiction tropes including, of course, time travel.

I was never drawn into this program in the way I was for Next Generation, Voyager, and even DS9. I think that’s partly because of weak dialog and acting and also, for me, the cast of characters never created interrelationships that felt like a family.
  1. Babylon Squared (10 Aug 1994) Babylon 4 unstuck in time
  2. Comes the Inquisitor (25 Oct 1995) man from 1888 London
  3. War Without End (13-20 May 1996) back to Babylon 4

 This is nuts! A station doesnt just disappear and then reappear four years later like some kind of Flying Dutchman. 

—“Babylon Squared”






   The Magic School Bus
by Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen
First time travel: 8 Sep 1994

In The Magic School Bus in the Time of the Dinosaurs, Miss Frizzle and her charges turn the bus into a time machine that takes them to the Triassic, the Jurassic, and the Cretaceous. The bus had several other adventures in time, too, although not all by Cole and Degen.
  1. Dinosaur Detectives (2002) Chapter Book 9
  2. At the First Thanksgiving by Joanna Cole
  3. Builds the Statue of Liberty by Anne Capeci
  4. Flies with Dinosaurs by Martin Schwabacher
  5. Ancient Egypt (2001) Mrs. Frizzle 1
  6. Medieval Castle (2003) Mrs. Frizzle 2
  7. Imperial China (2005) Mrs. Frizzle 3

 Class, were in the late triassic period—the time of the early dinosaurs! 




   Timecop
by Mark Verheiden (Peter Hyams, director)
First release: 14 Sep 1994

When I was a teen, my friends and I (hi Dan and Paul) produced a fanzine called Free Fall. What’s that got to do with Timecop? For a short time, I was part of a group called APA 5, which Paul introduced me to. We would all send our fanzines to a central location, where they would be collated and the resulting giant fanzine sent back to each of us—one of whom was the eventual Hollywood writing success, Mark Verheiden. Oh, and in this movie, Time Enforcement Commission agent Van Damme goes back in time to blow lots of stuff up in hopes of saving his already-blown-up wife.

 I cant tell you anything. Hell send somebody back to wipe out my grandparents. Itll be like Ive never existed. My mother, my father, my wife, my kids, my fucking cat. 




   The Simpsons
created by Matt Groening
First time travel: 30 Oct 1994

Homer’s first time travel was part of the fifth Halloween montage in a segment called “Time and Punishment” (aka “Homer’s Time Travel Nightmare”) where each tiny dinosaur he stomps on alters his own life. The next bit I saw was Professor Frink, who built and used the chronotrike in “Springfield Up,” attempting to tell his young self to choose a different career.
  1. Treehouse of Horror V (30 Oct 1994) Butterfly Effect spoof
  2. Springfield Up (18 Feb 2007) Frink’s chronotrike
  3. Treehouse of Horror XXIII (7 Oct 2012)    Back to the Future spoof

 Homer: [to self] Okay, dont panic! Remember the advice Dad gave you on your wedding day.
Grandpa: [in flashback] If you ever travel back in time, dont step on anything, because even the slightest change can alter the future in ways you cant imagine. 




   Dog City
produced by Jim Henson Productions
First time travel: 12 Nov 1994

This combined animation/muppet show from Jim Hensen Productions gets an extra half star just because the main characters are all dogs, one of who explains how a time machine has completely altered Dog City in the episode “Future Schlock’ (12 Nov 1994).

 Due to the use of a time machine, events were changed in Dog City’s past, which naturally affected Dog City’s future, which was Dog City’s present, of course. 


   A.J.’s Time Travelers
by Barry Friedman (Mike Finney, director)
First episode: 3 Dec 1984

In the four episodes of this Fox Network Saturday morning show, teenaged Commander A.J. Malloy leads a crew through horribly written educational trips through time including visits to Imhotep, Newton, Gutenberg and the Tuskegee Airmen, Salem, Santa, and more.

I wish I knew more about when this aired. The first episode was definitely “Imhotep&rdquo,; since that is where A.J. meets his crew; it might have aired as early as 3 Dec 1984.

 Having a conversation with a dog in a time machine and you think something can be impossible? 



Romance Time Travel of 1994

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
Remembrance by Jude Deveraux

When Lightning Strikes by Kristin Hannah

Mariana by Susanna Kearsley




No Time Travel.
Move along.
Dragonriders of Pern #12: The Dolphins of Pern by Anne McCaffrey, Oct 1994 [no time travel ]



   天は赤い河のほとり (Series)
English title: The Red River Series, aka Anatolia Story (translated from Japanese)
by Chie Shinohara
First chapter: Sho̅jo Comic, 1995

Shortly after her first kiss, fifteen-year-old Yuri is transported back to the Hittite Empire in ancient Anatolia where she becomes involved in royal intrigue.

