The Big List of Time Travel Adventures

 1984 to 2015

Caballo de Troya Series
English title: The Trojan Horse Series (translated from spanish)
by Juan José Benítez
First book: 1984

L.S. Thomas kindly sent me a copy of her English translation of the first of nine books about time travelers who visit the life of Christ. Another translation was written by Margaret Sayers Peden.

 The computer display read 23 hours, 3 minutes and 22 seconds on Thursday March 30 of the year 30. We had “traveled back” a total of 17,019,289 hours. 

[Aug 2013]

Norby Books
by Janet and Isaac Asimov
First time travel: 1984

In the second book of this children’s series (Norby’s Other Secret, 1984), the precocious robot reveals his time-travel powers to his pal Jeff; their mishaps in time continue in at least three later books (Norby and the Queen’s Necklace, Norby Finds a Villian, and Norby and Yobo’s Great Adventure).
[Jul 1985]

“The Toynbee Convector”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: Playboy, Jan 1984

You’ll enjoy this story (which was also an episode of Ray Bradbury Theater), but I’ll give away no more beyond the quote below. By the way, if you get the original publication, you’ll also acquire the last nude photo of Marilyn Monroe, although (to my knowledge) she never traveled through time.

 What can I do to save us from ourselves? How to save my friends, my city, my state, my country, the entire world from this obsession with doom? Well, it was in my library late one night that my hand, searching along shelves, touched at last on an old and beloved book by H.G. Wells. His time device called, ghostlike, down the years. I heard! I understood. I truly listened. Then I blueprinted. I built. I traveled . . . 

[Mar 2012]

The Bunjee Venture
aka The Amazing Bunjee Venture
adapted by Malcolm Marmorstein
First aired: 24 Mar 1984

Karen and Andy’s dad builds a time machine (the last crucial part being their mom’s hair dryer), and the kids travel back to the prehistoric past to find new parents for orphaned Bunjee critter babies.

I like the ABC Weekend and Afternoon Specials. This is the second one that I saw with time travel. It’s based on a book by Stan McMurtry that I haven't yet seen, and there was a follow-on episode, “The Return of the Bunjee” in 1985.

 Ive created the ultimate scientific masterpiece. Ive done the impossible. Ive invented a time machine! 

[Aug 2013]

“Twilight Time”
by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1984

Travis goes back to 1961 and the dance where he met his now-departed sweetheart, but he also has memories of aliens who quietly took over the world.

 A decade of peace and quiet and short hair was winding down; a time when people knew their place and stayed in it. For ten years nobody had wanted anything but a new car and a bigger TV set. Now all that was about to change. In a little over a year the Cuban missile crisis would send thousands of people into their back yards to dig bomb shelters, and “advisors” would start pouring into Southeast Asia. In another year the president would be dead. 

[Jun 1984]

The Philadelphia Experiment
adapted by Michael Janover, William Gray, et. al. (Stewart Rafill, director)
First release: 3 Aug 1984

Seaman David Herdeg and his pal are thrown from 1943 to 1984 during a naval experiment gone awry, and in that future, David is the only one who can save a missing town (provided he can dodge enough bullets and perhaps win the heart of the lovely Allison Hayes).

 Navy owes me 40 years back pay. 

[Jan 2011]

The Mackenzie Stories
by John Gribbin
First story: Analog, Sep 1984
Mackenzie, a researcher and problem solver who must continually justify his existence to his benefactor, is puzzled about why the things he sends back in time never reappear, but then in the first story (“Perpendicular Worlds,” Sep 1984 Analog) he starts thinking about Hawking black holes and Everett parallel worlds, and his work continues in a second story (“Random Variable,” Feb 1986 Analog) (although I prefer Gribbon’s science books).

 There must be as many different ways in which the world could have got into the state it is now as there are different ways in which it can develop into the future. 

[Jun 2013]

The Terminator
by James Cameron and William Wisher, Jr. (Cameron, director)
First release: 26 Oct 1984

Artificially intelligent machines from 2029 send a killer cyborg back to 1984 to kill the mother of John Connor because, in 2029, John will lead the resistance against the machines’ rule.

 Come with me if you want to live. 
—Kyle to Sarah at the Tech-Noir Club

[Oct 1984]

“Slan Libh”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Nov 1984
When Kevin O Malley’s home-built time machine becomes operable, he uses it to research his Irish ancestors during the potato blight of 1845.

 The past is changeable but self-correcting. Easy to change small things; harder to change big ones. 

[Jun 2013]

“The Life of Boswell”
by Jerry Oltion
First publication: Analog, Dec 1984
Michael Wagoner doesn't really want to be an English major and write poetry for the rest of his life, but what choice does he have—until the first day of his final semester when he meets a centerfold.

 All innocence, she turned to the middle, opened the gatefold, held it out sideways, then vertically. I dropped the beer when she shouted, “Grandma!” 

[Jun 2013]

by Harry Turtledove (as by Eric G. Iverson)
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1984
When 1950’s science fiction writer Mark Gordian has a flurry of great stories (“Watergate,” “Houston, We've Got a Problem,” “Neutron Star,” and the ultimate time-travel yarn, “All You Zombies”), Pete Lundquist has nothing but admiration, until Gordian comes out with a story that Pete himself has been outlining.

 “Oh, my God! Tet Offensive!” McGregor stared from one of them to the other. “Youre not telling me that ones based on fact?” 

[Jun 2013]

“Through Road No Wither”
by Greg Bear
First publication: Far Frontirs, Jan 1985
At a writers’ conference in Manhattan, KS, I was fortunate enough to sit beside the very kind and knowledgeable Greg Bear at the conference dinner, and I’ve enjoyed every piece of his fiction that I’ve read—but I simply didn’t understand this story any better than I understood its title. The story is set in an alternate version of 1984 where Hitler was victorious, and two lost SS officers come across a hag who (I think) sends them back in time.

 Your cities in flame, your women and children shriveling to black dolls in the heat of their burning homes. The death camps found and you stand accused of hideous crimes. 

[Dec 2013]

“Sailing to Byzantium”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Feb 1985

Charles Phillips is a 20th-century New Yorker in a 50th-century world of immortal leisurites who recreate cities from the past. The one item that you should find out for yourself, I’ll put into a cypher: rgwew ua bi runw relcwk~

 He knew very little about himself, but he knew that he was not one of them. That he knew. He knew that his name was Charles Phillips and that before he had come to live among these people he had lived in the year 1984, when there had been such things as computers and television sets and baseball and jet planes, and the world was full of cities, not merely five but thousands of them, New York and London and Johannesburg and Parks and Liverpool and Bangkok and San Franciscoand Buenos Ares and a multitude of others, all at the same time. 

[Mar 1985]

Trancers Movies
first movie by Danny Bilson and Paul DeMeo (Charles Band, director)
First movie: 22 May 1985

In the first of the six (really!) Trancer movies (plus a “lost” short), heroic trancer-hunter Jack Deth follows evil trancer-maker Martin Whistler from 2247 to 1985 via a drug-induced time-travel that can take you back to the body of an ancestor. What I don’t fully understand is how they blackmailed Helen Hunt to appear in the first three as Deth’s 1985 love interest.

 Trancers (22 May 1985)Jack v. Whistler
Trancers II (22 Aug 1991)Jack v. Whistler’s brother
Trancers III (14 Oct 1992)Jack back to the future
Trancers 4: Jack of Swords (2 Feb 1994)Jack v. Calaban
Trancers 5: Sudden Deth (9 Nov 1994)Jack v. Calaban (II)
Trancers 6 (23 Jul 2002)Jack (using stock footage) & Jo

 Greetings to the council. As you may have gathered, I have survived the pathetic trap set by Trooper Deth on Mecon 7. For twelve long years, you have hunted my disciples like dogs. Now, my day of vengence is at hand. Iv synthesized a time drug, and in a moment shall retreat down the dark corridors of history. Know that it is I who is solely responsible for your demise. One by one, your ancestors shall be murdered, and you, their progeny, shall cease to exist. Then shall I return, join my legion, and claim the seat of power for my own. Adieu . . . adieu . . . 

[Apr 2013]

Back to the Future
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 3 Jul 1985

Typical teenager Marty McFly meets Doc Brown for the first test of his DeLorean time machine, but when Libyan terrorists strike, things go awry, Marty and the DeLorean end up in 1955 where his parents are teens, and Doc must now send Marty back to the future.

 Next Saturday night, we’re sending you . . . back to the future! 

[May 1985]

1985 Pepsi Commercial
First aired: Summer 1985

 Relax, Smith. What could 12 oz. of Pepsi possibly change? 

My Science Project
by Jonathan R. Betuel (Betuel, director)
First release: 9 Aug 1985

Not even the support of a young Fisher Stevens (Gary’s friend Chuck from Early Edition) could rescue this story of a high school motorhead who steals a power-sucking, space-time transforming orb from a miltary base for his science project.

 Now that sounds like were dealing with a time-space warp. 

[Mar 2013]

by Carl Sagan
First publication: Sep 1985

Sagan’s philosophical opus centers around Dr. Ellie Arrowway, the discovery of a radio message from Vega, and the subsequent building of a machine in accordance with directions in the message. A key twist in the plot requires Ellie to briefly posit time travel as the only explanation that fits her scientific viewpoint.

 You know, its not called a space-time continuum for nothing. If they can make tunnels through space, I suppose they can make some kind of tunnels through time. 

[Jul 2012]

“Mozart in Mirrorshades”
by Bruce Sterling and Lewis Shiner
First publication: Omni, Sep 1985
Time travelers are pilfering 18th century resources and generally polute their century with pieces of modern culture.

And a little bone to pick, not with this story, but with Harry Turtledove, editor of The Best Alternate History Stories of the 20th Century, which includes this story. I suppose he’s just marketing the book with a title that he supposes will sell, but I would like a clear distinction drawn between alternate history (What if the South won the war?), time travel (such as this story), and true history (such as the true story of how Asimov met Campbell).

 At first Sutherland hadnt wanted Rice at the meeting with Jefferson. But Rice knew a little temporal physcis, and Jefferson had been pestering the American personnel with questions about time holes and parallel worlds. 

[Dec 2013]

Transformers Cartoons
created by Takara Tomy
First time travel: 24 Oct 1985

Two groups of robots who crashed to Earth in the distant past have returned to life and are making Earth—past and present— their battleground. These are the time-travel cartoon episodes that I spotted in the four original seasons (1984-1987) and in the Beast Wars episodes (1996-1999) in which time travel was commonplace. I haven’t seen the later series [Robots in Disguise (2000-2002), the Unicron Trilogy (2001-2006), the more recent animated series (2007-2010), and the webisodes (2010)].

 Dinobot Island, Part 2 (26 Sep 1985)
A Decepticon . . . King Arthur’s Court (24 Oct 1985)}
Forever Is a Long Time Coming (8 Oct 1986)
Beast Wars, Part 1 (16 Sep 1996)
Code of Hero (9 Mar 1998)
The Agenda, Part 3 (13 Mar 1998)
Optimal Situation (25 Oct 1998)
Cutting Edge (15 Nov 1998)
Other Victories (5 Mar 1999)
Nemesis, Part 2 (7 Mar 1999)

 They were called Autobots and Decepticons. But the brutal Decepticons were driven by a single goal: total domination. They set out to destroy the peace-loving Autobots, and a war between the forces of good and evil raged across Cybertron. 

[Mar 2014]

“Under Siege”
by George R.R. Martin
First publication: Omni, Oct 1985

After a nuclear war, Americans attempt to prevent the rise of Russia at the outset of the 19th century by traveling back to that time and inhabiting the bodies of key Finnish and Swedish military men during the siege of Sveaborg.

 He began to babble about Sveaborg, about the importance of what we are doing here, about the urgent need to change something, somehow, to prevent the Soviet Union from ever coming into existence, and thus forestall the war that has laid the world to waste. 

[Apr 2014]

The Cat Who Walks Through Walls
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Nov 1985

Richard Ames doesn’t like the fact that a new acquaintance was killed while dining at his table. Killed, why? and by whom? and why won’t that cat stay put? The eventual answers could lead Richard to Lazarus Long, the Time Corps, and more multiperson pantheistic solipsism.

 My darling had planned a pianissimo approach: Live for a time on Tertius (a heavenly place), get me hooked on multiverse history and time travel theory, et cetera. Not crowd me about signing up, but depend on the fact that she and Gretchen and Ezra and others (Uncle Jock, e.g.) were in the Corps . . . until I asked to be allowed to be sworn in. 

[Dec 1985]

The Twilight Zone (2nd Series)
created by Rod Serling
First time travel: 6 Jan 1985

Three seasons with 7 time-travel episodes. Harlan Ellison was a consultant on the series that included an adaptation of his “One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty.” The series also adapted Sturgeon’s “Yesterday Was Monday’, altering the plot and renaming it to “A Matter of Minutes,” and George R.R. Martin did the script for the time-travel episode “The Once and Future King” based on an idea submitted by Bryce Maritano.

 One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty (6 Dec 1985)   Hero to his childhood
A Matter of Minutes (24 Jan 1986)From 9:33 AM to 11:37 AM
Profile in Silver (7 Mar 1986)Kennedy in 1963
The Once and Future King (27 Sep 1986)Elvis in 1954
The Junction (21 Feb 1987)To 1912
Time and Teresa Golowitz (10 Jul 1987)Hero to his youth
Extra Innings (1 Oct 1988)Baseball in 1910

 Let the record show that in any age—good or bad—there are men of high ideals: men of courage, men who do more than that for which they are called upon. You will not always know their names. But let their deeds stand as monuments, so that when the human race is called to judgment, we may say, ‘This too was humanity!’ 
—JFK in “Profile in Silver”

[Sep 1985]

Conrad Stargard’s Adventures
by Leo Frankowski
First book: Feb 1986

Conrad Stargard, 20th century Polish engineer, stumbles through a time portal that was accidentally left open by those meddlers in the Historical Corps, and finds himself in 13th century Poland, whereupon he does any Connecticut Yankee proud.

One night when we were playing duplicate bridge, Bryan Campbell told me that this was the favorite time-travel series of a friend of his, which goes to show that just because my rating of a story is low, doesn’t mean that you (or Bryan’s friend) won’t enjoy it.

 The Cross-Time Engineer (Feb 1986)
The High-Tech Knight (Mar 1989)
The Radiant Warrior (Jul 1989)
The Flying Warlord (Oct 1989)
Lord Conrad’s Lady (Sep 1990)
Conrad’s Quest for Rubber (Dec 1998)
Conrad’s Time Machine (Sep 2002)
Lord Conrad’s Crusade (Aug 2005)

 “This country and this century are in horrible shape because of the lack of socialism!”
   “You are absolutely right, Sir Conrad! What is socialism?”

[Jun 2012]

“The Pure Product”
by John Kessel
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Mar 1986

A cynical psychopath from the future takes a road trip (sometimes with random blood, sometimes with trite tripping) across 20th-century North America.

 “I said, have you got something going,” she repeated, still with the accent—the accent of my own time. 

[Jul 2011]

Highway of Eternity
by Clifford D. Simak
First publication: June 1986

Jay Corcoran and Tom Boone are trying to track down a missing client when the building they are in is demolished and the two of them jump into a time machine that takes them to one of the pockets of rebels from the far future who are resisting the decorporealization of man.

 Horace, the hardheaded, practical lout, the organizer, the schemer. Emma, the moaner, the keeper of our consciences. Timothy, the student. Enid, the thinker. And I, the loafer, the bad example, the one who makes the others feel virtuous. 

[Jun 2012]

Flight of the Navigator
by Mark H. Baker, Michael Burton and Matt MacManus (Randal Kleiser, director)
First release: 30 Jul 1986

Twelve-year-old David Freeman stumbles down a ravine and wakes up eight years later without having aged, but that’s not the time travelin’ in this movie, which occurs only after he becomes the pilot of a small space ship that’s been collecting specimens from around the galaxy.

Janet said that I had to mention I fell asleep during this one.

 This is totally rad. Youre like my big little brother. 

[Jun 2012]

Lazer Tag Academy
produced by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears
First episode: 13 Sep 1986

Young Jamie Jaren, the Lazer Tag champion of 3010, travels back to 1980 to protect her distant teenaged ancestors from the evil Draxon Drear who was unwittingly released into that earlier era.

 As Drear races through time in his quest to conquer the future, he is pursued by Jamie Jaren. Jamie must team with her ancestors Tom, Beth and Nicky Jaren. Join us now in their adventure through time to preserve the past, save the future, and keep the peace established by . . . the Lazer Tag Academy! 

[Aug 2013]

Peggy Sue Got Married
by Jerry Leichtling and Arlene Sarner (Francis Coppola, director)
First release: 10 Oct 1986

Middle-aged Peggy Sue has two grown children and an adulterous husband whom she married at 18, so will she do things the same when she finds herself back in 1960 in her senior year of high school?

 Well, Mr Snelgrove, I happen to know that in the future I will not have the slightest use for algebra, and I speak from experience. 

[Oct 2010]

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
by Gene Roddenberry, Leonard Nimoy, Have Bennett, et. al. (Nimoy, director)
First release: 26 Nov 1986

As the brave crew of the Enterprise are returning to Earth to stand trial for the events of the previous movie, Spock determines that Earth’s demise is imminent unless they can return to 1986 and retrieve a humpback whale (which they then proceed to do).

I saw this in the theater with Deb Baker and Jon Shultis during a winter trip to Pittsburgh for a small computer science education conference.

 McCoy: You realize that by giving him the formula you’re alterning the future.
Scotty: Why? How do we know he didnt invent the thing? 

[Dec 1986]

Muppet Babies
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 27 Dec 1986

As babies, all the muppets are occasionally looked after by Nannie. They first time traveled by taking Gonzo’s supersonic snowmobile trike back to rescue Nanny’s ruined yearbook in “Back to the Nursery.”

 Back to the Nursery (27 Dec 1986)trike to the past
Romancing the Weirdo (11 Nov 1989)a time machine in Gonzo’s novel
The Next Generation (15 Sep 1990)Rowlf visits his future grandson

 But how can we replace a picture taken a zillion years ago? 
—“Back to the Nursery”

[Dec 1986]

“Le gouffre des années”
English title: “The Gulf of the Years” (translated from French)
by Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud
First publication: Le héroes blessé au bras, 1987
I read the English translation from Châteaureynaud’s collection, A Life on Paper (2010). The story tells of a man who returns to occupied France during World War II on the morning that his mother was killed by an errant bomb. I enjoyed the writing, but was unsatisfied with the ending.

 Youre Jean-Jacques Manoir, arent you? Right? You dont know me, but I know all about you. 

[Apr 2014]

Project Pendulum
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: 1987

Ricky and Sean Gabrielson, 23-year-old identical twins, are the first men to travel through time, taking ever larger swings that send one backward and one forward.

This was the first book that I read in the rare books room of the University of Colorado library from the Brian E. Lebowitz Collection of 20th Century Jewish American Literature.

 Hi there. Youre not going to believe this, but Im you of the year 2016, taking part in the first time-travel experiment ever. 

[Apr 2012]

Fraggle Rock
created by Jim Henson
First time travel: 23 Feb 1987

The symbolic and colorful world of Jim Henson’s fraggle muppets included at least one moment of time travel when Mokey, Boober and Wembly are mysteriously transported back to a time of fraggles who cannot laugh.

 Wouldnt it be fun to travel in time? O’ course, you wouldnt really go anywhere. No, Sprocket, because the past and the future are happening now, here in the present. Its all a question of perception. I thought dogs knew things like that. 

[Jan 2014]

The story also appeared in this 1990 collection.
“The Silver Box”
by Louise Lawrence
First publication: A Quiver of Ghosts, Mar 1987
While searching for a ghost in the past, Mark and Zak stumble upon young Carole, shut up in her bedroom with glandular fever in 1987.

 What else do we live for but the little mundane things of life? If we sit around waiting for the few, rare wonderful moments that make it all worthwhile we may as well not live at all. 

[Jan 2014]

adapted by Brian Clemens (Schultz, director)
First aired: 10 Mar 1987 (made-for-tv)

After the death of his wife and child, Dr. Scott McKenzie stumbles upon a tintype photograph from the old west with three corpses, a shooter and a modern Magnum 357, leading him to develop a theory of time travel that is soon confirmed when a beautiful woman of the future appears to take him back to the old west in order to chase the shooter, save President Cleveland, and pursue other obvious plot developments.

 Georgia: Very impressive, professor. Its a small wonder you were considered one of the worlds foremost authorities.
The Professor: [incredulously] Were? 

[Dec 2012]

Amazing Stories
created by Steven Spielberg
First time travel: 20 Mar 1987

Steven Spielberg brought Amazing Stories to tv in two seasons of an anthology format. At least one time-travel story—Jack Finney’s venerable “Such Interesting Neighbors”—appeared in the second season (20 Mar 1987).

Janet and I bought our first color tv for these episodes, a Sony of course.

 Oh, Randy, neighbors are always strange; those are the rules. 

[Mar 1987]

by Michael Crichton
First publication: 12 May 1999

Because he wrote a government report on how to handle alien contact, psychologist Norman Johnson is called to the scene when the Navy discovers a 300-year-old crashed space ship on the Pacific floor. But it turns out to be an American space ship, just not from today’s America.

 And yet now we have proof that time travel is possible—and that our own species will do it in the future! 

[Oct 2015]

To Sail Beyond the Sunset
by Robert A. Heinlein
First publication: Jul 1987

In the 19th century, Maureen Johnson grows up near Kansas City, eventually marrying and raising her own brood, including Lazarus Long (the original) and Lazarus Long (from the future).

 I found myself offering my hand and greeting a young man who matched in every way (even to his body odor, which I caught quite clearly—clean male, in fresh rut)—a man who was my father as my earliest memory recalled him. 

[Dec 1987]

Masters of the Universe
by David Odell (Gary Goddard, director)
First release: 7 Aug 1987

With the help of ominous John-Williams-soundalike music and a Cosmic Key that opens portals to other places, the evil Skeletor has finally conquered Castle Greyskull, giving him the power needed to become the Master of the Universe himself. Fortunately, He-Man and his warriors have a copy of the key and can save the universe! Unless they misplace it and two current-day Earth teens stumble upon it.

I watched the movie through to the end(!), but spotted only one explicit small item to indicate that the key might transport through time as well as space: When Skeletor’s minionette locates the copy of the key, she says that they can find it within a “parsec-eon,” which kind of sounds like a space-time measurement. In addition, those who know the He-Man franchise tell me that he is a far-future descendant of Earth humans on the planet of Eternia, which means that the trip back to current-day Earth was through time. So it is a time-travel movie(!) but that fact has no bearing on the movie’s plot.

 I call it . . . The Cosmic Key! It is the most unique key in the universe. The tones it generates can open a doorway to anywhere. 

[Oct 2015]

Calvin and Hobbes
by Bill Watterson
First time travel: 31 Aug 1987

 Relax! We’ll be back as soon as we go.          

““Lui-même en Anachron””
by Cordwainer Smith
First publication: Les puissances de’espace, Sep 1987
Tasco Magnon, time traveler, decides to take his new bride on his next trip through time—a quest to find the mythical Knot in Time, where the two of them get trapped and only one can return.

After Smith’s death in 1966, the story was completed by his wife and sold to Harlan Ellison’s anthology The Last Dangerous Vision. In 1987, a translated version of the story was published in a French collection of Smith’s stories, so that the first published version was in French (although I have listed the English title above, since that’s how it was written). The English version was finally publisheded in Smith’s 1993 complete short science fiction collection by NESFA. By then, Ellison’s rights to the story had expired, although that didn’t stop him from suing NESFA.

 ‘Honeymoon in time,’ indeed. Why? Is it that your woman is jealous of your time trips? 

[Apr 2014]

by Ken Grimwood
First publication: Sep 1987
After 43-year-old radio newsman Jeff Winston dies, he finds himself back in his 18-year-old body in 1963—an occurrence that keeps happening each time he dies again in 1988; eventually, in one of his lives, he finds Pamela, another replayer, and they work at figuring out the meaning of it all (without success).

 So he hadnt died. Somehow, the realization didnt thrill him, just as his earlier assumption of death had failed to strike him with dread. 

[Jun 2011]

The Jukebox Stories
by Dean Wesley Smith
First story: Night Cry, Fall 1987

A jukebox in the Garden Lounge does more than make you remember the time of the song. It actually takes you to that time.

I’ve yet to find a good guide to these stories and where they can be obtained. The first story, “The Jukebox Man’ appeared in 1987 in a sister magazine to The Twilight Zone Magazine. Here’s a list of the other stories that I know of, although the only one I’ve read so far is “Jukebox Gifts’:

 The Jukebox Man (Fall 1987)Night Cry
A Bubble for a Minute (Jan 1994)By Any Other Fame
Jukebox Gifts (Jan 1994)F&SF
Black Betsy (Oct 1994)Alternate Outlaws
The Ghost of the Garden Lounge (Nov 2005)Time After Time
He Could Have Coped with Dragons (Nov 2009)chapbook
A Golden Dream (Jul 2010)chapbook
The Songs of Memory (Jul 2012)chapbook
Our Slaying Song Tonight (Oct 2012)chapbook
The Wages of the Moment (Jan 2013)chapbook
She Arrived without a Song (May 2013)chapbook

 I had carefully typed onto labels the names of over sixty Christmas songs, then taped them next to the red buttons. Somewhere in this jukebox, I hoped there would be a special song for each man. A song that would trigger a memory and a ride into the past. My Christmas present to each of them. 
—“Jukebox Gifts”

[Jun 2015]

The Time Guardian
by John Baxter and Brian Hannant (Hannant, director)
First release: 3 Dec 1987

When terminatoresque cyborgs attack a future Australian city (headed by Quantum Leap’s favorite scoundrel, Dean Stockwell, and defended by everyone’s favorite princess, Carrie Fisher), the scientists taken them all back in time—a fine plan until the evil cyborgs follow.

 One city attempted to escape their onslaught by unraveling the secrets of time and travelling back in a desperate search for a safer age . . . they succeeded and time was their friend until the arrival yet again of their relentless enemy. 

[Apr 2013]

The Devil’s Arithmetic
by Jane Yolen
First publication: 1988

In fifth grade, Hannah read this intense novel of a young modern Jewish girl thrown back to the concentration camps of World War II Germany.

 Hannah was stunned. It was as if shed suddenly been transported to a movie set. 

[May 1989]

One Life to Live
created by Agnes Nixon
First time travel: 1988

In a 1988 plot line (“Buchanan City”), Clint ends up back in 1888 where he falls in love and is betrothed to Viki’s look-alike ancestor Ginny!

Apart from Dark Shadows (which, as we all know, was more than a soap opera), this is the first time travel that I’ve spotted in a soap.

 Ginny: I was staring up at the night sky trying to find that extra planet that you claimed was there when I was giving the children their astronomy lesson today.
Clint: Why cant you just take my word for it?
Ginny: Because brilliant scientists have studied the heavens and deduced that there are only a certain number of planets in our solar system—eight, just eight. And then you come along and throw the whole system out of question! 

[Jun 2015]

by Dean Koontz
First publication: 1988

Right from her birth, Laura Shane has had a quick wit, a fateful loss of those close to her, and a time-traveling guardian angel who is himself chased by his evil compatriots.

 One of the things he had learned from the experiments in the institute was that reshaping fate was not always easy. Destiny struggled to reassert the pattern that was meant to be. Perhaps being molested and psychologically destroyed was such an immutable part of Lauras fate that Stefan could not prevent it from happening sooner or later. 

[Aug 2012]

“The Turning Point”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The Drabble Project, 1 Apr 1988

In exactly 100 words, Madison goes back in time to meet himself at the turning point of his young life.

Thanks to Marc Richardson for sending this one to me.

 He was a clerk. 

[Mar 2012]

“Fire, Fire”
by Allison Prince
First publication: A Haunting Refrain, May 1988
When young Emma falls behind her parents on a country outing, she finds herself at a Neolithic funeral pyre.

 Emma, we cant keep waiting for you all the time. We"re nearly at the top—see you up there, all right? Its not far. 

[Jan 2014]

Star Trek: The Next Generation
created by Gene Roddenberry
First time travel: 2 May 1988

I watched the premier with Harry and Cathy just four weeks before Hannah was born. In the seven seasons, there were 12 time-travel episodes.

 We’ll Always Have Paris (2 May 1988)repeated seconds
Time Squared (3 Apr 1989)back six hours
Yesterday’s Enterprise (19 Feb 1990)Enterprise C from 2344 to 2366
Captain’s Holiday (2 Apr 1990)Vorgans from 27th century
A Matter of Time (18 Nov 1991)historian from 26th century
Cause and Effect (23 Mar 1992)time loop
Time’s Arrow I/II (15 Jun / 21 Sep 1992)   to 1890s San Francisco
Tapestry (15 Feb 1993)Picard’s earlier life
Firstborn (25 Apr 1994)Worf’s son from 40 years ahead
All Good Things I/II (23 May 1994)jumping between three times

 Make it so. 

[Sep 1987]

“Ripples in the Dirac Sea”
by Geoffrey A. Landis
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1988

A physics guy invents a time machine that can go only backward and must always return the traveler to the exact same present from which he left.


  1. Travel is possible only into the past.
  2. The object transported will return to exactly the time and place of departure.
  3. It is not possible to bring objects from the past to the present.
  4. Actions in the past cannot change the present.
[Nov 1988]

“On the Watchtower at Plataea”
by Garry Kilworth
First publication: Other Edens II, Nov 1988
Miriam and her fellow time travelers, John and Stan, set up camp in an abandoned watchtower to observe and record the siege of the walled city-state Plataea in the Peloponnesian War.

 It was a shock to find that the expedition could go no further back than 429 BC; though for some of us, it was not an unwelcome one. Miriam was perhaps the only one amongst us who was annoyed that we couldn't get to Pericles. He had died earlier, in the part of the year we couldnt reach. So near—but we had hit a barrier, as solid as a rockface on the path of linear time, in the year that the Peloponnesian War was gaining momentum. 

[Apr 2014]

The Navigator: A Medieval Odyssey
by Geoff Chapple, Kely Lyons and Vincent Ward (Ward, director)
First release: 15 Dec 1988

To ward off the Black Death, young Griffin, local hero Connor, and others from their village plan to dig a whole through the Earth where they'll give an offering to the powers that be, but instead, they end up digging a tunnel to a marvelous twentieth-century city.

 Think how much power youd need for all that! 

[Oct 2015]

“The Instability”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: The London Observer, 1 Jan 1989

Professor Firebrenner explains to Atkins how they can go forward in time to study a red dwarf and then return back to Earth.

 Of course, but how far can the Sun and Earth move in the few hours it will take us to observe the star? 

[Dec 1999]

“Real Time”
by Lawrence Watt-Evans
First publication: Asimovs’s Science Fiction, Jan 1989
An unnamed time-travel guard is trapped in the 20th century and must keep ever vigilant against those who might tamper with the time line because you never know whether the time guard will be able to handle it all.

 They might send someone else, but they might not. The tampering might have already changed things too much. 

[Nov 2015]

Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure
by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon (Stephen Herek, director)
First release: 17 Feb 1989

The Two Great Ones, Bill S. Preston, Esq., and Ted “Theodore” Logan, are the subjects of time-traveler Rufus’s mission, but instead they end up using his machine to write a history report to save their band Wyld Stallyns.

 Most excellent! 

[Jul 2010]

Quantum Leap
created by Donald Bellisario
First episode: 26 Mar 1989

Physicist and all-around good guy Sam Beckett rushes his time machine into production—funding is about to be cut!—and as a consequence, he shifts from one life to another, always with a moral mission and his holographic cohort Al.

 Oh boy! 

[Mar 1989]

“The Price of Oranges”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1989

Harry’s closet takes him back to 1937 where his social security income buys cheaper oranges, treats for his friend Manny, and possibly a companionable man for his jaded granddaughter Jackie.

 Harry bought a pair of socks, thick gray wool, for 89 cents. When the man took his dollar, Harry held his breath: each first time made a little pip in his stomach. But on one ever looked at the dates of old bills. He bought two oranges for five cents each, and then, thinking of Manny, bought a third. At a candystore he bought G-8 and His Battle Aces for fifteen cents. At The Collectors Cozy in the other time they would gladly give him thirty dollars for it. Finally, he bought a cherry Coke for a nickel and headed towards the park. 

[May 1989]

“Great Work of Time”
by John Crowley
First publication: Novelty: Four Stories, May 1989

When a secret society called the Otherhood acquires Caspar Last’s time machine in 1983, they set out to change history so that the British Empire never declines (although it may be infused with various Lovecraftian species such as the Draconics), an endeavor for which in 1956 they recruit Denys Winterset, one of the Colonial Service’s many assistant district commissioners of police.

 Of course the possible worlds we make dont compare to the real one we inhabit—not nearly so well furnished, or tricked out with details. And yet still somehow better. More satisfying. Perhaps the novelist is only a special case of a universal desire to reshape, to ‘take this sorry scheme of things entire,’ smash it into bits, and ‘remold it nearer to the hearts desire’—as old Kyayyám says. The egoist is continually doing it with his own life. To dream of doing it with history is no more useful a game, I suppose, but as a game, it shows more sport. 

[Feb 2015]

Field of Dreams
by Phil Aldin Robinson
First release: 5 May 1989

Corn farmer Ray Kinsella is called to build a ballpark in his cornfield (with part of his calling resulting from a trip to 1972); once the field is built, various ballplayers from the past come.

 If you build it, they will come. 

[Dec 1992]

“A Sleep and a Forgetting”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: Playboy, Jul 1989

Mike is pulled out of his quiet tenured life as a professor in the Department of Sinological Studies at the University of Washington because his lifelong friend Joe Hedley seems to be receiving transmissions in Mongolian. When Mike arrives, he not only understands the transmission, but can talk back as well.

Time travel and alternate histories often overlap, usually when some incident of time travel to the past creates the alternate timeline. This story is an intriguing alternative where a supposedly alternate past history is discovered through the two-way transmission through time, but the origin of the alternate timeline remains a mystery.

 Weirder and weirder, I thought. A Christian Mongol? Living in Byzantium? Talking to me on the space telephone out of the twelfth century? 

[Jul 2015]

Mixed Doubles
by Daniel da Cruz
First publication: Aug 1989
Justin Pope, a music major (like Paul Eisebrey!), stumbles upon a time machine that he uses to kidnap Franz Schubert from his deathbed; Pope cures Franz and uses him as a source of compositions to create a magnificent career of his own (with the help of Angelica), until Franz turns the tables (with the help of Philipa).

Paul Eisenbrey introduced me to this author in college, but I found Mixed Doubles on my own some years later.

 From time to time double checking with the manual, he began to punch in the commands that, he had calculated from ceaseless experimentation, would project him three thousand years into the past, plus of minus fifteen years. It was a vast improvement on his first efforts, which had been accurate only to within two centuries. The reentry program was more precise by orders of magnitude: it would bring him back to the moment of departure, plus zero to seventeen hours. 

[May 1990]

Ray Bradbury Theater
created by Ray Bradbury
First time travel: 11 Aug 1989

Ray Bradbury Theater ran for two seasons on HBO starting 21 May 1985. It then shifted to the USA Network for four seasons which had three time-travel adaptations.

 A Sound of Thunder (11 Aug 1989)dinosaur hunt
Touch of Petulance (12 Oct 1990)newspaper from the future
The Toynbee Convector (26 Oct 1990)   100 years into the future

 Dinosaurs large and small fill my junkyard workroom.
This one given to me by a friend 30 years ago. These given as toys to my daughters, and when they didnt play with them I simply took them back. So with dinosaurs coming into my life, I often wondered what would happen if I could go back into theirs. Dinosaurs, time machines, put them together and you have a
tale one billion years old.
—Bradbury’s introduction to “A Sound of Thunder”

[Mar 2012]

by John Varley (Michael Anderson, director)
First release: 25 Aug 1989

Cheryl Ladd plays Louise Baltimore opposite Kris Kristopherson’s Bill Smith.

 For one thing, paradoxes can occur. Say you build a time machine, go backwards in time and murder your father when he was ten years old. That means you were never born. And if you were never born, how did you build the time machine? Paradox! It's the possibility of wiping out your own existence that makes most people rule out time-travel. Still, why not? If you were careful, you could do it. 

[Aug 2011]

The Smurfs
created by Peyo (aka Pierre Culliford)
First time travel: 9 Sep 1989

While trying to return a dinosaur to its proper time at the start of Season 9, a time whirlwind whips the annoying little mushroom blueters into time—a condition that’s carried on through the rest of the season.

 Well, Papa Smurf, there is one way to get this critter back home, but its awfully dangerous. 