The adventure was originally published in sixty chapters of Sho̅jo Comic starting in early 1995. The chapters were collected into 28 volumes for book publication, also starting in 1995. For me, it’s unique enough that I’ll break the rule of no-post-1969 comic book time travel.

Please send me a note if you know the date of the first Sho̅jo, or better yet, please send a scan of the cover!

 This place looks like the prop room for the Trojan War. 




Tim’s stash, still in the garage.

   The Goosebumps Books
by R.L. Stine
First time travel: Jan 1995

Tim was seven when the Goosebumps books first arrived, the perfect age to be creeped out by R.L. Stine (although Tim preferred the Animorphs). At least three of the original series had some time travel, as did many of the later Give Yourself Goosebumps books. Much of the time travel in those choose-your-own-adventure style of books occurred in alternative endings.
  1. A Night in Terror Tower (Jan 1995) Goosebumps 27
  2. The Cuckoo Clock of Doom (Feb 1995) Goosebumps 28
  3. Escape from the Carnival of Horrors (Jul 1995) G.Y.G. 1
  4. Tick Tock, You’re Dead (Nov 1995) G.Y.G. 2
  5. Trapped in Bat Wing Hall (Dec 1995) G.Y.G. 3
  6. The Knight in Screaming Armor (Sep 1996) G.Y.G. 9
  7. Vampire Breath (Nov 1996) Goosebumps 49
  8. Deep in the Jungle of Doom (Nov 1996) G.Y.G. 11
  9. Scream of the Evil Genie (Jan 1997) G.Y.G. 13
  10. The Twisted Tale of Tiki Island (Sep 1997) G.Y.G. 21
  11. Return to the Carnival of Horror (Oct 1997) G.Y.G. 22
  12. Return to Terror Tower (May 1998) G.Y.G. Special 2
  13. Revenge of the Body Squeezers (Jun 1999) G.Y.G. Special 6
  14. Into the Twistor of Terror (Aug 1999) G.Y.G. 38
  15. Danger Time (Jan 2000) G.Y.G. 41
  16. Heads You Lose! (May 2010) Horrorland 15

 It must have been my wish, I thought.
My birthday wish.
After Tara tripped me and I fell on my cake, I wished I could go back in time and start my birthday all over again.
Somehow my wish came true.
Wow! I thought. This is kind of cool.
 






   Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller
First time travel: 2 Jan 1995

Seven seasons with nine time-travel episodes including the most troublesome “Trials and Tribble-ations.”
  1. Past Tense I/II (2/9 Jan 1995) back 300 years
  2. Visionary (2 Feb 1995) jump forward several hours
  3. The Visitor (9 Oct 1995) Sisko skips through timelines
  4. Little Green Men (13 Nov 1995) to 1947 Roswell
  5. Accession (26 Feb 1996) Akorem, a poet from 200 years past
  6. Trials and Tribble-ations (4 Nov 1996) take a good guess
  7. Children of Time (5 May 1997) Defiant crew visit their descendants
  8. Wrongs Darker than Death . . . (1 Apr 1998)    Kira back to mother’s time

 We do not discuss it with outsiders. 

—Worf in “Trials and Tribble-ations”






   Star Trek: Voyager
created by Rick Berman, Michael Piller and Jeri Taylor
First time travel: 30 Jan 1995

Seven seasons with 12 time-travel episodes, two of which featured Kess’s namesake, Kes.
  1. Time and Again (30 Jan 1995) back one day to save a planet
  2. Eye of the Needle (20 Feb 1995) contact an old Romulan ship
  3. Future’s End I/II (13/20 Nov 1996) back to 1900s via 2900 AD technology
  4. Before and After (9 Apr 1997) Kes skips through her life
  5. Year of Hell I/II (5/12 Nov 1997) Krenim temporal ship
  6. Timeless (18 Nov 1998) 15 years in the future
  7. Relativity (12 May 1999) Seven becomes a time cop
  8. Fury (3 May 2000) Kes wants to change her past
  9. Shattered (17 Jan 2001) Chakotay steps between times
  10. Endgame (23 May 2001) future Voyager hatches a plan

 As they say in the Temporal Mechanics Department: Theres no time like the present. 