[Jul 2013]

Ring Raiders
by Phil Harnage
First episode: 16 Sep 1989

Matchbox produced and aired five cartoon episodes in 1989 to promote their Ring Raider line of toys including the time-traveling planes of the evil Skull Squadron and the right-stuff Ring Raider pilots.

 Lieutenant, Ive got three strange bogeys about a mile north-northwest. Theyre like nothing Ive ever seen before. They dont even have props. 

[Aug 2013]

Back to the Future II
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 22 Nov 1989

Doc Brown takes Marty and Jennifer from 1985 to 2015 to save their children from a bad fate, but the consequences pile up when Biff also gets in on the time-travel action.

 The time-traveling is just too dangerous. Better that I devote myself to study the other great mystery of the universe—women! 

[Jul 1989]

Time Barbarians
by Joseph John Barmettler (Barmetler, director)
First release: 1990

In an ancient world of swords, sorcery, loin cloths, and jeweled bikinis, an evil thief kills King Deran’s queen before escaping to modern-day Los Angeles. Since the thief also took a magic amulet with him, a loinclothless wizardess sends Deran after him to retrieve the amulet and avenge the queen’s brutal death.

 The man you seek is in this world no longer. You must travel to another time to find him. 

[Sep 2015]

12:01 P.M.
by Richard Lupoff, Stephen Tolkin and Jonathan Heap (Heap, director)
First release: 1990 (27 minute short film)

Kurtwood Smith brings Myron Castleman’s 59 minutes to life.

 You see, it’s like . . . it’s like we’re stuck. You know, like a . . . like a needle on a scratched record. It all starts at 12:01, and everything goes along fine until one o’clock and then Bam! the whole world snaps back to 12:01 again. 

[Dec 2011]

Eternity Comics’ The Time Machine
adapted by Bill Spangler and John Ross
First publication: Apr 1990

This three-issue black-and-white adaptation has some creative twists such as when it occurs to the time traveller how to use the machine to destroy the Morlocks.

 I was elated! I gripped the starting lever with both hands and went off with a thud. 

[Jan 2012]

Back to the Future III
by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale (Zemeckis, director)
First release: 25 May 1990

Marty and 1955 Doc travel back to the old west where the older Doc is trapped along with various Biff ancestors and a possible love interest for Doc.

 It means your future hasn’t been written yet. No one’s has. Your future is whatever you make it. 

[May 1990]

Future Zone
aka Future Force 2
by David A. Prior (Prior, director)
First release: 18 Jul 1990

John Tucker—a future gunslinging cop in Mobile, AL, played by David Carradine—is visited by a thirty-year-old Billy who’s almost as quick on the draw as John. But—ah, Grasshopper—just where does the visitor’s prescient knowledge come from, and more to the point given the ending of the film: Who taught Billy to shoot?

 Tucker: Where’d you learn to shoot like that?
Billy: You might say I learned from the best.
Tucker: And who might that be?
Billy: You’d never believe me. 

[Oct 2015]

Alvin and the Chipmonks
by Dianne Dixon
First time travel: 8 Sep 1990

It was not until the final season of the Alvin revival (nearly two decades after creator Bagdasarian’s death) that Theodore, Simon and Alvin had a series of movie take-offs including Dianne Dixon’s episode, “Back to Our Future,” in which the quirky inventor Clyde Crashcup (filling in for Doc Brown) brings the 90s trio back to the 50s to stop the original trio from giving up their singing careers.

 Now remember boys, you must convince the old Alvin to stick with his musical career, so you can all be stars in the future! 

[Sep 2012]

Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure (Animated)
produced by David Kirschner, Paul Sabella, and Andy Heyward
First episode: 15 Sep 1990

 . . . featuring the most outstanding voices of the original Two Great Ones, but bogus plots and dialog.

 ♫ Whenever time stands still and trouble moves too fast, to save the future, we must learn about the past. ♫ 

[Jul 2010]

The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3
created by Reed Shelly and Bruce Shelly
First time travel: 29 Sep 1990

The animation and sound effects are a good reflection of the video game. In one episode (“Toddler Terrors of Time Travel”), the son of King Bowser invents a time machine to go back in time and stop Mario, Luigi and Toad from ever coming to their kingdom. The heroes stow away, and everyone ends up as toddlers in Brooklyn.

 Maybe we can go back and change history, King Dad. All we need is a little time travel. 

[Sep 2012]

The Spirit of '76
by Roman Coppola and Lucas Reiner (Reiner, director)
First release: 12 Oct 1990

In the year 2176, three time travelers aiming for 1776 end up in the time of David Cassidy and disco instead.

 Channel Six, our foremost epistomological anthrosociologist has redlined and outlined you for a mission back in time. 

[Nov 2014]

“The Time Traveler”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Nov 1990

The little demon Azazel (the hero of many an Asimov tale) sends a world-renowned writer travels back in time to see his first writing teacher at a 1934 school that is remarkably like Asimov’s own Boys High in Brooklyn.

 “Because,” and here he struck his chest a resounding thump, “the burning memories of youthful snubs and spurnings remain unavenged and, indeed, forever unavengable.” 

[Dec 1990]

Frankenstein Unbound
adapted by Roger Corman and F.X. Feeney (Corman, director)
First release: 2 Nov 1990

Joe Buchanan invents a weapon that was meant to be so terrible it would end war forever, but the weapon causes time rifts, one of which takes him (and his futuristic talking car, a.k.a. his electric carriage) back in time where he meets Dr. Frankenstein (a standoffish man, but willing to talk science), Frankenstein’s monster (who is fascinated with the talking car) and Mary Wollstonecraft (a budding author).

It did a reasonable job of bringing Brian Aldiss’s book’s premise to the screen, with a better pace than the book, but the short dream sequences were ineffective for me and Dr. Frankenstein is more of a clichéd villian than in the book.

 Zero pollution, maximum ozone shield: Something tells me were not in New Los Angeles any more. 

[Oct 2015]

“Ben Franklin’s Laser”
by Doug Beason
First publication: Analog, mid-Dec 1990
It appears that the sun will go nova in 75 hours, which leaves Grayson to go back in time to give a boost to science in Ben Franklin’s time.

 It sounded nice and simple: allow Ben Franklin to invent the laser and let the technology casade. Grow enough so that in five hundred years wed have something to get us out of this mess. 

[Aug 2012]

“3 RMS Good View”
by Karen Haber
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, mid-Dec 1990
When a lawyer from the future decides to rent an apartment in 1968 San Francisco, she must first sign your standard temporal noninterference contract—yeah, like that one ever holds up in court!

 Dont change the past or the past will change you. The time laws. You lawyers understand this kind of thing. You, and you alone, are responsible for any dislocation of past events, persons or things, et cetera et cetera. Read the small print and sign. 

[Dec 1990]

by David Twohy (Steve Miner, director)
First release: 11 Jan 1991

A captured warlock in 1691 Massachusetts is thrown forward 300 years to Los Angeles with warlock-hunter Giles Redferne in hot pursuit. Twentieth century chase ensues with pretty nurse Kassandra aiding the hunter.

 A grand grimore? Here? Now? 

[Jul 2015]

“The Romanian Question”
by Michael Moorcock
First publication: Back Brain Recluse 18, Spring 1991

Jerry appears to be a time traveler (or maybe God) involved with Hitler and the democratic movement in Romania, but really did’t get it. But the bicycle he rides as a time machine shares a description with the time machine in “Behold the Man.”

 The time machine was a sphere of milky fluid attached to the front lamp-holder of a Raleigh “Royal Albert” Police Bicycle of the old, sturdy type, before all the corruption had been made public. 

[Feb 2014]

aka “Cross Roads Blues”
by Paul McAuley
First publication: Interzone, Apr 1991

In an alternate 1960s America where the U.S. is isolationist and Adam Clayton Powell is president, Time traveler (or “Loop rider”) Ike Turner has a fascination with blues player Bobby Johnson, so he sticks around a bit longer than he should in 1937 to meet the musician. It shouldn’t be a big deal; after all, according to Einstein, not even the Loop riders can change the past.

 Anyway, he went away maybe a year, and I dont know if he went to the crossroads with ol Legba or not, but Son House told me when he came back he was carryin a gitar, and asked for a spot like old times. Well, Son was about ready to take a break, and told Bobby Johnson to go ahead and got himself outside before the boy began. But that time it was all changed. That time, he tol me, the music he heard Bobby Johnson make put the hair on his head to standin. 

[Apr 2014]

“Robot Visions”
by Isaac Asimov
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 1991

A team of Temporalists send robot RG-32 200 years into the future where it seems to almost all that mankind is doing better than expected on Earth and in space.

 RG-32 was a rather old-fashioned robot, eminently replaceable. He could observe and report, perhaps without quite the ingenuity and penetration of a human being—but well enough. He would be without fear, intent only on following orders, and he could be expected to tell the truth. 

[May 1991]

“The Gallery of His Dreams”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Axolotl Press, Jul 1991

Having spent his life and his fortune documenting the American Civil War, pioneering photographer Mathew Brady is repeatedly visited by a woman of the future who asks him to photograph the horrors of the wars she knows, starting with Hiroshima.

 Im sorry, maam,” Brady said. He didnt turn to see which portraits she had indicated. “I didnt mean to offend you. These portraits show what war really is, and I think its something we need to remember lest we try it again.” 

[Sep 2015]

T2: Judgement Day
by James Cameron and William Wisher, Jr. (Cameron, director)
First release: 1 Jul 1991

Once more, the machines from 2029 send back a killer cyborg, this time a T-1000 to kill John Connor himself in 1995, but Connor of the future counters by sending one of the original Model 101s to save himself.

 Come with me if you want to live. 
—The T-800 to Sarah at the Pescadero State Hospital

[Jul 1991]

Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey
by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon (Stephen Herek, director)
First release: 19 Jul 1991

Two Evil Robots come from the future to kill Bill and Ted and destroy their babes, and after that happens, the Two Great Ones begin a journey that starts with Death and ends with Two Little Ones.

 Look, after we get away from this guy, we use the booth. We time travel back to before the concert and set up the things we need to get him now. 

[Jul 2010]

Quantum Leap Comic Books
edited by George Broderick, Jr.
First publication: Sep 1991

Little known fact: The Quantum Leap comic books were actually written and drawn two decades before the birth of their creators, which is the only reason they have been given a special temporal dispensation overriding the law that forbids post-1969 comic books in this list. In the first issue, Sam desperately wants to save Martin Luther King Jr., but he realizes that’s not the reason he’s in Memphis.

 He awoke to find himself in the past, suffering from partial amnesia and facing a mirror image that was not his own. 

[Dec 2010]

Back to the Future (Animated)
created by Bob Gale
First episode: 7 Sep 1991

After III, Doc Brown and Clara settle and raise a family in Hill Valley, though “settle” might be the wrong word when you once again have a working DeLorean.

 You do sorta look like that J. Michael Fox guy. 

[Sep 1991]

“Bad Timing”
by Molly Brown
First publication: Interzone, Dec 1991

When Alan’s coworker tells him that an old women’s magazine has a romance story called “The Love That Conquered Time” with Alan himself as the hero, he is dubious, but he reads the thing nonetheless.

 Youre the only reason, Claudia. I did it for you. I read a story that you wrote and I knew it was about me and that it was about you. I searched in the Archives and I found your picture and then I knew that I loved you and that I had always loved you and that I always would. 

[Apr 2014]

Murder Most Horrid
starring by Dawn French
First time travel: 5 Dec 1991

In this anthology series, Dawn French finds herself in one murder story after another, including one tale of a “Determined Woman” physicist who uses her time machine in an attempt to change the happenings of one particular murder.

 If you dont get out of this house, Im going to murder you! 

[May 2015]

“Down the River Road”
by Gregory Benford
First publication: After the King: Stories in Honor of J.R.R. Tolkien, Jan 1992

On the verge of becoming a man, John travels a river that is an admixture of time-flow and liquid metal—or possibly of magic and science—with the goal of finding out about a father whom he barely remembers.

 John followed the boot tracks away from the launch. They led inland, so there was no time pressure to fight. His clothes dried out as he walked beneath a shimmering patch of burnt-goald worldwall that hung tantalizingly behind roiling clouds. 

[Oct 2015]

Waxwork II: Lost in Time
by Anthony Hickox (Hickox, director)
First release: 16 Jun 1992

After the flaming climax at the end of Waxwork (which had no time travel that I could see), Mark and Sarah (a different actress) crawl home only to be followed by a disembodied hand that (before being garbage disposaled into tiny pieces) hacks Sarah’s nearly evil stepfather to death. Nobody at Sarah’s subsequent trial for murder believes that story, so after listening to a movie of dead Patrick Macnee, they escape into a series of bad horror movie remakes from Frankenstein to Aliens.

Of course, all these movies are set in different times, but is there any actual time travel? The final scene gives a definitive answer, although it does not manage to generate even half a star for my rating.

 We burned that place to the ground. Nothing could have got out. 

[Jul 2015]

Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventures (Live)
created by Darren Starr
First episode: 28 Jun 1992

The Two Great Ones become the two lame ones, although the Elvis episode has some redeeming factors.

 Its a completely creepy feeling to fail before a large group of Elvises. 

[Dec 2010]

“Two Guys from the Future”
by Terry Bisson
First publication: Omni, Aug 1992

Two guys from the future show up in an art gallery (to “salvage the works of art of your posteriors” because “no shit is fixing to hang loose any someday now.”) where they meet a security-guard-cum-artist and her boss, Mimsy.

 “We are two guys from the future.”
“Yeah, right. Now get the hell out of here!”
“Dont shoot! Is that a gun?”
That gave me pause; it was a flashlight.

[Jan 2015]

The Ugly Little Boy
aka Child of Time
novelization by Isaac Asimov and Robert Silverberg
First publication: Sep 1992

The story of Ms. Fellowes and Timmie is augmented by the story of what his tribe did during his time away.

 He was a very ugly little boy and Edith Fellowes loved him more dearly than anything in the world. 

[Nov 1992]

Darkwing Duck
created by Tad Stones
First time travel: 18 Sep 1992

The crimefighting duck (or his pals) time traveled at least five times, some of which used arch-nemesis Quackerjack’s Time Top (no word on whether it was stolen from Brick Bradford).

 Paraducks (18 Sep 1991)to earlier in DW’s life
Quack of Ages (18 Nov 1991)back to 1921
Time and Punishment (19 Nov 1991)    Gosalyn to the future
Inherit the Wimp (19 Sep 1992)DW’s ancestors to the present
Extinct Possibility (5 Dec 1992)to the time of the dinosaurs

 Need I remind you about the time with the floor wax, the peanut butter and my VCR? 

[Sep 1991]

The Guns of the South
by Harry Turtledove
First publication: Oct 1992

A faction from the early 21st century brings boatloads of AK-47 machine guns back to General Lee in the War between the States.

 My friends and I—everyone who belongs to America Will Break—come from a hundred and fifty years in your future. 

[Feb 2014]

Captain Planet and the Planeteers
aka The New Adventures of Captain Planet
created by Ted Turner and Barbara Pyle
First time travel: 31 Oct 1992

Gaia, the spirit of the Earth, sends out five magic rings which are obtained by teenagers who are then tasked with protecting the planet Earth, sometimes individually and sometimes by combining to call forth Captain Planet who (among other things) can even take them into the past (“OK at the Gunfight Corral”).

 There she is, boys: my own time machine. 

[Aug 2013]

Quantum Leap Novels
First book: Nov 1992

 The Novel (aka Carny Knowledge) (Nov 1992)   Ashley McConnell
Too Close for Comfort (Apr 1993)Ashley McConnell
The Wall (Jan 1994)Ashley McConnell
The Beginning (Jan 1994, UK)Julie Robitaille
The Ghost and the Gumshoe (Jan 1994, UK)Julie Robitaille
Prelude (Jun 1994)Ashley McConnell
Knights of Morningstar (Sep 1994)Melanie Rawn
Search and Rescue (Dec 1994)Melissa Crandall
Random Measures (Mar 1995)Ashley McConnell
Pulitzer (Jun 1995)L. Elizabeth Storm
Double or Nothing (Dec 1995)C.J. Henderson
Odyssey (Mar 1996)Barbara E. Walton
Independence (Aug 1996)John Peel
Angels Unaware (Jan 1997)L. Elizabeth Storm
Obsessions (Mar 1997)Carol Davis
Loch Ness Leap (Jul 1997)Sandy Schofield
Heat Wave (Nov 1997)Melanie Kent
Foreknowledge (Mar 1998)Christo Defillipis
Song and Dance (Oct 1998)Mindy Peterman
Mirror’s Edge (Feb 2000)Ester D. Reese

 “Oh, boy,” he whispered. 

[Sep 2013]

“The Battle of Long Island”
by Nancy Kress
First publication: Omni, Feb/Mar 1993

Major Susan Peters is in charge of all the nurses at “The Hole” where a series of soldiers from alternative past Revolutionary Wars keep appearing.

 Theyre often like this. They find themsleves in an alien, impossible, unimaginable place, surround by guards with uniforms and weapons they dont recognize, and yet their first concern is not their personal fate but the battle they left behind. 

[May 1993]

Bradbury Comics’ “A Sound of Thunder”
adapted by Richard Corben
First publication: Ray Bradbury Comics 1, Feb 1993

In addition to reprinting Williamson’s 1954 adaptation, Ray Bradbury Comics 1 had a new 12-page adaptation by Richard Corben.

 My god! It could reach up and grab the moon. 

[Jun 2011]

Groundhog Day
by Danny Rubin and Harold Ramis (Ramis, director)
First release: 12 Feb 1993

A jaded weatherman, Phil Connors (no relation to John Connor), is in Punxsutawney to cover the Groundhog Day goings-on, continually repeating the day and—after losing his jaded edge—striving for Rita’s heart.

 Youre not a god. You can take my word for it: This is twelve years of Catholic school talking. 

[Feb 1993]

Army of Darkness
by Sam Raimi and Ivan Raimi (Sam Raimi, director)
First release: 19 Feb 1993

A Connecticut Yankee (or maybe Michigan) in King Arthur's Court meets the Living Dead and their kin.

 This is my boom-stick. Its a 12-guage, double barreled Remington—S-marts top-of-the-line. Youll find them in the Sporting Goods Department. 

[Apr 2012]

X-Men Cartoon
created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby
First time travel: 13 Mar 1993

Even though the 1992 cartoon had all them new-fangled X-Men and their funky costumes, I still got some enjoyment from the Kirby-designed villians, such as the Sentinels in the two-part time-travel story, “Days of Future Past” (which, not coincidentally, will also be the name of the upcoming X-Men movie). Well, they were sort of Kirby-designed: He penciled the cover and sketched the layouts of X-Men 14.

 We rebels have a theory: If the assasination of the 90s never occurred . . . 

[Mar 1993]

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III:
Turtles in Time

adapted by Stuart Gillard (Gillard, director)
First release: 19 Mar 1993

Tim’s favorite reptiles (at age 8) moved from animated to live-action for the silver screen. For this third installment, the turtles’ human friend April swaps place with a 17th century Japanese prince, and the ninjas in a half shell head back to rescue her.

 Awesome! But do you think they had pizza back then? 

[Sep 2015]

“Just Like Old Times”
aka Seems Like Old Times
by Robert J. Sawyer
First publication: On Spec, Jun 1993

When serial killer Rudolph Cohen is convicted to die for his crimes, by transfering his consciousness into a previous nearly-dead being with no ability to control that being. He chooses a T. Rex. as the previous being, and it turns out that he can control it.

 We can project a human beings consciousness back in time, superimposing his or her mind overtop of that of someone who lived in the past. 

[Sep 2015]

by Lewis Shiner
First publication: Jul 1993

A weak marriage isn’t enough to sustain Ray Shackleford, but he doesn’t want to leave either, so he spends time in his mind wondering what various unmade albums would be like from the Beatles and other 60s bands (the Doors, the Beach Boys), and one day the music of those unmade albums starts coming from the speakers in his stereo repair shop.

 When I opened my eyes it was nighttime and I was crouched on the sidewalk in front of Brians house and it wasn't 1989 anymore. 

[Aug 2013]

by Richard Lupoff, Jonathan Heap, Richard Morton (Jack Sholder, director)
First aired: 5 Jul 1993 (made-for-tv)

Trapped in a one-day time loop, Barry Thomas tries to bring down the company that’s causing the loop, hopefully coming to a happy ending with the gorgeous scientist who runs the project.

 Barry: Oh my God. It’s twelve o’clock.
Lisa: No! We’ve got to do something!
Barry: There’s no time. Quick, tell me what your favorite color is. 

[Jan 2011]

The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr.
created by Jeffrey Boam and Carlton Cuse
First publication: 27 Aug 1993

In a steampunk old west, gunfighter Brisco County, Jr., and his sidekick Lord Bowler are hired to track down the maniacal time-traveler John Bly who, among other things, kill the senior Brisco County and seeks a powerful Orb from the future—plenty of excitement for the 27 episodes of its one season.

At least one Brisco time traveler from 5502 appears naked a la the terminator, but (as of 2015) Harlan Ellison hasn’t sue Brisco over the time-travel requirement.

 Brisco: Are you an angel? You look like an angel.
Karina: No. Im from the future. My name is Karina.
Brisco: And, uh, in the future youve kinda given up on clothes? 

[Jul 2015]

Time Machines: Time Travel in Physics, Metaphysics and Science Fiction
by Paul J. Nahin
First publication: Sep 1993
If you have only one reference book on your shelf—on any topic—this must be it. Get the second edition.

 This is, I believe, a book for the adventurous in spirit. 

[Dec 2008]

King Arthur and the Knights of Justice
created by Jean Chalopin
First episode: 13 Sep 1993

When the real King Arthur and his knights are put out of commission by the evil Morgana, Merlin brings a football player, Arthur King, and his teammates, the Knights, back as replacements for two seasons on this syndicated series.

 And then, from the field of the future, a new king will come to save the world of the past. 

[Jul 2013]

“The Girl with Some Kind of Past. And George.”
by William Tenn
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct 1993
A pretty, young time traveler from the future visits the most fascinating person she can think of in the past—that would be playboy George Rice, coincidentally her great-great-grandfather—but she won’t tell George what makes him so fascinating.

 That left the incest angle, and I asked him about that. He says that making it with your great-great-granddaughter from the twenty-first century is not much different from making it with your clothes-designer neighbor from across the hall. 

[Apr 2012]

Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog
created by Reed Shelly, Bruce Shelly, Phil Harnage and Kent Butterworth
First time travel: 26 Oct 1993

Video game character Sonic and his sidekick Tails repeatedly foil the evil Dr. Robotnik, including a four-part quest to the past where Robotnik seeks the four all-powerful chaos emeralds in the times of Blackbeard, King Arfur, Sonic’s ancestors and prehistory.

 Blackbot the Pirate (26 Oct 1993)to time of Blackbeard
Hedgehog of the Hound Table (27 Oct 1993)   to time of King Arfur
Robotnik’s Pyramid Scheme (28 Oct 1993)erasing Sonic’s family tree
Prehistoric Sonic (29 Oct 1993)to caveman times and elsewhere

 I cant go through with this. My theories of time and space were developed for peace, not for your evil schemes. 

[Sep 2012]

The Silurian Tales
by Steven Utley
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Nov 1993

I’ve read ten of Utley’s stories of an expedition plopped into the Silurian geologic period, the most recent of which, “The End in Eden,” tells the tale of customs agents Phil Morrow and Sal Shelton, living at the border between the Silurian period and the present, matching wits with NCIS and JAG officers over a case of possible smuggling of Paleolithic biological specimens.

 There and Then (Nov 1993)Asimovs
The Age of Mud and Slime (Mar 1996)Asimovs
A Silurian Tale (May 1996)Asimovs
The Wind Over the World (Oct/Nov 1996)Asimovs
The Real World (30 Aug 2000)Sci Fiction
Chain of Life (Oct/Nov 2000)Asimovs
The Despoblado (22 Nov 2000)Sci Fiction
Cloud by Van Gogh (Dec 2000)F&SF
Half a Loaf (Jan 2001)Asimovs
Five Miles from Pavement (21 Mar 2001)Sci Fiction
The World Without (Jul 2001)Asimovs
Walking in Circles (Jan 2002)Asimovs
Treading the Maze (Feb 2002)Asimovs
Foodstuff (Feb 2002)F&SF
Beyond the Sea (29 Aug 2002)Revolution SF
Exile (Aug 2003)Asimovs
Chaos and Gods (18 Aug 2003)Revolution SF
Invisible Kingdoms (Feb 2004)F&SF
Babel (Mar 2004)Analog
Another Continuum Heard From! (2 Apr 2004)  Revolution SF
A Paleozoic Palimpsest (Oct 2004)F&SF
The Wave-Function Collapse (Mar 2005)Asimovs
Promised Land (Jul 2005)F&SF
Silv’ry Moon (Oct/Nov 2005)F&SF
Diluvium (May 2006)F&SF
All of Creation (18 Jan 2008)Cosmos
The World Within the World (Mar 2008)Asimovs
The 400-Million-Year Itch (Apr 2008)F&SF
Variant (Summer 2008)Postscripts
The Woman Under the World (Jul 2008)Asimovs
Slug Hell (Sep 2008)Asimovs
Lost Places of Earth (Jan 2009)in We Think, Therefore We Are
The Tortoise Grows Elate (Mar/Apr 2012)F&SF
The End in Eden (Oct 2012)Analog
The Gift Horse (Fall 2012)in The 400-Million-Year Itch
Sidestep (Spring 2013)in Invisible Kingdoms

 Wheres he going to run to? Home is four hundred million miles away. 
—The End in Eden

[Dec 2013]

Philadelphia Experiment II
by Wallace C. Bennett, Don Jakoby, et. al. (Stephen Cornwell, director)
First release: 12 Nov 1993

At the end of the first movie, David Herdeg was left in 1983 America; ten years later, another experiment sends a nuclear bombed to 1943 Germany and David must go back to stop from creating a Nazi-ruled world.

 That plane got sucked back there. Landed in the heart of Nazi Germany. 

[Mar 2012]

Goodnight Sweetheart
created by Laurence Marks and Maurice Gran
First episode: 18 Nov 1993

Television repairman Gary Sparrow walks into a pub and meets a friendly barmaid in London during World War II, a spot where he repeatedly returns to escape a mundane life and loving but sometimes trying wife in 1993.

 Oh, I must say you might be takin’ this 1940s theme a bit too far. 

[Jul 2013]

We’re Back! A Dinosaur’s Story
adaptation by John Patrick Shanley
First release: 24 Nov 1993

Based on the children’s book of the same name, Rex tells the story of how he went from the Cretaceous to the modern-day golf course. The story is weak, but the animation and voices are better than the usual 90s fare.

 Greetings friends, and welcome to my shack. My name is Captain Neweyes, and I live in the far future where all the stars and all the planets have had to learn to get along. 

[Aug 2013]

by Scott Adams
First time travel: 19 Dec 1993

 Make sure nothing changes because of my visit or it will kill everyone in the future. 

“Another Story or
a Fisherman of the Inland Sea”

by Ursula K. Le Guin
First publication: A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994)

At 18, Hideo leaves his family and his planet, O, to become part of a group that invents instantaneous tranportation—a device that ends up taking him back to the time that he first left Planet O

 So: once upon a time when I was twenty-one years old I left my home and came on the NAFAL ship Terraces of Darranda to study at the Ekumenical Schools on Hain. 

[Jul 2011]

“Women on the Brink of a Cataclysm”
by Molly Brown
First publication: Interzone, Jan 1994

Joanna, a successful sculptor in New York, agrees to be the traveler for her friend Toni’s time machine, but what neither of them knows is that any travel backward in time will start an avalanche of various artist Joannas going back and forth between alternate universes.

 “Even if youve found a way, Im not going back,” she said. “No way am I going back. Ever. This is my life now, my world, and I like it. Though . . .” She paused a moment, and her face—my face—crumpled into a mass of lines. Oh God, I thought, I dont look as old as her, do I? She blinked hard, several times, as if she was trying not to cry. “Hows Katie? Is she all right?” 

[Jul 2015]

“The Tourist”
by Paul Park
First publication: Interzone, Feb 1994

Once the time-travel tourist business gets going, there’s no stopping it, not to mention all those travelers who feel they have business with Hitler or Stalin—which brings about an interesting theory of time not being a continuum at all, all told through the personal lens of one recently divorced man who buys a ticket for Paleolithic Spain and sets out after his ex-wife.

 We just cant keep our hands off, and as a result, Cuba has invaded prehistoric Texas, the Empire of Ashok has become a Chinese client state, and Napoleon is in some kind of indirect communication with Genghis Khan. 

[Apr 2014]

The Quantum Physics of Time Travel
by David Deutsch and Michael Lockwood
First publication: Scientific American, Mar 1994

I propose that all writers of time travel fiction should be required to read certain articles, and this is the first. Deutsch and Lockwood do an admirable job of describing the well-known Grandfather Paradox and the lesser known paradox of the causal loop (in which, for example, an art critic brings a book of famous paintings back to the artist before the time when the paintings were painted, and this book then inspires those very paintings, leaving the question of who created the paintings).

The article then tries to unwind these paradoxes in classical physics, where there is but one universe. In this universe, a time traveler who returns to the past can do nothing except that which was already done. For example, the traveler simply cannot kill his or her own grandfather before Grandpa meets Grandma because we know (by the birth of the traveler) that that didn’t happen. So, something in the universe must stop the murder. Things must happen as they happened.

But, say Deutsch and Lockwood, this conspiracy of the universe to preserve consistency violates the Autonomy Principle, according to which “it is possible to create in our immediate environment any configuration of matter that the laws of physics permit locally, without reference to what the rest of the universe may be doing.” In other words, if it’s physically possible for the traveler to point a gun at Grandpa, then the fact that elsewhen in the universe Grandpa must knock up Grandma cannot interfere with the traveler’s ability to pull the trigger.

Deutsch and Lockwood use the Autonomy Principle to reject something, but it’s classical physics they reject, not time travel. In a similar way, for stories that rely on a Causal Loop Paradox, Deutsch and Lockwood ask: Just where did the original idea of the paintings come from? They reject that the paintings might have come from nowhere (TANSTAAFL!), and again they reject classical physics.

Personally, I hope that time travel writers don’t fully embrace the Autonomy Principle and TANSTAAFL, because I want more wonderful stories where, in fact, there is but one history of events, the future and past may both be fixed, free will is an illusion, and free lunches exist. Hooray for “—All You Zombies—”!

But with classical physics banned, what else is there? Deutsch and Lockwood turn to Everett’s Many Worlds model wherein each collapse of the quantum wave function results in a new universe. When a time traveler goes to the past, they say, the arrival of the traveler creates a new multiverse, and this multiverse does not need to act the same as the original. Grandpa can die! The artist can be given inspiration from an artist doppleganger in the original universe!

Noteably, though, Deutsch and Lockwood never discuss how time travel might cause the same kind of universe splitting as the collapse of the wave function, but never mind. What they do discuss is how the new universe must respond to changes, and many stories where changing the past is possible fall down on this account. For example, if you change the past so that the reason for your trip to the past no longer exists, then when you return to the present you should find a new version of yourself who never considered traveling to the past. Multiverse time travelers should read this article just to understand that the present they return to may very well have another versin of themselves. Two Marty McFlies!

One final note: Of course we don’t live in a classical physics universe. That's clear from the many experiments that support quantum physics. But living in a quantum world doesn’t immediately imply Many Worlds. Could time travel exist in a single quantum universe? Or does it? For thoughts on that, check out the online “Scientific American article “Time Travel Simulation Resolves Grandfather Paradox” by Lee Billings.

 In the art critic story, quantum mechanics allows events, from the participants perspective, to occur much as Dummett describes. The universe that the critic comes from must have been one in which the artist did, eventually, learn to paint well. In that universe, the pictures were produced by creative effort, and reproductions were later taken to the past of another universe. There the paintings were Indeed plagiarized—if one can be said to plagiarize the work of another version of oneself—and the painter did get \“some- thing for nothing.” But there is no para- dox, because now the existence of the pictures was caused by genuine creative effort, albeit in another universe. 

[Aug 2013]

Time Chasers
aka Tangents
by David Giancola (Giancola, director)
First release: 17 Mar 1994

Before watching this movie (about amateur inventor Nick Miller’s time machine in a two-prop plane and the evil corporation that tries to take it over), I never realized that the word “unwatchable” had degrees. Of course, the movie itself is unwatchable, but in a genuinely inoffensive, cultish way; the self-absorbed add-on commentary from the Mystery Science Theater 3000 hosts who presented it in 1997 on early-morning tv is categorically unwatchable.

 You brought us up here this morning to look at your—time machine?! 

[May 2013]

Babylon 5
created by J. Michael Straczynski
First time travel: 10 Aug 1994

In the 23rd century, a space station serves as a crossroads for humans, aliens, and science fiction tropes including, of course, time travel.

I was never drawn into this program in the way I was for Next Generation, Voyager, and even DS9. I think that’s partly because of weak dialog and acting and also, for me, the cast of characters never created interrelationships that felt like a family.

 Babylon Squared (10 Aug 1994)Babylon 4 unstuck in time
Comes the Inquisitor (25 Oct 1995)man from 1888 London
War Without End (13-20 May 1996)back to Babylon 4

 This is nuts! A station doesnt just disappear and then reappear four years later like some kind of Flying Dutchman. 
—“Babylon Squared”

[Jul 2015]

The Magic School Bus
by Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen
First time travel: 8 Sep 1994

In The Magic School Bus in the Time of the Dinosaurs, Miss Frizzle and her charges turn the bus into a time machine that takes them to the Triassic, the Jurassic, and the Cretaceous. The bus had several other adventures in time, too, although not all by Cole and Degen.

 Dinosaur Detectives (2002)Chapter Book 9
At the First Thanksgivingby Joanna Cole
Builds the Statue of Libertyby Anne Capeci
Flies with Dinosaursby Martin Schwabacher
Ancient Egypt (2001)Mrs. Frizzle 1
Medieval Castle (2003)Mrs. Frizzle 2
Imperial China (2005)Mrs. Frizzle 3

 Class, were in the late triassic period—the time of the early dinosaurs! 

[Jun 2015]

by Mark Verheiden (Peter Hyams, director)
First release: 14 Sep 1994

When I was a teen, my friends and I (hi Dan and Paul) produced a fanzine called Free Fall. What’s that got to do with Timecop? For a short time, I was part of a group called APA 5, which Paul introduced me to. We would all send our fanzines to a central location, where they would be collated and the resulting giant fanzine sent back to each of us—one of whom was the eventual Hollywood writing success, Mark Verheiden. Oh, and in this movie, Time Enforcement Commission agent Van Damme goes back in time to blow lots of stuff up in hopes of saving his already-blown-up wife.

 I cant tell you anything. Hell send somebody back to wipe out my grandparents. Itll be like Ive never existed. My mother, my father, my wife, my kids, my fucking cat. 

[Sep 2012]

The Simpsons
created by Matt Groening
First time travel: 30 Oct 1994

Homer’s first time travel was part of the fifth Halloween montage in a segment called “Time and Punishment” (aka “Homer’s Time Travel Nightmare”) where each tiny dinosaur he stomps on alters his own life. The next bit I saw was Professor Frink, who built and used the chronotrike in “Springfield Up,” attempting to tell his young self to choose a different career.

 Treehouse of Horror V (30 Oct 1994)Butterfly Effect spoof
Springfield Up (18 Feb 2007)Frink’s chronotrike
Treehouse of Horror XXIII (7 Oct 2012)   Back to the Future spoof

 Homer: [to self] Okay, dont panic! Remember the advice Dad gave you on your wedding day.
Grandpa: [in flashback] If you ever travel back in time, dont step on anything, because even the slightest change can alter the future in ways you cant imagine. 

[Oct 1994]

Dog City
produced by Jim Henson Productions
First time travel: 12 Nov 1994

This combined animation/muppet show from Jim Hensen Productions gets an extra half star just because the main characters are all dogs, one of who explains how a time machine has completely altered Dog City in the episode “Future Schlock’ (12 Nov 1994).

 Due to the use of a time machine, events were changed in Dog City’s past, which naturally affected Dog City’s future, which was Dog City’s present, of course. 

[Jan 2014]

Tim’s stash, still in the garage.

The Goosebumps Books
by R.L. Stine
First time travel: Jan 1995

Tim was seven when the Goosebumps books first arrived, the perfect age to be creeped out by R.L. Stine (although Tim preferred the Animorphs). At least three of the original series had some time travel, as did many of the later Give Yourself Goosebumps books. Much of the time travel in those choose-your-own-adventure style of books occurred in alternative endings.