   From Time to Time
by Jack Finney
First publication: Feb 1995

Finney’s sequel to Time and Again initially finds Si Morley living a happy life in the 19th century with his 19th century family, while The Project in the future never even got started because he prevented the inventor’s parents from ever meeting. But vague memories linger in some of the Project member’s minds, and Morley can’t stay put.

 Theyre back there in the past, trampling around, changing things, aren t they? They dont know it. Theyre just living their happy lives, but changing small events. Mostly trivial, with no important effects. But every once in a while the effect of some small changed event moves on down to the&mdash 






   Lois and Clark
created by Deborah Joy LeVine
First time travel: 26 Mar 1995

Four seasons with 7 time-travel episodes:
  1. Tempus Fugitive (26 Mar 1995) to 1966 (H.G. Wells, Tempus)
  2. And the Answer Is . . . (21 May 1995) time traveler’s diary (Tempus)
  3. Tempus Anyone? (21 Jan 1996) future alternate universe, Tempus
  4. Soul Mates (13 Oct 1996) back to prevent a curse
  5. ’Twas the Night before Mxymas (15 Dec 1996)    Christmas Eve time loop
  6. Meet John Doe (2 Mar 1997) future Tempus runs for president
  7. Lois and Clarks (9 Mar 1997) future Tempus traps Clark

 Lois, did you know that in the future you're revered at the same level as Superman? Why, there are books about you, statues, an interactive game—youre even a breakfast cereal. 




   The Outer Limits (2nd Series)
created by Leslie Stevens
First episode: 5 May 1995

Sadly, this revival (which outlasted the original by more than 100 episodes) was shown mostly on cable, so I didn’t see many of the first airings. But as I was writing up this listing, I realized that between the two runs of The Outer Limits, three runs of The Twilight Zone, one season of Tales of Tomorrow, and a handful of other miscellaneous episodes of weird anthology series, we could easily put together a full season of a new anthology show: The Time Travel Zone Limts. After one season, the network will be ours, and we can continue for many happy seasons into the future.
  1. Virtual Future (5 May 1995) time travel or v.r.?
  2. Stitch in Time (14 Jan 1996) murderer with a time machine
  3. Falling Star (30 Jun 1996) pop music fan from the future
  4. Vanishing Act (21 Jul 1996) aliens unintentionally time travel
  5. Tribunal (14 May 1999) to Nazi concentration camps (Prentice)
  6. Breaking Point (18 Feb 2000) time traveler to wife’s death
  7. Decompression (30 Jun 2000) time traveler vs. politician
  8. Gettysburg (28 Jul 2000) to U.S. Civil War (Prentice)
  9. Time to Time (11 Aug 2001) woman to father’s death (Prentice)
  10. Final Appeal (3 Sep 2000) Stitch in Time continuation
  11. Patient Zero (23 Mar 2001) attempt to prevent deadly virus
  12. Abduction (18 Aug 2001) teens vs alien (with 2s of time travel)

 There is nothing wrong with your television. Do not attempt to adjust the picture. We are now controlling the transmission. We control the horizontal and the vertical. We can deluge you with a thousand channels or expand one single image to crystal clarity and beyond. We can shape your vision to anything our imagination can conceive. For the next hour, we will control all that you see and hear. You are about to experience the awe and mystery which reaches from the deepest inner mind to . . . The Outer Limits! 




   The Langoliers
adapted by Tom Holland
First aired: 14-15 May 1995 (made-for-tv)

As in Stephen King’s novella of the same name, this two-night made-for-tv movie follows the ten people who find that they’re the only ones left on board a transcontinental flight. Even after they land, nobody else is on the ground. In order of importance, the movie’s about (1) the characters, (2) horror, and (3) a little speculative fiction. In the end, the resolution involving time is the same as in the book.

 Ive been sitting here, running all these old stories through my head, you know: time warps, space warps, alien raiding parties. I mean, we really dont know if theres anything left down there, do we? 




   A Young Connecticut Yankee
in King Arthur’s Court

by Frank Encarnacao and Ralph L. Thomas (Thomas, director)
First aired: 27 May 1995 (made-for-tv)

Michael York plays Merlin to teenage rock-and-roll hopeful Hank Morgan is zapped back to the round table Mark-Twain-style by a wonky speaker.

 Lancelot? This is awesome. 


   “Time’s Revenge”
by Pauline Ashwell
First publication: Analog, Jun 1995

A housewife has a chance encounter with a time-traveler who deals in ancient artifacts, after which the two of them have time-to-time encounters.

 I had not realised how important the Time Travelers visits had become in my pleasant, prosperous, humdrum existence. 