 A Night in Terror Tower (Jan 1995)Goosebumps 27
The Cuckoo Clock of Doom (Feb 1995)Goosebumps 28
Escape from the Carnival of Horrors (Jul 1995)G.Y.G. 1
Tick Tock, You’re Dead (Nov 1995)G.Y.G. 2
Trapped in Bat Wing Hall (Dec 1995)G.Y.G. 3
The Knight in Screaming Armor (Sep 1996)G.Y.G. 9
Vampire Breath (Nov 1996)Goosebumps 49
Deep in the Jungle of Doom (Nov 1996)G.Y.G. 11
Scream of the Evil Genie (Jan 1997)G.Y.G. 13
The Twisted Tale of Tiki Island (Sep 1997)G.Y.G. 21
Return to the Carnival of Horror (Oct 1997)G.Y.G. 22
Return to Terror Tower (May 1998)G.Y.G. Special 2
Revenge of the Body Squeezers (Jun 1999)G.Y.G. Special 6
Into the Twistor of Terror (Aug 1999)G.Y.G. 38
Danger Time (Jan 2000)G.Y.G. 41
Heads You Lose! (May 2010)Horrorland 15

 It must have been my wish, I thought.
My birthday wish.
After Tara tripped me and I fell on my cake, I wished I could go back in time and start my birthday all over again.
Somehow my wish came true.
Wow! I thought. This is kind of cool.

[Jul 2015]

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller
First time travel: 2 Jan 1995

Seven seasons with nine time-travel episodes including the most troublesome “Trials and Tribble-ations.”

 Past Tense I/II (2/9 Jan 1995)back 300 years
Visionary (2 Feb 1995)jump forward several hours
The Visitor (9 Oct 1995)Sisko skips through timelines
Little Green Men (13 Nov 1995)to 1947 Roswell
Accession (26 Feb 1996)Akorem, a poet from 200 years past
Trials and Tribble-ations (4 Nov 1996)take a good guess
Children of Time (5 May 1997)Defiant crew visit their descendants
Wrongs Darker than Death . . . (1 Apr 1998)   Kira back to mother’s time

 We do not discuss it with outsiders. 
—Worf in “Trials and Tribble-ations”

[Jan 1993]

Star Trek: Voyager
created by Rick Berman, Michael Piller and Jeri Taylor
First time travel: 30 Jan 1995

Seven seasons with 12 time-travel episodes, two of which featured Kess’s namesake, Kes.

 Time and Again (30 Jan 1995)back one day to save a planet
Eye of the Needle (20 Feb 1995)contact an old Romulan ship
Future’s End I/II (13/20 Nov 1996)   back to 1900s via 2900 AD technology
Before and After (9 Apr 1997)Kes skips through her life
Year of Hell I/II (5/12 Nov 1997)Krenim temporal ship
Timeless (18 Nov 1998)15 years in the future
Relativity (12 May 1999)Seven becomes a time cop
Fury (3 May 2000)Kes wants to change her past
Shattered (17 Jan 2001)Chakotay steps between times
Endgame (23 May 2001)future Voyager hatches a plan

 As they say in the Temporal Mechanics Department: Theres no time like the present. 

[Dec 2010]

From Time to Time
by Jack Finney
First publication: Feb 1995
Finney’s sequel to Time and Again initially finds Si Morley living a happy life in the 19th century with his 19th century family, while The Project in the future never even got started because he prevented the inventor’s parents from ever meeting. But vague memories linger in some of the Project member’s minds, and Morley can’t stay put.

 Theyre back there in the past, trampling around, changing things, aren t they? They dont know it. Theyre just living their happy lives, but changing small events. Mostly trivial, with no important effects. But every once in a while the effect of some small changed event moves on down to the&mdash 

[Sep 2012]

Lois and Clark
created by Deborah Joy LeVine
First time travel: 26 Mar 1995

Four seasons with 7 time-travel episodes:

 Tempus Fugitive (26 Mar 1995)to 1966 (H.G. Wells, Tempus)
And the Answer Is . . . (21 May 1995)time traveler’s diary (Tempus)
Tempus Anyone? (21 Jan 1996)future alternate universe, Tempus
Soul Mates (13 Oct 1996)back to prevent a curse
’Twas the Night before Mxymas (15 Dec 1996)   Christmas Eve time loop
Meet John Doe (2 Mar 1997)future Tempus runs for president
Lois and Clarks (9 Mar 1997)future Tempus traps Clark

 Lois, did you know that in the future you're revered at the same level as Superman? Why, there are books about you, statues, an interactive game—youre even a breakfast cereal. 

[Sep 1993]

The Outer Limits (2nd Series)
created by Leslie Stevens
First publication: 5 May 1995

Sadly, this revival (which outlasted the original by more than 100 episodes) was shown mostly on cable, so I didn’t see many of the first airings. But as I was writing up this listing, I realized that between the two runs of The Outer Limits, three runs of The Twilight Zone, one season of Tales of Tomorrow, and a handful of other miscellaneous episodes of weird anthology series, we could easily put together a full season of a new anthology show: The Time Travel Zone Limts. After one season, the network will be ours, and we can continue for many happy seasons into the future.

 Virtual Future (5 May 1995)time travel or v.r.?
Stitch in Time (14 Jan 1996)murderer with a time machine
Falling Star (30 Jun 1996)pop music fan from the future
Vanishing Act (21 Jul 1996)aliens unintentionally time travel
Tribunal (14 May 1999)to Nazi concentration camps (Prentice)
Breaking Point (18 Feb 2000)time traveler to wife’s death
Decompression (30 Jun 2000)time traveler vs. politician
Gettysburg (28 Jul 2000)to U.S. Civil War (Prentice)
Time to Time (11 Aug 2001)woman to father’s death (Prentice)
Final Appeal (3 Sep 2000)Stitch in Time continuation
Patient Zero (23 Mar 2001)attempt to prevent deadly virus
Abduction (18 Aug 2001)teens vs alien (with 2s of time travel)

 There is nothing wrong with your television. Do not attempt to adjust the picture. We are now controlling the transmission. We control the horizontal and the vertical. We can deluge you with a thousand channels or expand one single image to crystal clarity and beyond. We can shape your vision to anything our imagination can conceive. For the next hour, we will control all that you see and hear. You are about to experience the awe and mystery which reaches from the deepest inner mind to . . . The Outer Limits! 

[Jan 1996]

The Langoliers
adapted by Tom Holland
First aired: 14-15 May 1995 (made-for-tv)

As in Stephen King’s novella of the same name, this two-night made-for-tv movie follows the ten people who find that they’re the only ones left on board a transcontinental flight. Even after they land, nobody else is on the ground. In order of importance, the movie’s about (1) the characters, (2) horror, and (3) a little speculative fiction. In the end, the resolution involving time is the same as in the book.

 Ive been sitting here, running all these old stories through my head, you know: time warps, space warps, alien raiding parties. I mean, we really dont know if theres anything left down there, do we? 

[Oct 2015]

A Young Connecticut Yankee
in King Arthur’s Court

by Frank Encarnacao and Ralph L. Thomas (Thomas, director)
First aired: 27 May 1995 (made-for-tv)

Michael York plays Merlin to teenage rock-and-roll hopeful Hank Morgan is zapped back to the round table Mark-Twain-style by a wonky speaker.

 Lancelot? This is awesome. 

[Jan 2015]

“Time’s Revenge”
by Pauline Ashwell
First publication: Analog, Jun 1995
A housewife has a chance encounter with a time-traveler who deals in ancient artifacts, after which the two of them have time-to-time encounters.

 I had not realised how important the Time Travelers visits had become in my pleasant, prosperous, humdrum existence. 

[Dec 2013]

The Time-Traveling Terraformers Stories
by Pauline Ashwell
First story: Analog, Aug 1995
Sandy Jennings, an orphan and a red-headed Ph.D. student in microbiology, is recruited into a terraforming project by a group of several hundred time travelers who work in a loosely defined, non-authoritarian structure that spans years of their lifetimes and eons of the planet’s time. Sandy is not seen in the third and fourth stories, which show nick-of-time recruitments of vulcanologist Simon Hardacre and plankton expert Haru.

I liked these last two stories, especially the character of Haru, but I longed for more development beyond what Sandy had already shown us of their common universe.

 Hunted Head (Aug 1995)Analog
One Thousand Years (May 2000)   Analog
Out of Fire (Mar 2001)Analog
Elsewhere (Jun 2001)Analog

 Knowledge, absolute and definite knowledge of the future as it affects yourself, is never any use. Whether it is bad or good, you cannot do anything that will change it. It simply takes away your power to decide. 

[Sep 2012]

A Kid in King Arthur’s Court
by Michael Part and Robert L. Levy (Michael Gottlieb, diretor)
First release: 11 Aug 1995

This time around, the Yankee is failed little-leaguer Calvin Fuller who’s pulled back to Camelot where we see him with a flashlight, a Walkman, roller blades, superglue, a mountain bike with training wheels, bubble gum, karate, a candy bar, a Swiss Army knife, an aging Arthur and a pretty young princess.

 Swiss Army knife! The very name conjurs up greatness! 

[Jul 2015]

“The Chronology Protection Case”
by Paul Levinson
First publication: Analog, Sep 1995

When six of seven physicists (plus one pretty wife) in a time-travel research group meet untimely ends, forensic examiner Phil D’Amato suspects that a paradox-paranoid universe is looking out for itself.

 The drive back to Westchester was harrowing. Two cars nearly side swiped me, and one big-ass truck stopped so suddenly in front of me that I had all I could do to swerve out of crashing into it and becoming an instant Long Island Expressway pancake. 

[Nov 1996]

Star Trek: Gargoyles
created by Greg Weisman
First time travel: 14 Sep 1995

What’s that? You didn’t realize that Tim’s favorite childhood cartoon was part of the Star Trek universe? And I suppose you also believe that Doc Brown had nothing to do with Brownian motion?! According to the creator, this universe has a fixed time line in which you may travel but not change things—what he calls “working paradoxes,” though my memory holds only one time-travel episode, “Vows” (14 Sep 1995).

 You may have prevented me from altering the past, but you failed too. You see I have clear memories of your little inspirational about keeping my vows of love. I never forgot it. Obviously history is immutable. 

[Sep 1994]

The Magic School Bus
created by Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen
First time travel: 23 Sep 1995

Apart from “The Busasaurus,” in which The Magic School Bus in the Time of Dinosaurs comes to the little animated screen (although only with the Cretaceous period), I don’t know whether Miss Frizzle and her charges ever took any other trips through time.

 To really understand a dinosaur, you really need to walk in its shoes. 

[Jun 2015]

Mirror, Mirror
created by Poise Graeme-Evans
First episode: 30 Sep 1995

Troubled 14-year-old Jo Tiegan is given a mirror that lets her visit back-and-forth with another girl who lives in her very bedroom in 1919 New Zealand.

 I was just positioning the mirror for your daughter. . . . Jo, you must leave it right there. Its right for it to be there. By tomorrow morning, youll understand. 

[May 2015]

Josh Kirby Movies
aka Josh Kirby . . . Time Warrior
first movie by Paul Callisi, Ethan Reiff and Cyrus Voris (Ernest D. Farino, director)
First movie: 24 Oct 1995

Fourteen-year-old boy Josh Kirby teams with alien girl Azabeth Siege to have world-saving vhs adventures in time.

 Chapter 1, Planet of the Dino-Knights (24 Oct 1995)
Chapter 2, The Human Pets (31 Oct 1995)
Chapter 3, Trapped on Toyworld (21 Nov 1995)
Chapter 4, Eggs from 70 Million B.C. (19 Dec 1995)
Chapter 5, Journey to the Magic Cavern (16 Apr 1996)
Chapter 6, Last Battle for the Universe (21 May 1996)

 Irwin 1138: Luckily, I had just perfected a chrono-displacement device capable of launching inanimate objects into the fourth dimension.
Josh: Wait! You invented a time machine?
Irwin 1138: Isnt that just what I said? 

[Oct 2015]

Goosebumps TV Show
developed by Deborah Forte
First time travel: 3 Nov 1995

R.L. Stine’s creepy kids’ books translated to tv, but for me, the pace on the small screen was always slow. A couple episodes had definite time travel, and some of the episodes were filmed in Bellevue, WA, where I went to junior high school, but I haven’t recognized any landmarks.

 The Cuckoo Clock of Doom (3 Nov 1995)redo birthday
A Night in Terror Tower (25 Feb 1996)English castle

 So Tara has never been born. I suppose there’s some way to go back in time to get her, right? I guess I probably ought to do that. And I will . . . one of these days. 
—“The Cuckoo Clock of Doom”

[Jul 2015]

The Busy World of Richard Scarry
created by Richard Scarry
First time travel: 1996

In one Busytown episode, two of Richard Scarry’s cheerful characters, Huckle Cat and Lowly Worm, are accidentally taken back to Colonial Busytown by Mr. Fix-It’s Tardis-like time machine. Fortunately, Mr. Fix-It’s ancestor helps them fix the broken lever in the time machine (even before today’s Mr. Fix-It can rescue them in another familiar looking time machine).

 This isnt any old elevator, boys. Its a time machine! This is for traveling through time. 

[Sep 2015]

Dinosaur Valley Girls
by Donald F. Glut (Glut, director)
First release: circa 1996

Afterction-movie hero Tony Markham is tossed by a magic talisman into a time of dinosaurs, cavemen, and sex-starved cavewomen who shave their legs with clam shells (including one named Buf-Fee). Someday I must decide whether movies with simultaneous dinosaurs and cavemen can be classified as time travel or must always be relegated to mere fantasy.

 That skull you saw, those slabs and more, are all carbon-dated at less than a million years old. My only explanation is that there once existed a place I call Dinosaur Valley, where unknown forces somehow brought together creatures from different times and places. 

[Sep 2015]

12 Monkeys
by David Peoples and Janet Peoples (Terry Gilliam, director)
First release: 5 Jan 1996

In the year 2035 with the world devastated by an artificially engineered plague, convict James Cole is sent back in time to gather information about the plague’s origin so the scientists can figure out how to fight it.

 And what we say is the truth is what everybody accepts. Right, Owen? I mean, psychiatry: its the latest religion. We decide whats right and wrong. We decide whos crazy or not. Im in trouble here. Im losing my faith. 

[Dec 2010]

The Redemption of Christopher Columbus

by Orson Scott Card
First publication: 1996

Diko, a second-generation researcher in a project that observes the past, discovers that it’s actually possible to send objects to the past and that a previous timeline did just this to alter Christopher Columbus’s fate; now, Diko and two others propose a further alteration that involves three travelers going to the 15th century.

 All of history was available, it seemed, and yet Pastwatch had barely scratched the surface of the past, and most watchers looked forward to a limitless future of rummaging through time. 

[May 2011]

Johnny and the Bomb
by Terry Pratchett
First publication: Apr 1996
In this third book of the series, teenaged Johnny Maxwell and his yahoo friends uses Mrs. Tachyon’s shopping trolley to travel through time to World War II.

  . . . if you go mad, do you know youve gone mad? If you dont, how do you know youre not mad? 

[Jul 2011]

created by Everett Peck
First time travel: 20 Apr 1996

Seinfeld’s pal, George Costanza, lends his voice to private detective, lousy family man, and general lech Eric Tiberius Duckman, who in one amusing episode was visited by multiple future selfs warning him of multiple future mistakes.

 Actually, it seems that while trying to set the alarm on my clock radio, I may have ripped a hole in the time-space continuum. 
—Ajax in “The Once and Future Duck”

[Aug 2013]

Dexter’s Laboratory
created by Genndy Tartakovsky
First time travel: 28 Apr 1996

Boy Genius Dexter makes amazing invention after amazing invention including a time machine that his annoying sister Dee Dee first used in the first episode, “DeeDeemensional.” I enjoyed the way it ended.

 Deedeemensional (28 Apr 1996)   Dee Dee goes back an hour
Ego Trip (10 Dec 1999)destroys terminator robots and visits future

 If there were a message that was so important it required time travel, I certainly would not send my idiot sister. 
—Dexter to Dee Dee in “Deedeemensional”

[Aug 2013]

“Time Travelers Never Die”
by Jack McDevitt
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, May 1996
Dave Dryden and his pal Shel have a great life traveling through time, visiting with Napolean and DaVinci, until Shel dies. Or does he?

I was lucky enough to meet Jack McDevitt at Jim Gunn’s workshop in Lawrence. He was always encouraging, kind, insightful and upbeat—for me, the best of the resident writers at the workshop.

 Time travel should not be possible in a rational universe. 

[May 1996]

created by Peter Orton and Ellia Den
First time travel: mid-1996

Wishbone, our favorite imaginative dog, is an different literary adventurer during every episode, including one scarey 1996 tale (“Bark to the Future”) where he became the traveller. The kids loved this show, especially Hannah (and me).

 This is the problem with time. I’m hungry now, but snack time is later. Why can’t later be now? 

[Jul 1996]

Early Edition
created by Bob Brush
First episode: 28 Sep 1996

A calico cat brings Gary tomorrow’s newspaper every morning—and at least two episodes in the four seasons sent softspoken Gary back in time (to the Chicago Fire in “Hot Time in the Old Time” and to the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre in “Everybody Goes to Rick’s). Go Gary!

One of the reasons this show appealed to me is the occurrence of a strong, introverted lead character, which is a rarity in all fiction.

 What if, by some magic, you found the power to really change things? People, events, maybe even your life. Would you even know where to start? Maybe you can’t know. Until it happens. 

[Sep 1996]

Richie Rich Cartoon
by Gary Conrad, Robert Schecter and Alicia Marie Schudt
First time travel: 5 Oct 1996

In the 1962 Richie Rich comic book, the poor little rich kid had an actual time machine, but in the 1996 cartoon (“Back in the Saddle”), he and Gloria just find themselves back in the old west with no machinations needed, where they meet Reggie the Kid.

 Richie, look at the date! June 1896! 

[Apr 2013]

Star Trek: First Contact
by Gene Roddenberry, Rick Berman, Brannon Braga, et. al. (Jonathan Frakes, director)
First release: 22 Nov 1996

Picard and the Enterprise travel back to 2063 to stop the Borg from preventing Zefram Cochrane’s invention of the warp drive.

 Assimilate this! 

[Nov 1996]

“Crossing into the Empire”
by Robert Silverberg
First publication: David Copperfield’s Beyond Imagination, Dec 1996
Mulreany is a trader who travels back to 14th century Byzantium with Coca-Cola and other treats.

 One glance and Mulreany has no doubt that the version of the capital that has arrived on this trip is the twelfth-century one. 

[Mar 2006]

Merlin’s Shop of Mystical Wonders
by Kenneth J. Berton (Berton, director)
First release: a forgetable day in 1996

A grandfather tells his grandson two stories about Merlin coming to the present day to set up the eponymous mystical shop. Other than that, though, no time traveling.

 Grandpa: You know, actually, that toy monkey reminds me of a story I once wrote for television. Lets see, what was it? Of course: Merlin!
Grandkid: Merlin?
Grandpa: Merlin the sorcerer. Only it didnt take place in the time with King Arthur. You see, Merlin used his powers to come to our time, to set up a shop of mystical wonders for all to see. 

[Oct 2015]

by M. Hamilton-Wright, R. Strauss and P. Badger (Louis Morneau, director)
First release: 1 Jan 1997

Kylie keeps going back to the same time in order to stop a psycho killer who has almost as many lives as a Terminator.

 This is about you takin’ hold of your life, codependent no more. 

[Apr 2011]

Future War
by David Hue and Dom Magwilli (Anthony Doublin, director)
First release: 28 Jan 1997

There’s only one scenario better than having a human slave escaping from the cyborgs of the future and being tracked across present-day Earth by dinosaurs from the past: having all that plus being lampooned on Mystery Science Theater 3000.

 From the future traveled a master race of Cyborgs. They made abductions from Earths past. The dinosaurs were trained as trackers. The humans were bred as slaves. Now a runaway slave escapes to a place his people call heaven . . . we know it as Earth. 

[Oct 2015]

The Company Stories
by Kage Baker and Kathleen Bartholomew
First story: Asimov’s, Mar 1997

I’ve read five of Kage Baker’s highly acclaimed stories about a group of entrepreneurial time travelers from the 24th century, the first of which was “Noble Mold” in Mar 1977. Of those, my favorite was “The Likely Lad” about young Alec Checkerfield, abandoned by his blue-blood parents to be raised by the hired help; he longs for adventure on the high seas, which he does obtain—but to be honest, I didn’t think it was via time travel. (Perhaps none of the five Checkerfield stories have time travel, even though isfdb indicates that they’re set in the Company Universe; I shall have to read “The Likely Lad” again!).

In 2012, the first of the Company stories co-authored with Kathleen Bartholomew appeared.

 For a while I lived in this little town by the sea. Boy, it was a soft job. Santa Barbara had become civilized by then: no more Indian rebellions, no more pirates storming up the beach, nearly all the grizzly bears gone. Once in a while some bureaucrat from Mexico City would raise hell with us, but by and large the days of the old Missions were declining into forlorn shades, waiting for the Yankees to come. 

[Mar 1997]

Files of the Time Rangers
by Richard Bowes
First story: Bending the Landscape: Fantasy, Mar 1997

I’ve read several of the Time Rangers’ stories, including “Straight to My Lover”s Heart’, in which a ranger named Raz (aka Cupid) takes two time-traveling children under his wings—not literal wings, although they could well have been, given the stories’ backdrop of ancient meddling gods.

 In the House of the Man in the Moon (Mar 1997)in Bending the Landscape
Diana in the Spring (Aug 1998)F&SF
From the Files of the Time Rangers (6 Sep 2000)Sci Fiction
Straight to My Lover’s Heart (Summer 2001)Black Gate
The Quicksilver Kid (17 Jan 2001)Sci Fiction
The Ferryman’s Wife (May 2001 )F&SF
Days Red and Green (14 Nov 2001)Sci Fiction
The Mask of the Rex (May 2002)F&SF
Godfather Death (23 Oct 2002)Sci Fiction
From the Files of the Time Rangers (2005)fix-up novel

 Razs specialty is outcasts of Time. Runaways. Fugitives. Ones who cant go home on holidays, because home hasnt been built yet. Or its a place that's long gone or never was. 

[Apr 2004]

Crime Traveller
created by Anthony Horowitz
First episode: 1 Mar 1997

Unconventional detective Jeff Slade becomes even more unconventional when cute nerd Holly Turner reveals the limited time machine left to her by her lost-in-time father.

 If something has happened, it will happen. 

[Aug 2012]

The Loose Ends Stories
by Paul Levinson
First story: Analog, May 1997
Time traveler and history meddler Jeff Harris aims for the 1980s to prevent the Challenger explosion, but instead finds himself in the time of JFK, meets the love of his life, meets other time travelers, toys with the idea of assassinating Nixon and Andropov, and eventually does alter Challenger’s history with unintended consequences for the Soviet Union.

 Loose Ends (May 1997)Analog
Little Differences (Jun 1998)   Analog
Late Lessons (Oct 1999)Analog

 Do you think that, if someone had a mind to do it—if someone really wanted to and had the connections—that someone back in 1982 to 1984 could have forced Andropov from office—could have replaced him with someone not so dictatorial? 

[Aug 2012]

When Time Expires
by David Bourla (Bourla, director)
First release: 10 May 1997

Discredited interplanetary time traveler Travis Beck has been relegated to a routine calibration task in a sleepy desert town (where it rains a lot). But excitement arises in the form of a pretty local waitress, Travis’s ex-partner Luke Skywalker, and a team of assassins who have Travis in their crosshairs.

 The Ministry says if I work as an investifator for a couple of years, keep a low profile, not get in any trouble, then theyll consider me for real work again. 

[Jul 2015]

by Peter Crowther
First publication: First Contact, Jul 1997

I wouldn’t have used the word palindromic to describe the happenings of this story: Aliens arrive in 1964, and their sense of time is backward from ours. It’s not palindromic because they experience the events in backward order: If I spell out the word time, they will hear e-m-i-t. It would be cool, however, to have a real palindromic story where some sequence of events in reverse is the same as that sequence experienced forward, like the expression emit time.

P.S. I just stumbled across another time travel story that is an actual palindrome! Click the
Related: link above!

 He seemed to be trying hard to find the right word. “Theyre palindromic.” 

[Apr 2014]

adapted by James V. Hart and Michael Goldberg (Robert Zemeckis, director)
First release: 11 Jul 1997

Jodie Foster creates a convincing Ellie in this big screen release of Sagan’s novel.

 You want to classify prime numbers now? 

[Jul 2009]

Redux Riding Hood
by Dan O’Shannon (Steve Moore, director)
First release: 5 Aug 1997

Five years after the fact, Wolf is still haunted by the debacle that followed after his slip of the tongue (“All the better to eat you with”) gave the game away to Red, even though his wife Doris begs him to forget about it and move on with his life.

 Its a time machine. Dont you see? Now I can go back and have another shot at Little Red Riding Hood. 

[Jul 2013]

Lurid Tales: The Castle Queen
by Randall Fontana (Ellen Cabot, director)
First release: 26 Aug 1997

Economics student Tom Dunsmore has no clue what he’ll write his paper on. One potential topic is the reign of Charles I, but the video arcade/house-of-ill-repute down the street beckons. Fortunately, the also has an advanced chair that takes him back to a 17th century England and a castle full of sex-starved sisters who would do anything—absolutely anything—to keep their land out of the hands of the the Stuart king himself.

 So its some sort of new V.R. rig, is that it? 

[Oct 2015]

Safety Not Guaranteed Classified Ad
by John Silveira
First publication: Backwoods Home Magazine, Sep/Oct 1997

 Wanted: Somebody to go back in time with me.                     This is not a joke. 

The Sticky Fingers of Time
by Hilary Brougher (Brougher, director)
First release: 9 Sep 1997

After watching an H-bomb test in 1952, frustrated writer Tucker Harding finds herself in 1997 where she runs into frustrated, suicidal writer Drew, and then both the writers have a lot of slow-paced angst when editor/friend Isaac explains that Tucker will be killed, causing her stuff to permeate time and infuse lots of other time travelers.

 Think of nonlinear time as a pie. We can eat the pieces in any order, but you cant eat the same slice twice. And baby, Ive eaten a lot of pie. 

[Jan 2013]

The bottom-right corners of each book provided a little flip-animation of a morphing character.

The Animorphs Books
aka The Changelings
by K.A. Applegate
First time travel: Oct 1997

Five kids and their alien friend Ax can change into any animal that they touch, which is a good thing given that they’re the only ones standing between the Yeerks and the conquest of all mankind.

Tim liked the Animorphs even more than their earlier cousin, the Goosebumps books, and I agree. But I asked him recently why the books needed to introduce time travel. Weren’t there enough fantastical elements already? But he pointed out that without time travel, Jake, Marco, Cassie, Rachel, Tobias and Ax couldn’t turn into dinosaurs.

 The Forgotten (Oct 1997)Animorphs 11
The Andalite Chronicles (Dec 1997)a companion prequel
In the Time of the Dinosaurs (Jun 1998)Megamorphs 2
Elfangor’s Secret (Apr 1999)Megamorphs 3

 “We were blown through time, Jake,” Cassie said. “We arent where we want to be, and we arent when we want to be.” 

[Oct 1997]

“A Memory of the Nineteen-Nineties”
by Teller
First publication: The Atlantic Monthly, Nov 1997

Max Beerbohm, an author in the 1890s and early twentieth century, told a tale of Enoch Soames who made a deal with the devil to visit the Reading Room in the British Museum on 3 June 1997. Famed magician Teller recounts what happened at ten past two on the designated day, a day that Teller has been waiting and planning for for thirty-four and a half years.

 In other words, anyone in the Round Reading Room of the British Museum at ten past two on June 3, 1997, would be able to verify Beerbohms memoir, and see an authentic, guaranteed, proven ghost. 

[Apr 2014]

Sabrina and her aunts in the 60s: Far out!

Sabrina, the Teenage Witch
created by Nell Scovell
First time travel: 7 Nov 1997

The first time travel was part of a four-part crossover of time-travel episodes in Boy Meets World (’40s), You Wish (’50s), and Teen Angel (’70s).

 “Inna Gadda Sabrina (7 Nov 1997)”   to the 1960s
“Love in Bloom” (11 Feb 2000)Daniel Boone to the present
“Time after Time” (15 Mar 2002)to when Zelda was in love

 Peace, love and no bathing. 
—Sabrina’s description of the 60’s

[Note 1997]

Cory and Shawn in the 40s: Boogie Woogie Bugle Boys

Boy Meets World
created by Michael Jacobs and April Kelly
First time travel: 7 Nov 1997

The early episodes had charm, but the one spout of time travel (“No Guts, No Cory”, courtesy of Salem from Sabrina) to World War II was trite.

 Cory—were going down to elist. 

[Note 1997]

Sabrina as E.T. in the closing credits

You Wish
created by Michael Jacobs
First time travel: 7 Nov 1997

A genie is freed after two millennia to live with a single ’90s mom and her two teens. One of the 12 episodes (“Genie without a Cause” on 11/7/97) takes the family back to the ’50s as part of the Sabrina time-travel night; a later episode (“All in the Family Room” on 5/29/98) had one of the teens run away through time to a pirate ship.
[Nov 1997]

Adult Marcia heads back to the 70s, now in living color!

Teen Angel
created by Al Jean and Mike Reiss
First time travel: 7 Nov 1997

A teenager’s dead best friend comes back as an angel, but the best thing about the show was that I could continue my crush on Marcia Brady, at least for the first half of the short series which included time travel (courtesy of Sabrina’s Salem) to Marcia’s home time of the ’70s (in “One Dog Night” on 11/7/97). Sadly, the later bit of time travel was Marcialess (“Back to DePolo” on 1/30/98 in which everyone takes a turn at eating the death hamburger that killed teen angel in the first place).

 I miss the 70s. Back then, I wast sitting at home without a date on a Friday night. 

[Note 1997]

Men in Black: The Series
by Duane Capizzi, Jeff Kline and Richard Raynis
First time travel: 20 Dec 1997

I’ve yet to see a modern tv cartoon with animation up to my childhood fare, but the stories of this adaptation of the alien-fighters (based on the Malibu comic, which was based on the movie) are sometimes watchable, including some episodes where the Men time traveled even before Men in Black III.

 Never put off until tomorrow what you can do yesterday. 
—from “The Way Out West Syndrome”

[Dec 2013]

by Terry Pratchett
First time travel: 1998 in The Last Continent

Discworld humor either bites you or it doesn’t—not so much for me, but my friend Jim Martin talked me into reading The Last Continent (1998) for its send-up of “The Sound of Thunder” and the grandfather paradox. And I did laugh. I can’t guarantee that that book is the first time travel in Discworld, but it does precede the other time travel that I know of in Night Watch (2002).

 “Its not just that things in the future can affect things in the past,” he said. “Things that didnt happen but might have happened can . . . affect things that really happened. Even things that happened and shouldnt have happened and were removed still have, oh, call ’em shadows in time, things left over which interfere with whats going on.” 
—The Last Continent

[Jan 2015]

The Incredible Journey to the Beginning of Time
by Nicholas Harris
First publication: 1998
I thought it worthwhile to include this one example of a nicely illustrated non-fiction children’s book to show how ubiquitous time travel machines have become in our culture (Chinese authorities notwithstanding).

 This book is like a time machine. Starting from now, you are about to travel back through time. 

[Nov 2013]

adapted by Kurt Wimmer, Stephen Hauser, and Paul Attanasio (Barry Levinson, director)
First release: 13 Feb 1998

For me, this adaptation of Crichton’s novel was slow and unscarey.

 I borrowed from good writers, You know: Isaac Asimov, Rod Serling. 

[Sep 2015]

“I Am a Fine Musician . . .”
by Roberta Rogow
First publication: Don’t Open This Book!, Mar 1998
When Judy’s genius husband goes off to a conference, he leaves a machine on in his lab that keeps bringing musical geniuses from the past to the present.

 I could hear music all the way through the house. From the sounds drifting down, I could tell that Schubert was strumming the guitar, Haydn had formed his string quartet, Bach must have figured out how to turn on the Moog, and Handel had Vivaldi and Corelli working on a motet (or maybe the Italians were working with Handel). 

[Jul 2013]

Lost in Space
by Akiva Goldsman (Stephen Hopkins, director)
First release: 5 Apr 1998

The Robinsons hope to open up a new planet for colonization—and if they fail there is always Dr. Smith’s time machine to let them try again, unless perhaps Smith goes back even further and . . .

 Will Robinson, I will tell you a joke. Why did the robot cross the road? Because he was carbon bonded to the chicken. 

[Feb 2010]

“Cosmic Corkscrew”
by Michael A. Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jun 1998
A science fiction writer goes back to 1938 to make a copy of Asimov’s first story before it is lost.

 I looked at the copy of “Cosmic Corkscrew” I held in my hand, and I looked at the Chronobox. 

[May 1998]

Twice Upon a Yesterday
aka The Man with Rain in His Shoes, aka If Only
by Rafa Russo (Maria Ripoll, director)
First release: 30 Aug 1998

A year after he left his long-time girlfriend for a fling, actor Victor Bukowski hits rock bottom and desperately wants her back on the eve of her wedding to another. So, when two Spanish rubbishmen find him falling down drunk into a trash bin, they send him back in time for a second chance.

 And then I tried to go back to Sylvia, but it was too late. If only I could go back. 

[Oct 2015]

“Time Gypsy”
by Ellen Klages
First publication: Bending the Landscape: Original Gay and Lesbian Writing, Sep 1998
Thirty-year-old Dr. Carol McCullough, a physics post-doc at Berkeley, worships Sara Baxter Clarke, a rare woman physicist who died in 1956 before she could present her paper giving an argument for a practical tempokinetics.

 I'm offering to send you back in time to attend the 1956 International Conference for Experimental Physics. I need a copy of Clarkes last paper. 

[Apr 2014]

“The Truth about Weena”
by David J. Lake
First publication: Dreaming Down Under, Sep 1998

David Lake is a noted scholar on Wells and author of Darwin and Doom: H.G. Wells and the Time Machine wherein he notes that Wells knew of the paradoxes involved in time travel, but didnt want to address them in what he saw as a serious story about social trends. So, Lake says, his own Weena story is a shot at showing “what really happens in backward time travel,” which in this case is a model where backward time travel causes the universe to split. Lake handles the idea consistently, although for me, Lake’s afterward to the story fails to fully acknowledge the history of the split-universe idea, and the afterward does not give sufficient credit to single timeline alternatives.

On the other hand, I love stories that tell us what truly happened in another well-known story, and Lake handles that well, telling us in the voice of the original narrator about what truly happened to the Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) after he first returned to 1891 and subsequently set out to rescue Weena.

 Well, in its hitherto published form it was partly fiction, because at the time—1895—I could not write the full truth. The full truth was even more fantastic than the fiction—too fantastic, surely, to be believed; or if believed, too disturbing to received notions of Time. And besides, there were living people to protect: in particular, one young person who was very dear to us. 

[Jul 2015]

Flint,the Time Detective
by Hideki Sonoda and Akira Yamauchi (original manga)
First episode: 1 Oct 1998

Flint, a none-too-bright cave boy, is defossilized in the 25th century and applies his remarkable strength and bravery to protecting the world from the time-changing machinations of the Dark Lord. The 39 Japanese anime episodes were dubbed in English and broadcast in 2000.

 Crossing the time barrier to save the world! 

[Aug 2013]

Seven Days
created by Christopher Crowe and Zachary Crowe
First episode: 7 Oct 1998

Navy Lt. Frank Parker is the mentally unstable operative for government missions that can travel back in time exactly one week.

 Someday Im gonna form a chrononauts’ union. 

[Oct 1998]

A Knight in Camelot
adapted by Joe Wiesenfeld (Roger Young, director)
First release: 8 Nov 1998 (made-for-tv)

Not even Whoopi (as Vivien Morgan, Ph.D., the Connecticut Yankee) or Michael York (King Arthur) could save this adaptation, even though it did bring many of the basic ideas and characters of Twain’s original. But it fell down on poor dialogue, forced melodrama, and strained moralizing.

 This evilness of yours must be avenged, so Im gonna blot out the sun. 

[Jul 2015]

David Brin’s Out of Time Series
created by David Brin
First book: 1999
The 24th century needs heroes—teenaged heroes from our time.

 Yanked! (1999)Nancy Kress
Tiger in the Sky (1999)Sheila Finch
The Game of Worlds (1999)   Roger MacBride Allen

 But now you need to prepare yourself for a great shock. Youre not in New York, and youre not in 1999. This is the future. 

[May 2011]

by Michael Crichton
First publication: 1999

Three bland archaeology graduate students, one of whom envisions himself as a knight, are sent back to 14th-century France to rescue their professor. The novel mentions a multiverse model of time-travel, but gives no explication (nor does it enter the plotline); the most interesting characters and developments appear for a few pages and are never again heard of (at least not in this universe).