   Wendy’s 3D Color Classics’
The Time Machine

adapted by Neal Adams
First publication: third issue of 1995, Summer 1995

My strongest memory of Neal Adams comes from his artwork and plotting for the final eleven issues of the original X-Men. By that time, I felt that Marvel was in decline, but The Strangest Teens of All! still had my attention even if they didn’t yet have time travel. Much later, Adams adapted Wells’s famous tale in a 3D mini-comic giveaway for Wendy’s kids’ meals in a style that’s remniscent of his early 1970s work on Tower of Shadows.

In addition to the wonderful Neal Adams art, I’m also intrigued by the ChromaDepth® 3D glasses in which different wavelengths are shifted left or right a differing amount in the two eyepieces to create a 3D effect. If I understand it right, this means that Adams could draw the comic normally, and the 3D effect is added in the coloring process.

 This exciting comic can be read as is or with the new type of 3-D glasses provided. Look through the lens and you’ll see full color pictures turn into dazzling 3-D right before your eyes! 




   The Time-Traveling Terraformers
by Pauline Ashwell
First story: Analog, Aug 1995

Sandy Jennings, an orphan and a red-headed Ph.D. student in microbiology, is recruited into a terraforming project by a group of several hundred time travelers who work in a loosely defined, non-authoritarian structure that spans years of their lifetimes and eons of the planet’s time. Sandy is not seen in the third and fourth stories, which show nick-of-time recruitments of vulcanologist Simon Hardacre and plankton expert Haru.

I liked these last two stories, especially the character of Haru, but I longed for more development beyond what Sandy had already shown us of their common universe.
  1. Hunted Head (Aug 1995) Analog
  2. One Thousand Years (May 2000)    Analog
  3. Out of Fire (Mar 2001) Analog
  4. Elsewhere (Jun 2001) Analog

 Knowledge, absolute and definite knowledge of the future as it affects yourself, is never any use. Whether it is bad or good, you cannot do anything that will change it. It simply takes away your power to decide. 




   A Kid in King Arthur’s Court
by Michael Part and Robert L. Levy (Michael Gottlieb, diretor)
First release: 11 Aug 1995

This time around, the Yankee is failed little-leaguer Calvin Fuller who’s pulled back to Camelot where we see him with a flashlight, a Walkman, roller blades, superglue, a mountain bike with training wheels, bubble gum, karate, a candy bar, a Swiss Army knife, an aging Arthur and a pretty young princess.

 Swiss Army knife! The very name conjurs up greatness! 




   “The Chronology Protection Case”
by Paul Levinson
First publication: Analog, Sep 1995

When six of seven physicists (plus one pretty wife) in a time-travel research group meet untimely ends, forensic examiner Phil D’Amato suspects that a paradox-paranoid universe is looking out for itself.

 The drive back to Westchester was harrowing. Two cars nearly side swiped me, and one big-ass truck stopped so suddenly in front of me that I had all I could do to swerve out of crashing into it and becoming an instant Long Island Expressway pancake. 






   Star Trek: Gargoyles
created by Greg Weisman
First time travel: 14 Sep 1995

What’s that? You didn’t realize that Tim’s favorite childhood cartoon was part of the Star Trek universe? And I suppose you also believe that Doc Brown had nothing to do with Brownian motion?! According to the creator, this universe has a fixed time line in which you may travel but not change things—what he calls “working paradoxes,” though my memory holds only one time-travel episode, “Vows” (14 Sep 1995).

 You may have prevented me from altering the past, but you failed too. You see I have clear memories of your little inspirational about keeping my vows of love. I never forgot it. Obviously history is immutable. 




   The Magic School Bus
created by Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen
First time travel: 23 Sep 1995

Apart from “The Busasaurus,” in which The Magic School Bus in the Time of Dinosaurs comes to the little animated screen (although only with the Cretaceous period), I don’t know whether Miss Frizzle and her charges ever took any other trips through time.

 To really understand a dinosaur, you really need to walk in its shoes. 




   Mirror, Mirror
created by Poise Graeme-Evans
First episode: 30 Sep 1995

Troubled 14-year-old Jo Tiegan is given a mirror that lets her visit back-and-forth with another girl who lives in her very bedroom in 1919 New Zealand.

 I was just positioning the mirror for your daughter. . . . Jo, you must leave it right there. Its right for it to be there. By tomorrow morning, youll understand. 