 I dont mean time travel at all. Time travel is impossible. Everyone knows that. 

[Apr 2011]

Stargate SG-1
created by Brad Wright and Jonathan Glassner
First time travel: 5 Mar 1999

Premise: Ancient visitors to Earth have left a gateway to the stars and to other Egyptian-like civilizations. I watched the movie and the first two seasons on Amazon, but never fully got pulled in to the gate, not even when they traveled back in time to 1969 and made a cool reference to “Tomorrow Is Yesterday.”

 1969 (5 Mar 1999)back to 1969
Window of Opportunity (4 Aug 2000)time Loop
2010 (3 Jan 2001)from alternate 2010 to 2001
2001 (31 Aug 2001)continuation of “2010” plot
It’s Good To Be King (4 Jan 2005)discover a time machine
Moebius, Part 1 (15 Feb 2005)back to origin of the gate
Moebius, Part 2 (22 Feb 2005)continuation

 Thornbird: Im Major Robert Thornbird. And you are?
O’Neill: Captain James T. Kirk of the Starship Enterprise. 

[Aug 2014]

The Devil’s Arithmetic
adapted by Robert J. Avrech (Donna Deitch, director)
First aired: 28 Mar 1999 (made-for-tv)

Hannah Stern, reluctant to listen to her elders’ talk of their Jewish heritage, finds herself thrown back to the time World War II Germany in this made-for-tv movie.

 You should know my parents are still alive, and I want to go back to New Rochelle. 

[May 2011]

“Remembrance of Things to Come”
by Lawrence Watt-Evans
First publication: Analog, Apr 1999
As a first experiment in a new technology, the memories of English Professor Richard Williams are sent back in time into the mind of writer Dorrie Ledbetter right before her untimely death to see if those memories can cause her to leave a clue about the meaning of an ambiguous story.

 We think we have a way to record the quantum state of a present-day brain onto a brain somewhere in the past in such a way that the patterns in the receiving brain will duplicate those in the source brain, and that as a result the receiving brain will acquire the memories of the source brain. 

[May 1999]

Family Guy
created by Seth MacFarlane
First time travel: 25 Apr 1999

Nikolaus Correll turned me on to time travel in Family Guy.

 Mind over Murder (25 Apr 99)Stewie tries to avoid teething
Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story (2005 dvd)   Stewie meets adult self
Meet the Quagmires (20 May 07)Peter goes back to age 18
Road to Germany (19 Oct 08)back to Nazi Germany
The Big Bang Theory (8 May 11)Bertram tries to kill da Vinci
Back to the Pilot (31 Nov 2011)back to Family Guy’s 1st episode
Viewer Mail #2; Internal Affairs (20 May 2012)   to save Kurt Cobain
Yug Ylimaf (11 Nov 2012)Stewie might not be born!
Valentine’s Day (10 Feb 2013)Stewie gets a date in the 60s
Christmas Guy (15 Dec 2013)saving Brian
Excellent Adventure (4 Jan 2015)history homework help

 It’s called a temporal causality loop. The universe created me, so that I could create it, so it could create me, and so on. 
—Stewie in “The Big Bang Theory”

[Oct 2011]

The Smedley Faversham Stories
by F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre
First story: Analog Science Fiction, Jun 1999
If a particular conclusion is a good one, what makes you think that only one person will think of it? That’s why Smedley Faversham, in his first time-travel escapade, ran into more than one other time traveler. In all, the punster has had five adventures, each sillier than the last.

Time Lines (Jun 1999)Analog
A Real Bang-Up Job (Jul 2000)Analog
“Put Back That Universe!” (Oct 2000)Analog
Schrödinger’s Cat-Sitter (Jul/Aug 2001)Analog
A Deadly Medley of Smedley (Apr 2003)   Analog
Annual Annular Annals (Jan/Feb 2004)Analog

 When Smedley Faversham traveled back in time to Munich in 1919, the first thing he saw was a large sign reading “THIS WAY TO KILL HITLER.” 

[May 1999]

Austin Powers in The Spy Who Shagged Me
by Mike Myers and Michael McCullers (Jay Roach, director)
First released: 11 Jul 1999

After Dr. Evil escapes from his cryogenic orbit around Earth, he invents a time machine to return to 1969 and attack Austin Powers while he sleeps.

 Using this <airquotes>time machine</airquotes>, I shall go back to the 1960s and steal Austin Powers mojo. 

[Apr 2014]

“Tempora Mutantur”
by H.G. Stratmann
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 1999
While dining at his favorite quiet rib joint, a private man is interrupted by billionaire businessman Rem Caesar who is being chased by time travelers.

 If someone built a time machine, theyd be famous for all time. A magnet for every time traveling historian, media-type, tourist—or just “fans” with no lives of their own, coming back to bask in their idols luminous prescence. 

[Jun 1999]

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
by J.K. Rowling
First publication: 08 Jul 1999

In the third Harry Potter book, (among other things) Harry’s friend Hermione uses a time-turner amulet to travel short distances in time so she can attend more classes, and the device also proves useful when Harry and friends must rescue Sirius and Buckbeak.

 Mysterious thing, time. Powerful . . . and when meddled with, dangerous. 
—Professor Dumbledore

[Dec 1999]

“Rappaccini’s Other Daughter”
by Anthony Boucher
First publication: The Compleat Boucher, 1 Aug 1999
You know of Nathanial Hawthorne’s tale of “Rappaccini’s Daughter,” but do you know of the second, equally beautiful, daughter who had a significant effect on all time travelers?

 And that is why our time machines are not permitted to travel back farther than the middle of the twentieth century. 

[Jan 2013]

“. . . And Three to Go”
by Ken Cowley
First publication: Miscellany Macabre, Sep 1999
A recently retired historical researcher visits a 900-year-old inn and cannot stop himself from researching its past.

 The area was too gloomy for close examination, but surely there should be rope marks. 

[Dec 2013]

Walker, Texas Ranger
created by Albert S. Ruddy, et. al.
First time travel: 16 Oct 1999

Somebody has to say it: Chuck Norris doesn’t travel to the 19th century after a 1999 encounter with a Shaman (“Way of the Warrior”); the 19th century travels to Chuck Norris.

 The shaman sent for me. He brought me here to help you. 

[Dec 2010]

The Justin Counting Stories
by Harry Turtledove
First story: Asimov’s and Analog, Dec 1999

At twenty-one, Justin Kloster has it made: one more year of college and then happily ever after with his sweetheart Megan. Then his forty-year-old self shows up to prevent Justin from making terrible mistakes that will lead to an eventual nasty divorce with Megan.

Turtledove tells the story twice: Once from the POV of Justin-21 (“Twenty-One, Counting Up”) and once from the POV of Justin-40 (“Forty, Counting Down”). I loved this technique when Orson Scott Card used in Ender’s Shadow, but for me, it fell flat with Justin, perhaps because the stories didn’t add much to each other.

 I was stupid. I didnt know enough. I didnt know how to take care of her. 

[Aug 2012]

Blackadder: Back and Forth
by Richard Curtis, Ben Elton and Rowan Atkinson (Paul Weiland, director)
First release: 6 Dec 1999

Rowan Atkinson’s historically funny Blackadder character comes to the big screen for a final 30-minute episode. Each of the earlier tv series followed one of Lord Edmund Blackadders many ancestors in a famous time period, but now the modern-day Blackadder announces to his dinner party that he’s just built a time machine based on DaVinci’s specification, after which he wagers each of guests £10,000 that he can use the machine to retrieve any named object from history. Of course, Blackadder himself thinks it’s all going to be nothing more than the best New Year’s Eve prank ever, but the dinosaurs, Queen Elizabeth I, Will Shakespeare, Robin Hood, Maid Marion, Napoleon, Wellington, Hadrian, and others have different ideas.

Now, if only we could get Mr. Bean in a time machine.

 Elizabeth: How on Earth can one look at the past? You cant see something thats already happened.
The Bishop: Unless youre on the lavatory.
The Viscount: Uh! Good point, Bish!
Blackadder: Yes, or . . . or unless ones got a time machine. 

[Oct 2015]

Galaxy Quest
by David Howard and Robert Gordon (Dean Parisot, director)
First release: 25 Dec 1999

Some tv shows (we won’t mention any names) live on for their fans decades after cancelation. The result might be that aliens think the heroes of these shows are real, in which case the aforementioned heroes could be kidnapped to rescue the aforementioned aliens (and to figure out whether the Omega 13 will destroy the universe in 13 seconds or reverse time for that aforementioned amount of seconds).

Tim and I watched this at Lake Cushman during a trip to the northwest in 2003, and I was as surprised as anyone about how much we laughed at Tim Allen’s parady.

 Larado: Your orders, sir? [pause] Sir, your orders?
Commander Taggart: Activate the Omega 13. [To be continued . . .] 

[Mar 2003]

“Time Out of Joint”
by Pauline Ashwell
First publication: Analog, Jan 2000
A time traveler who makes a living as an antiquities dealer tells a tale of a Greek urn that appeared in two different places at the same time.

 If the Time Traveller sold his wares directly from the maker, modern tests would show that they are only a few years old. They are stored in an underground cavern somewhere in the Pliocene to rack up the appropriate number of centuries, so that tests for thermoluminescence and cosmic ray tracks give the right answer. 

[Dec 1999]

This story appeared in Analog’s Probability Zero series of flash fiction.
“Whose Millennium?”
by Michael A. Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jan 2000
A time-traveling Jew shows up in a police station on the final date of the Hebrew calendar.

 Its September 29, 2239. 

[Dec 1999]

Archie Cartoons
originally directed by Hal Sutherland
First time travel: 14 Feb 2000

There were Archie cartoons when I was a kid: The first ones I remember had the Riverdale teens as a pop band (“Sugar, Sugar!”) around the same time as the Monkees, but I don’t recall any time travel then, even if it was directed by Hal Sutherland, soon-to-be director of the animated Star Trek. However, I did spot a later three-part time travel story in Archie’s Weird Mysteries that ran in 2000 (“Archie’s Date with Fate,” “Alternate Riverdales,” and “Teen Out of Time”).

 Free will and predestination aside, I vow to completely redesign my time travel invention to make it safer. 
—Dilton in “Archie’s Date with Fate”

[Jul 2013]

2000x: Tales of the Next Millennia
produced by Yuri Rasovsky
First time travel: 4 Apr 2000

Yuri Rasovsky brought radio plays back to the future, or at least to the 21st century. The first play, broadcast on 4 Apr 2000, was based on Heinlein’s time travel story, “By His Bootstraps,” with the role of Bob Wilson distinctively voiced by Richard Dreyfuss. I'm not certain, but host Harlan Ellison might be the voice of the narrator in that episode.

At least two later time-travel stories were also produced.

 By His Bootstraps (4 Apr 2000)by Robert A. Heinlein
A Sleep and a Forgetting (30 May 2000)by Robert Silverberg
The Hunting Season (27 Jun 2000)by Frank M. Robinson

 2000X is produced by the Hollywood Theater of the Ear in association with National Public Radio. 

[Jul 2015]

by Toby Emmerich (Gregory Hoblit, director)
First release: 28 Apr 2000

In 1999, John Sullivan, living in his boyhood home, finds an old ham radio that his dad had built, he naturally wants to see whether it still works. As it turns out, not only does it work, but it puts him in communication with 1969 where he talks to his dad, Frank, on the very day before Frank’s death in a fire. Frank now avoids the fire, which gives his 1999 son the memories of both a fatherless life and a life where Frank survived but John’s mother did not.

 I want you to hide that wallet: someplace where nobody’s gonna find it for thirty years. 

[Oct 2001]

“How I Won the Lottery, Broke the Time Barrier (or is that Broke the Time Barrier, Won the Lottery), and Still Wound Up Broke”
by Ian Randal Strock
First publication: Analog, Jun 2000
A lowly lab assistant receives a message from his future self with the winning lottery numbers.

 Tomorrows Lotto drawing is for forty-five million dollars. The winning numbers will be 17, 19, 30, 32, 42, and 51. 

[May 2000]

“Built upon the Sands of Time”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2000
Physics professor Owen fitzHugh tells a story in a pub about how a small quantum fluctuation in the past can cause big consequences down the line—and how he may have sent a chronon into the past to do just that.

 Im not sure. A device to excite time quanta, I think. Into the past, of course. 

[Jun 2000]

“The Invention of Time Travel”
by Jim Loy
First publication:, 1 Jul 2000

After reading Professor Hanson’s acceptance speech to the Swedish Academy, another man tells the real story of the professor’s invention.

 Wanted: Time traveller to please give me a ride in a time machine. Please meet me at 342 E. Snow Way, New York, NY, at noon, July 1, 2000. 

[Jun 2012]

The Kid
by Audrey Wells (Jon Turteltaub, director)
First release: 7 Jul 2000

I never quite figured out how Russ Duritz meets his own eight-year-old self, Rusty, but the young kid certainly manages to straighten out the older kid.

 So, Im forty, Im not married, I dont fly jets, and I dont have a dog? I grow up to be a loser. 

[Feb 2013]

“Quid pro Quo”
by Ray Bradbury
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct 2000
An author, frustrated by the wasted talent of Simon Cross, builds a time machine to bring the wasted Cross back to meet the promising young Cross.

 You do not build a time machine unless you know where you are going. 

[Mar 2003]

“Crow’s Feat”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Nov 2000
Mid-list science fiction writer Paul Gallatin runs into scientist Ivan Ivanovich at a party, and the scientist offers to send Paul back to Shakespeare’s time.

 Tell me, how many copies do you think a book would sell if it proved your belief that Shakespeare was a fraud? 

[Sep 2012]

“Is There Anybody There?”
by Kim Newman
First publication: The New English Library Book of Internet Stories, Nov 2000
More horror than anything else, but amusing nevertheless as an internet stalker in 2001 communicates via a ouija board with a psychic in 1923.

 Always, he would leave memories to cherish; months later, he would check up on his net-pals—his score so far was five institutionalisations and two suicides—just to see that the experience was still vivid. He was determined to crawl into IRENE Ds skull and stay there, replicating like a virus, wiping her hard drive. 

[Apr 2014]

“The Pottawatomie Giant”
by Andy Duncan
First publication: Sci Fiction, 1 Nov 2000

In the early 1900s, boxer Jess Willard wins the world championship but then snubs Houdini; after he dies, he gets a second chance.

 He opened them to find himself in a far more uncomfortable chair, in a balcony at the Los Angeles Orpheum, in the middle of Harry Houdinis opening-night performance, November 30, 1915. 

[Dec 2013]

movie poster for Timetravel_0
The John Titor Urban Myth
by Anonymous
First internet post: 2 Nov 2000
I suppose no time-travel list of the third millennium is complete without the urban myth of time-traveler John Titor who began posting messages on the internet in November of 2000, claiming to have come from the year 2036 with dire warnings. Apart from numerous amusing internet pages on the traveler, there are also a handful of published items.

 John Titor: A Time Traveler’s Tale (Dec 2003)Book
Time Traveler Zero Zero (2004)Play
Timetravel_0 (Aug 2009)Docudrama
Steins;Gate (Oct 2009)Video game, manga, etc.

 I was just about to give up hope on anyone knowing who Tipler or Kerr was on this worldline. The basics for time travel start at CERN in about a year and end in 2034 with the first “time machine” built by GE. 
—Titor’s first internet post

[Sep 2015]

South Park
created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone
First time travel: 8 Nov 2000

The first indication of time travel in South Park was in 4th grade when (among other things) Cartman’s Dawsons Creek Trapper Keeper Futura S2000 has designs on killing Kenny and taking over the world, but fortunately a robot from the future has come back to protect and serve.

 4th Grade (8 Nov 2000)attempt to return to 3rd grade
Trapper Keeper (15 Nov 2000)   T2 spoof
My Future Self ’n’ Me (4 Dec 2002)Stan’s future self
Goobacks (28 Apr 2004)emigrants from the future
Go God Go XII (8 Nov 2006)Cartman to future religious war

 I have come to destroy that trapper keeper because it was the Dawsons Creek Trapper Keeper that belongs to an Eric Cartman in South Park which three years from now manifests itself into an omnipotent super being and destroys all of hu-manity. 

[Nov 2000]

Dude, Where’s My Car?
by Philip Stark (Danny Leiner, director)
First release: 15 Dec 2000

After a day of whacky adventures, Dude and Sweet find the cosmic continuum transfunctioner, save the world, make up with the twins, and are transported back to a time before the hijinks ensued.

 Wait a second, lets recap. Last night, we lost my car, we accepted stolen money from a transsexual stripper, and now some space nerds want us to find something we cant pronounce. I hate to say it, Chester, but maybe we need to cut back on the shibbying. 

[Jul 2011]

Courage, the Cowardly Dog
created by John R. Dilworth
First time travel: 29 Dec 2000

In one episode (“1000 Years in the Future”) of the misadventures of Courage and his family, an errant meteor knocks them into the future, it’s up to Courage to explore things in the new Banana Republic and get them back to their own time (or maybe chance will have to do that).

 I have a feeling were not in Kansas any more, or the present time, or some combination of the two. 

[Aug 2013]

Power Rangers Time Force
by Judd Lynn and Jackie Marchland
First episode: 3 Feb 2001

In the ninth season of the power rangers, evil mutant Ransik flees from the 30th century back to our time. Rangers pursue. I don’t know whether other years had time travel.

 If I cant rule the present, then Ill just rule the paaaaaast! 

[Dec 2012]

The two stories were expanded into this 2009 novel.
The Titus Oates Stories
by Brenda W. Clough
First story: Analog, Apr 2001
Titus Oates, a member of Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole, is taken from the time stream and revived in a bewildering 21st century, whereupon he does what any self-respecting explorer would do—heads to the stars!

The two Oates stories (“May Be Some Time” in the April 2001 Analog and “Tiptoe on a Fence Post” in the Jul/Aug 2002 Analog) were combined and expanded for the 2009 novel, Revise the World.

 Not only are you a person rescued from a tragic death, but your removal is supremely unlikely to trigger any change in the time-stream, since your body was lost: presumed frozen solid, entombed in a glacier for eons . . . 

[Nov 2001]

“What Weena Knew”
by James Van Pelt
First publication: Analog, Apr 2001

James Van Pelt kindly had coffee with me and signed a baseball for me at a Denver science fiction convention—oh, and he wrote (among other things) this fine story of Weena from the moment that H.G. Wells’s time traveller rescued her from the river.