   Josh Kirby Movies
aka Josh Kirby . . . Time Warrior
first movie by Paul Callisi, Ethan Reiff and Cyrus Voris (Ernest D. Farino, director)
First movie: 24 Oct 1995

Fourteen-year-old boy Josh Kirby teams with alien girl Azabeth Siege to have world-saving vhs adventures in time.
  1. Chapter 1, Planet of the Dino-Knights (24 Oct 1995)
  2. Chapter 2, The Human Pets (31 Oct 1995)
  3. Chapter 3, Trapped on Toyworld (21 Nov 1995)
  4. Chapter 4, Eggs from 70 Million B.C. (19 Dec 1995)
  5. Chapter 5, Journey to the Magic Cavern (16 Apr 1996)
  6. Chapter 6, Last Battle for the Universe (21 May 1996)

 Irwin 1138: Luckily, I had just perfected a chrono-displacement device capable of launching inanimate objects into the fourth dimension.
Josh: Wait! You invented a time machine?
Irwin 1138: Isnt that just what I said? 




   Goosebumps TV Show
developed by Deborah Forte
First time travel: 3 Nov 1995

R.L. Stine’s creepy kids’ books translated to tv, but for me, the pace on the small screen was always slow. A couple episodes had definite time travel, and some of the episodes were filmed in Bellevue, WA, where I went to junior high school, but I haven’t recognized any landmarks.
  1. The Cuckoo Clock of Doom (3 Nov 1995) redo birthday
  2. A Night in Terror Tower (25 Feb 1996) English castle

 So Tara has never been born. I suppose there’s some way to go back in time to get her, right? I guess I probably ought to do that. And I will . . . one of these days. 

—“The Cuckoo Clock of Doom”






   Star Truck: Animaniacs
by Earl Kress (Audi Paden, director)
First publication: 4 Nov 1995

The Warner kids beam onto the Star Truck ship in the year 2995 where Captain Mr Spork, Squattie, and the rest of the gang don’t realize that they are a mid-twentieth century tv show.

If you don’t get knocked out by the giant Star Truck hammer, you’ll briefly spot Pinky and the Brain in this satire. That pair had their own chronoatypical adventures in separate episodes of Animaniacs and their own show.

N.B. the Warners often visited movie or tv sets in different times in which it wasn’t clear whether the other characters knew that they were actors in a dramatical production. In Star Truck the Warners could well be in the future, but in other episodes (e.g., Hercules Unwound, which costars Pinky and the Brain), the fourth wall is shattered.

 Yakko: Come on, Cap, lets go back to New York in the 1930s.
Dot: You can fall in love with Joan Collins—
Yakko: —and then shell die. 




   Wishbone
created by Peter Orton and Ellia Den
First time travel: 7 Nov 1995

Wishbone, our favorite imaginative dog, is an different literary adventurer during every episode, including one scarey 1995 tale (“Bark to the Future”) where he became the traveller. The kids loved this show, especially Hannah (and me).

 This is the problem with time. I’m hungry now, but snack time is later. Why can’t later be now? 



Romance Time Travel of 1995

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
Time Travelers 1: Both Sides of Time by Caroline B. Cooney

Pirates by Linda Lael Miller

Timeswept Bride by Eugenia Riley

A Tryst in Time by Eugenia Riley

Awaken, My Love by Robin Schone




No Time Travel.
Move along.
Indian Ink by Tom Stoppard, 27 Feb 1995 [parallel stories from different times ]

“Once and Future” by Mercedes Lackey, Excalibur, May 1995 [reincarnation ]

Time Travel Through the Bible by Arden Albrecht and Don Hall, 23 Oct 1995 [despite title, no time travel ]



   The Busy World of Richard Scarry
created by Richard Scarry
First time travel: 1996



In one Busytown episode, two of Richard Scarry’s cheerful characters, Huckle Cat and Lowly Worm, are accidentally taken back to Colonial Busytown by Mr. Fix-It’s Tardis-like time machine. Fortunately, Mr. Fix-It’s ancestor helps them fix the broken lever in the time machine (even before today’s Mr. Fix-It can rescue them in another familiar looking time machine).

 This isnt any old elevator, boys. Its a time machine! This is for traveling through time. 




   Dinosaur Valley Girls
by Donald F. Glut (Glut, director)
First release: circa 1996

Afterction-movie hero Tony Markham is tossed by a magic talisman into a time of dinosaurs, cavemen, and sex-starved cavewomen who shave their legs with clam shells (including one named Buf-Fee). Someday I must decide whether movies with simultaneous dinosaurs and cavemen can be classified as time travel or must always be relegated to mere fantasy.

 That skull you saw, those slabs and more, are all carbon-dated at less than a million years old. My only explanation is that there once existed a place I call Dinosaur Valley, where unknown forces somehow brought together creatures from different times and places. 




   “A Note from the Future”
by Cathy Camper
First publication: Wired, Jan 1996

Wired prints a handwritten note from the future.

 HA HA Wish they cold truly see how futur isrelly. 




   12 Monkeys
by David Peoples and Janet Peoples (Terry Gilliam, director)
First release: 5 Jan 1996

In the year 2035 with the world devastated by an artificially engineered plague, convict James Cole is sent back in time to gather information about the plague’s origin so the scientists can figure out how to fight it.

 And what we say is the truth is what everybody accepts. Right, Owen? I mean, psychiatry: its the latest religion. We decide whats right and wrong. We decide whos crazy or not. Im in trouble here. Im losing my faith. 




   Pastwatch: The Redemption of
Christopher Columbus

by Orson Scott Card
First publication: 1996

Diko, a second-generation researcher in a project that observes the past, discovers that it’s actually possible to send objects to the past and that a previous timeline did just this to alter Christopher Columbus’s fate; now, Diko and two others propose a further alteration that involves three travelers going to the 15th century.

 All of history was available, it seemed, and yet Pastwatch had barely scratched the surface of the past, and most watchers looked forward to a limitless future of rummaging through time. 


   Johnny and the Bomb
by Terry Pratchett
First publication: Apr 1996

In this third book of the series, teenaged Johnny Maxwell and his yahoo friends uses Mrs. Tachyon’s shopping trolley to travel through time to World War II.

  . . . if you go mad, do you know youve gone mad? If you dont, how do you know youre not mad? 




   Duckman
created by Everett Peck
First time travel: 20 Apr 1996

Seinfeld’s pal, George Costanza, lends his voice to private detective, lousy family man, and general lech Eric Tiberius Duckman, who in one amusing episode was visited by multiple future selfs warning him of multiple future mistakes.

 Actually, it seems that while trying to set the alarm on my clock radio, I may have ripped a hole in the time-space continuum. 

—Ajax in “The Once and Future Duck”




   Dexter’s Laboratory
created by Genndy Tartakovsky
First time travel: 28 Apr 1996

Boy Genius Dexter makes amazing invention after amazing invention including a time machine that his annoying sister Dee Dee first used in the first episode, “DeeDeemensional.” I enjoyed the way it ended.
  1. Deedeemensional (28 Apr 1996)    Dee Dee goes back an hour
  2. Ego Trip (10 Dec 1999) destroys terminator robots and visits future

 If there were a message that was so important it required time travel, I certainly would not send my idiot sister. 

—Dexter to Dee Dee in “Deedeemensional”


   “Time Travelers Never Die”
by Jack McDevitt
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1996

Dave Dryden and his pal Shel have a great life traveling through time, visiting with Napolean and DaVinci, until Shel dies. Or does he?

I was lucky enough to meet Jack McDevitt at Jim Gunn’s workshop in Lawrence. He was always encouraging, kind, insightful and upbeat—for me, the best of the resident writers at the workshop.

 Time travel should not be possible in a rational universe. 




   Early Edition
created by Bob Brush
First episode: 28 Sep 1996

A calico cat brings Gary tomorrow’s newspaper every morning—and at least two episodes in the four seasons sent softspoken Gary back in time (to the Chicago Fire in “Hot Time in the Old Time” and to the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre in “Everybody Goes to Rick’s). Go Gary!

One of the reasons this show appealed to me is the occurrence of a strong, introverted lead character, which is a rarity in all fiction.

 What if, by some magic, you found the power to really change things? People, events, maybe even your life. Would you even know where to start? Maybe you can’t know. Until it happens. 




   Richie Rich Cartoon
by Gary Conrad, Robert Schecter and Alicia Marie Schudt
First time travel: 5 Oct 1996

In the 1962 Richie Rich comic book, the poor little rich kid had an actual time machine, but in the 1996 cartoon (“Back in the Saddle”), he and Gloria just find themselves back in the old west with no machinations needed, where they meet Reggie the Kid.

 Richie, look at the date! June 1896! 




   Star Trek: First Contact
by Gene Roddenberry, Rick Berman, et. al. (Jonathan Frakes, director)
First release: 22 Nov 1996

Picard and the Enterprise travel back to 2063 to stop the Borg from preventing Zefram Cochrane’s invention of the warp drive.

 Assimilate this! 


   “Crossing into the Empire”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: David Copperfield’s Beyond Imagination, Dec 1996

Mulreany is a trader who travels back to 14th century Byzantium with Coca-Cola and other treats.

 One glance and Mulreany has no doubt that the version of the capital that has arrived on this trip is the twelfth-century one. 




   Merlin’s Shop of Mystical Wonders
by Kenneth J. Berton (Berton, director)
First release: a forgetable day in 1996

A grandfather tells his grandson two stories about Merlin coming to the present day to set up the eponymous mystical shop. Other than that, though, no time traveling.

 Grandpa: You know, actually, that toy monkey reminds me of a story I once wrote for television. Lets see, what was it? Of course: Merlin!
Grandkid: Merlin?
Grandpa: Merlin the sorcerer. Only it didnt take place in the time with King Arthur. You see, Merlin used his powers to come to our time, to set up a shop of mystical wonders for all to see. 



Romance Time Travel of 1996

Bodice rips are a more workaday mode of time travel than time ships.
Time Travelers 2: Out of Time by Caroline B. Cooney

Legend by Jude Deveraux

Outlander 4: Drums of Autumn by Diana Gabaldon

When There Is Hope by Jane Goodger

Creole 1: Frankly, My Dear by Sandra Hill

A Dance through Time by Lynn Kurland

Lennox 1: Breath of Magic by Theresa Medeiros

Phantom in Time by Eugenia Riley




No Time Travel.
Move along.
Timelock by Joseph John Barmettler and J. Reifel [long sleep ]

“Note from the Future” by Ray Vukcevich, Wired, Jan 1996 [no definite time travel ]

Hellraiser IV: Bloodline by Peter Atkins (Kevin Yagher, director), 8 Mar 1996 [long life ]

Dragonriders of Pern #13: Red Star Rising by Anne McCaffrey, Aug 1996 [no time travel ]
aka Dragonseye



   Retroactive
by M. Hamilton-Wright, R. Strauss and P. Badger (Louis Morneau, director)
First release: 1 Jan 1997

Kylie keeps going back to the same time in order to stop a psycho killer who has almost as many lives as a Terminator.

 This is about you takin’ hold of your life, codependent no more. 




   Future War
by David Hue and Dom Magwilli (Anthony Doublin, director)
First release: 28 Jan 1997

There’s only one scenario better than having a human slave escaping from the cyborgs of the future and being tracked across present-day Earth by dinosaurs from the past: having all that plus being lampooned on Mystery Science Theater 3000.

 From the future traveled a master race of Cyborgs. They made abductions from Earths past. The dinosaurs were trained as trackers. The humans were bred as slaves. Now a runaway slave escapes to a place his people call heaven . . . we know it as Earth. 






   The Company Stories
by Kage Baker and Kathleen Bartholomew
First story: Asimov’s, Mar 1997

I’ve read five of Kage Baker’s highly acclaimed stories about a group of entrepreneurial time travelers from the 24th century, the first of which was “Noble Mold” in Mar 1977. Of those, my favorite was “The Likely Lad” about young Alec Checkerfield, abandoned by his blue-blood parents to be raised by the hired help; he longs for adventure on the high seas, which he does obtain—but to be honest, I didn’t think it was via time travel. (Perhaps none of the five Checkerfield stories have time travel, even though isfdb indicates that they’re set in the Company Universe; I shall have to read “The Likely Lad” again!).

In 2012, the first of the Company stories co-authored with Kathleen Bartholomew appeared.

 For a while I lived in this little town by the sea. Boy, it was a soft job. Santa Barbara had become civilized by then: no more Indian rebellions, no more pirates storming up the beach, nearly all the grizzly bears gone. Once in a while some bureaucrat from Mexico City would raise hell with us, but by and large the days of the old Missions were declining into forlorn shades, waiting for the Yankees to come. 






   Files of the Time Rangers
by Richard Bowes
First story: Bending the Landscape: Fantasy, Mar 1997

I’ve read several of the Time Rangers’ stories, including “Straight to My Lover”s Heart’, in which a ranger named Raz (aka Cupid) takes two time-traveling children under his wings—not literal wings, although they could well have been, given the stories’ backdrop of ancient meddling gods.
  1. In the House of the Man in the Moon (Mar 1997) in Bending the Landscape
  2. Diana in the Spring (Aug 1998) F&SF
  3. From the Files of the Time Rangers (6 Sep 2000) Sci Fiction
  4. Straight to My Lover’s Heart (Summer 2001) Black Gate
  5. The Quicksilver Kid (17 Jan 2001) Sci Fiction
  6. The Ferryman’s Wife (May 2001 ) F&SF
  7. Days Red and Green (14 Nov 2001) Sci Fiction
  8. The Mask of the Rex (May 2002) F&SF
  9. Godfather Death (23 Oct 2002) Sci Fiction
  10. From the Files of the Time Rangers (2005) fix-up novel

 Razs specialty is outcasts of Time. Runaways. Fugitives. Ones who cant go home on holidays, because home hasnt been built yet. Or its a place that's long gone or never was. 




   Crime Traveller
created by Anthony Horowitz
First episode: 1 Mar 1997

Unconventional detective Jeff Slade becomes even more unconventional when cute nerd Holly Turner reveals the limited time machine left to her by her lost-in-time father.

 If something has happened, it will happen. 




   Alien Voices Presents:
The Time Machine

adapted by Nat Sagaloff
First publication: two casettes, 1 Apr 1997

Tim had several of the Alien Voices dramatizations which featured the voices of Leonard Nimoy (Spock) and John de Lancie (Q) in classics such as Wells’s The Time Machine. The traveller, called John, was voiced by Nimoy.

 The Traveller: What we call civilization is little more than the history of war interrupted by uncertain moments of peace. Surely mankind aspires to something greater than that.
Filby: Yes, but what does this have to do with geometry, John?’
The Traveller: Everything, Filby, everything.  


   The Loose Ends Stories
by Paul Levinson
First story: Analog, May 1997

Time traveler and history meddler Jeff Harris aims for the 1980s to prevent the Challenger explosion, but instead finds himself in the time of JFK, meets the love of his life, meets other time travelers, toys with the idea of assassinating Nixon and Andropov, and eventually does alter Challenger’s history with unintended consequences for the Soviet Union.
  1. Loose Ends (May 1997) Analog
  2. Little Differences (Jun 1998)    Analog
  3. Late Lessons (Oct 1999) Analog

 Do you think that, if someone had a mind to do it—if someone really wanted to and had the connections—that someone back in 1982 to 1984 could have forced Andropov from office—could have replaced him with someone not so dictatorial? 




   When Time Expires
by David Bourla (Bourla, director)
First release: 10 May 1997

Discredited interplanetary time traveler Travis Beck has been relegated to a routine calibration task in a sleepy desert town (where it rains a lot). But excitement arises in the form of a pretty local waitress, Travis’s ex-partner Luke Skywalker, and a team of assassins who have Travis in their crosshairs.

 The Ministry says if I work as an investifator for a couple of years, keep a low profile, not get in any trouble, then theyll consider me for real work again. 




   “Palindromic”
by Peter Crowther
First publication: First Contact, Jul 1997

I wouldn’t have used the word palindromic to describe the happenings of this story: Aliens arrive in 1964, and their sense of time is backward from ours. It’s not palindromic because they experience the events in backward order: If I spell out the word time, they will hear e-m-i-t. It would be cool, however, to have a real palindromic story where some sequence of events in reverse is the same as that sequence experienced forward, like the expression emit time.

P.S. I just stumbled across another time travel story that is an actual palindrome! Click the
Related: link above!

 He seemed to be trying hard to find the right word. “Theyre palindromic.” 




   Contact
adapted by James V. Hart and Michael Goldberg (Robert Zemeckis, director)
First release: 11 Jul 1997

Jodie Foster creates a convincing Ellie in this big screen release of Sagan’s novel.

 You want to classify prime numbers now? 




   Redux Riding Hood
by Dan O’Shannon (Steve Moore, director)
First release: 5 Aug 1997

Five years after the fact, Wolf is still haunted by the debacle that followed after his slip of the tongue (“All the better to eat you with”) gave the game away to Red, even though his wife Doris begs him to forget about it and move on with his life.

 Its a time machine. Dont you see? Now I can go back and have another shot at Little Red Riding Hood. 




   Lurid Tales: The Castle Queen
by Randall Fontana (Ellen Cabot, director)
First release: 26 Aug 1997

Economics student Tom Dunsmore has no clue what he’ll write his paper on. One potential topic is the reign of Charles I, but the video arcade/house-of-ill-repute down the street beckons. Fortunately, the also has an advanced chair that takes him back to a 17th century England and a castle full of sex-starved sisters who would do anything—absolutely anything—to keep their land out of the hands of the the Stuart king himself.

 So its some sort of new V.R. rig, is that it? 




   Safety Not Guaranteed Classified Ad
by John Silveira
First publication: Backwoods Home Magazine, Sep/Oct 1997

 Wanted: Somebody to go back in time with me.                     This is not a joke.