I met the prolific and kind James Van Pelt at a convention in Denver, where we talked about one of his students who later came to Boulder to study computer science. I had misinterpreted a biography of Van Pelt in Analog as if it were an obituary, so I was happy to see the outstanding writer alive and willing to sign a baseball that I presented to him.

 Then a vice clamped her upper arm. A surge. A tremendous force, and she was clear of the stream. Air! There was air to breathe, but all she could do was cough. She was being carried. Her cheek rested on skin. Hough arms wrapped her close until they were on the bank. Gently, her rescuer put her down. Rock warmed her back; her hands lay flat in the heat, her head dropped onto the warmth. Against the sky stood a figure stragely shaped. Weenas vision swirled—she could barely focus—but before she passed out, she saw in wonder, he was a giant. 

[Nov 2001]

Just Visiting
by Jean-Marie Poiré, Christian Clavier and John Hughes (Poiré, director)
First release: 6 Apr 2001

I just wasn’t in the mood for a comedy when I tried to watch this movie where witchcraft transports a 13th-century knight and his servant to the year 2000.

 You could tell from the petulant arch on his furrowed brow that he was not in route to a good deed. 

[Aug 2011]

The Poultry Paradox
by Carlos Pedroza (Pedroza, director)
First released: 15 Apr 2001

So which did come first?

 Broadcasting live from the beginning of time, despite everything; well prove that the chicken came before the egg. 

[Jul 2013]

T2 Novels
by S.M. Stirling
First book: May 2001

There are interminable Terminator spin-offs, and this series is the first. I enjoyed the first book, T2: Infiltrator, set after the second movie with Sarah and 16-year-old son on the run in Paraguay.

 T2: Infiltrator (2001) 
T2: Rising Storm (2003) 
T2: The Future War (2004) 

 Come with me if you want to live. 
—John Connor to Kyle Reese in T2: The Future War

[Jul 2010]

created by Matt Groening
First time travel: 6 May 2001

Philip J. Fry never caught my interest the way the Simpsons did, but after suviving a millennium in cryogenic suspension, Philip and his 31st century cohorts do have some wacky time travel, including “The Late Philip J. Fry” wherein the professor’s one-way time machine takes them further and further into futures with a strange resemblance to various sf movie futures.

 Time Keeps on Slippin’ (6 May 2001)Chronitons skip time forward
Roswell That Ends Well (9 Dec 2001)back to Area 51 in 1947
The Why of Fry (6 Apr 2003)back to time he was frozen
The Late Philip J. Fry (7/29/10)time machine that only goes forward
All the Presidents’ Heads (28 Jul 2011)   American revolution

 We are travelers from the past, my good one. Since your time, human evolution has diverged. There are we—advanced in intellect and morality—and the dumblocks—stupid, vicious brutes who live underground. 
—from “The Late Philip J. Fry”

[Jul 2013]

“A Matter of Time”
by Robert Reginald
First publication: Katydid & Other Critters, Jun 2001
When Jake Smith’s neighbor—Stratton Bundford Audray, Ph.D.—invents a time machine, Jake volunteers to be the first human traveler in order to solve a vexing problem about his own ancestry.

 Ive been tracing my family tree, and ve reached this dead end, because Smith is such a common name, and Id really like to volunteer to make the first manned expedition into the past. 

[Sep 2015]

The story also appeared in this 2010 collection.
“Saving Jane Austen”
by Robert Reginald
First publication: Katydid & Other Critters, Jun 2001
Time travelers Jake Lawson, Patricia Wardon, and their small entourage travel to 1801 England to observe young Jane Austen, who to Jake seems incredibly unimpressive while Patty observes that she is full of sentimental claptrap. Things, however, are not always what they seem.

 This is the fourth timestep Ive made, and I can never quite get used to arriving downtime with nary a stitch in place. I know the engineers have explained the scientific reasons why this must be so, something about biostatic energy not being transferable to inert objects, but if thats the case, why dont we also lose our teeth, our nails, and hair at the same time? 

[Sep 2015]

Time Squad
created by Dave Wasson
First episode: 8 Jun 2001

In a utopian future, the past starts to unravel and it’s up to Otto, a ten-year-old 21st century orphan, and the rest of the Time Squad to patch things back together.

 Thats the History Instability Alarm! Its time for another mission! 

[Jul 2013]

by Edward M. Lerner
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2001
Professor Thaddeus Fitch gives a practical demonstration of the grandfather paradox to his physics classes.

 Imagine that I had the technology with which to visit my grandfather in his youth. Once there, what is to stop me from killing him before hed had the opportunity to reproduce? But if I did succeed, who was it who had travelled backward . . . 

[Dec 2001]

劇場版ポケットモンスター セレビィ 時を越えた遭遇(であい
English title: Pokémon 4Ever: Celebi—Voice of the Forest (translated from Japanese)
by Hideki Sonoda (Kunihiko Yuyama, director)
First release: 7 Jul 2001

A tiny Pokéemon Celebi and his boy are chased into the future by a Pokémon hunter.

 They say theres a sound you can hear when the spirit that protects the forest is time traveling. 

[Feb 2014]

Burton’s Planet of the Apes
by Pierre Boulle, William Broyles Jr., Lawrence Konner, et. al. (Tim Burton, director)
First release: 27 Jul 2001

I found two redeeming features in this melodramatic complete remake: Helena Bonham Carter and a time-travel twist at the end that was beyond my understanding.

 In this temple as in the hearts of the apes for whom he saved the planet the memory of General Thade is enshrined forever  

[Dec 2011]

Publicity poster for Writers of the Future
“T.E.A. and Koumiss”
by Steven C. Raine
First publication: Writers of the Future Volume 17, Aug 2001
Time-travel agent Germaine returns to the time of Ghengis Khan along with telepath bimbo Elena, intent on stopping Vlad from installing a millenia-long Russian utopia.

 Vladimir zipped back in time to change the past. With his background, our psych reckons with 90 percent probability that his goal will be to make medieval Russia supreme through guiding the Great Prince here. 

[Feb 2002]

“Time Out of Mind”
by Everett S. Jacobs
First publication: Writers of the Future Volume 17, Aug 2001
Thomas Randall, young and single, lives in a world that is besotted by bubbles that shift acres from one time to another.

 The rotting carcass of an apatosaurus blocked the intersection of Highway 9 and Needham Road. 

[Feb 2002]

Samurai Jack
created by Genndy Tartakovsky
First episode: 10 Aug 2001

When the evil Aku returns to threaten the empire, a young prince trains for years to eventually fight and defeat him, but before Aku can be fully vanquished, he sends the prince into the future where he battles through threat after threat (with stories told in pictures more than words) in his quest to return to his own time.

 I thought once like you, but the sword is only a tool. What power has it compared to that of the hand that wields it? 

[Jul 2013]

Invader Zim
created by Jhonen Vasquez
First time travel: 24 Aug 2001

Tim showed me the one Zim time-travel episode (“Big, Bad Rubber Piggy”) on Christmas Day in 2010. The would-be alien invader Zim plans to send a terminator robot back to kill is nemesis Dib, but the time-travel portal will accept only rubber piggies, which Zim manages to make do with.

 You could prevent Walton Chunky from ever inventing Breakfast Chunks by using temporal object replacement technology! 
—“Big, Bad Rubbery Piggy”

[Dec 2010]

Happy Accidents
by Brad Anderson (Anderson, director)
First release: 12 Sep 2001

Ruby Weaver tells her therapist that her latest beau, Sam Deed, is sweet, kind and quirky—and the fantasy that he’s come back from the year 2470 because of that photo he saw of her (and possibly to make an important change) is nothing more than a game that they play.

 Break the causal chain. 

[Dec 2012]

Star Trek: Enterprise
created by Rick Berman and Brannon Braga
First episode: 26 Sep 2001

You must watch the whole of Enterprise to grok the full arc of the Temporal Cold War with 13 episodes that were more temporal than others:

 Cold Front (28 Nov 2001)Crewman Daniels from 31st century
Shockwave I/II (22 May / 18 Sep 2002)forward to 31st century
Future Tense (19 Feb 2003)little time loops and cold war
Twilight (5 Nov 2003)future T’Pol tries to correct past
Carpenter Street (26 Nov 2003)Detroit in 2004
Azati Prime (3 Mar 2004)more of Daniels and Cold War
E² (5 May 2004)meet your own descendants
Zero Hour (26 May 2004)World War II
Storm Front I/II (8/15 Oct 2004)World War II
In a Mirror, Darkly I/II (22/29 Apr 2005)   23rd-century Defiant

 Old T’Pol: Theres a human expression: Follow your heart.
Young T’Pol: What if my heart doesnt know what it wants?
Old T’Pol: It will, in time, it will.

[Sep 2001]

“Other People”
by Neil Gaiman
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2001

The demon of this story carries out an exquisite torture of his victim. At the end, we do discover the victim’s fate, though I wondered what became of the demon. Time travel? I haven’t heard Gaiman talk of this story, but I like to think of it in that way because of the opening and closing quotes.

 “Time is fluid here,” he told the new arrival. 

[Jan 2014]

“Oven, Witch and Wardrobe”
by Tom Sweeney
First publication: Analog, Oct 2001
Siobhan hopes to advance in the time-travelers' hierarchy by successfully transferring plague-doomed children from 1410 Europe to Colonial America.

 It had seemed such an easy thing to do. Beguile hungry children with food, ship their dirty young butts off to colonial America and return to the twenty-third century to become the first researcher ever to use time travel for humanitarian purposes. 

[Sep 2012]

Halloweentown II: Kalabar’s Revenge
by Jon Cooksey, Ali Marie Matheson and Paul Burnbaum (Mary Lambert, director)
First release: 12 Oct 2001 (made-for-tv)

Teenage witch Marnie Piper has a mom who doesn’t want her to carry on in the witch tradition, a grandma (Debbie Reynolds) who wants to take her on as an apprentice, and Kal—a cute guy hanging around who turns out to be the son of the family nemesis. When Marnie gets trapped by Kal in the other-dimension Halloweentown, Marnie and her troll friend Luke use time travel to escape; later they use a black-holeish “timeline” to get back to the present and save the day.

 You know that looks just like a Stephen Hawking description of a non-stellar black hole. 

[Oct 2015]

Buffy the Vampire Slayer
created by Joss Whedon
First time travel: 23 Oct 2001

Time travel was not a staple for the young bloodsucker nemesis, but Buffy did slay time on a few occassions.

 Life Serial (23 Oct 2001)   in a time loop fighting a mummy hand
Get It Done (18 Feb 2003)   back to meet original slayer makers

 Via, concursus, tempus, spatium, audi me ut imperio. Screw it! Mighty forces, I suck at Latin, okay? But thats not the issue. Im the one in charge, and Im telling you open that portal, now! 
—Willow in “Get It Done”

[Oct 2001]

Die Abrafaxe—Unter schwarzer Flagge
English title: The Pirates of Tortuga: Under the Black Flag (translated from German)
aka The Abrafaxe: Under the Black Flag
by Everett, Grützke, Platt, and Rietschel (Hahn and Power, directors)
First release: 25 Oct 2001

Abrax (English: Alex), Brabax (Max) and Califax—the young characters from the long-running German comic book, Mosaik—came to the animated screen in this time-travel adventure where they meet the 18th century pirates Anne Bonnie (good and beautiful) and Blackbeard (bad and bearded).

 The futures a cruel mistress. She never declares her hand until its too late. 

[Sep 2015]

The anthology had 12 original time travel stories, including “A Touch Through Time.” Let’s see whether I can manage 12 interesting images to illustrate the stories.
“A Touch Through Time”
by Kathleen M. Massie-Ferch
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
Dr. Connor Robins uses his time machine to grab extinct animals who are about to die anyway (since things break down if he tries to alter the past), and he also a young actress who died in a 1920s fire.

Kathleen M. Massie-Ferch, an avid geologist and writer, died of breast cancer shortly after this story was published.

 You could steal all the cells you wanted to use in cloning, or some sperm and ova. Anything, provided that the interaction changed nothing about their time-stream. We could even pull some of the bodies forward. 

[Apr 2012]

The story also appeared online for the
Free Fiction Monday
of 5 Aug 2013.

“Blood Trail”
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
Detective Wheldon, the top man in NYPD Homicide is approached by two FBI agents who offer to let him go back in time two weeks to observe the 4th killing by a serial killer.

This is the first story in Future Imperfect, a 2001 anthology of 12 original time-travel stories, co-edited by the prolific anthology Martin H. Greenberg (1941-2011) who was also a political science professor at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay.

 When it became clear that time travel was even a remote possibility, the government bought a lot of scientists. Those who didnt play got discredited. 

[Mar 2012]

The story also appeared in this 2005 collection.
by James P. Hogan
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
Professor Alymer Arbuthnot Abercrombie is on the verge of completing eight years of work to build a time machine when all of his vital notes are stolen.

 How can he tell you what youll do, like some kind of robot executing a program? Youre a human being with free will, for heavens sake. What happens if you plumb decide youre not going to do it? 

[Apr 2012]

The story also appeared in this 2005 collection.
“Doing Time”
by Robin Wayne Bailey
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
Samuel Enderby, Director and Chief Researcher of the Enderby Institute for Temporal Studies (and the inventor of the time machine) accidently finds himself stranded in 10,000,000 AD where the only other occupants are criminals who have been launched uptime using his technology.

 A marvelous tool for research has been abused and twisted to a vicious purpose. 

[Mar 2012]

“In the Company of Heroes”
by Diane Duane
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
A Swiss clockmaker offers billionaire Rob Willingden the chance to go back to his boyhood to stop the theft of his prized collection of Captain Thunder comics.

In 1987, Marvel’s own Roy Thomas was one of the founders of Hero Comics which sported a title called Captain Thunder and Blue Bolt, but the 1960s timing for the comic book of this story makes it more likely to be modeled after The Mighty Thor who premiered in Journey Into Mystery 83 (Aug 1962).

 This is a repair I think you must make. It is irresponsible to leave something broken when it can be fixed— 

[Mar 2012]

Tipler's Physics of Immortality
by William H. Keith, Jr.
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
An accident near a black hole has seemingly doomed Kevyn Shalamarn along with her copilot and her AI, until they are pulled into a future that could be taken from Frank Tipler’s The Physics of Immortality.

 The goal of this device is nothing less than complete knowledge, knowledge of everything that ever has been, that ever will be, that ever could be. 

[Apr 2012]

The Anasazi Man in a Maze design
“Jeff’s Best Joke”
by Jane Lindskold
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
When a crazy old man calling himself Coyote shows up at an archaeological dig in New Mexico claiming that the Anasazi disappeared into time, Jeff knows that the only way to convince the world of Coyote’s truth is to play a colossal joke on his co-director Jimmy.

 Time even passes differently at the top of a high building than at its base. 

[Mar 2012]

“Mint Condition”
by Nina Kiriki Hoffman
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
Sissy is an experienced agent for CollectorCorps, but she always gets stuck with a male chauvinist rookie for her partner in trips to retrieve highly collectable items from the past.

As you can tell from the comic book image, I’d say that the comic book Sissy was after in this trip was based on Giant-Size X-Men 1.

 Autographed copies of Minus Men 121? Practically nonexistent in 2059, at least until we got home with some. 

[Mar 2012]

The story also appeared in this 2003 collection.
“Palimpsest Day”
by Gary A. Braunbeck
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
In his forties, Danny’s parents are long gone as is the hope he had of marrying the girl he longed for in high school; instead, he runs a used bookstore in his childhood hometown, takes care of his Downs Syndrome sister, and has a surprising chance to change everything in the past.

 Live your life as if you were already living for the second time and as if you had acted the first time as wrongly as you are about to act now. 
—Danny’s mother (possibly quoting Victor E. Frankl’s Mans Search for Meaning).

[Apr 2012]

“Theory of Relativity”
by Jody Lynn Nye
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
Dr. Rachel Fenstone takes her time machine from her universe to a parallel universe (both of which contain the Marx Brothers) where she meets an analog of herself so that together they can figure out where their histories diverged and visit that moment in their mutual pasts.

 In June’s reality her grandfather was an inventor, too, but his parents settled in New York, where the boys grew up in the tenements not far from where the Marx Brothers were born. 

[Apr 2012]

The story also appeared in Stephen Jones’s 2010 anthology, Visitants.
“Things I Didn’t Know My Father Knew”
by Peter Crowther
First publication: Past Imperfect, Nov 2001
After his wife leaves for the day, writer Bennett Differing’s house is engulfed in a thick white fog, out of which comes his father who died 27 years before.

The second publication in Visitants (2010) is more in-line with the story than a time-travel anthology.

 Maybe the dead did use mist as a means of getting around—so many movies had already figured that one out . . . and maybe they did travel in time. 

[Mar 2012]

“What Time Is It?”
by Rita Lamb
First publication: The Young Oxford Book of Timewarp Stories, Nov 2001
A 15-year-old boy sits with his elderly grandmother who had trouble remembering what time she is in, and at least once, the trouble slips over to the boy, too.

 And drowsily I put my hand down to where I felt the warm, heavy head shifting restlessly on my kneww, and I stoked the silky crown, and I looked into the puzzled brown eyes of a young dog. 

[Jan 2014]

David Wyatt’s interior art for the story from Timewarp Stories
by Steve Bowkett
First publication: The Young Oxford Book of Timewarp Stories, Nov 2001
Danny and his partner in soldiering are at ground zero when a storm of refugees from a devastated future begins to arrive.

 Nobody really knew much about that devastation—The Catastrophe, as it had been called. It had happened—would happen, from Dannys perspective—almost a million years in the future, or so the Time Techs believed. 

[Jan 2014]

Black Knight
by Darryl Quarles, Peter Gaulke and Gerry Swallow (Gil Junger, director)
First release: 21 Nov 2001

When janitor Jamal Walker falls into the moat at Medieval World, he wakes up and carries out a weak impersonation of a Connecticut Yankee.

 Your Majesty, starting at small forward from Englewood High, two-time all-county conference player of the year, the messenger from Normandie—Jamal “Skyyyyyy” Walker! 

[Jun 2012]

The Bonaventure-Carmody Series
by Chris Roberson
First book: Dec 2001

After boarding-school student Roxanne Bonaventure stumbles across a bloody old woman who gives her a bracelet, she begins to find herself in different times and alternate universes with different Beatles’ songs and alternate Beatles.

This first novel, Any Time at All: The Lives and Time of Roxanne Bonaventure, was expanded into Here, There & Everywhere and followed by three more books.

 Set the Seas on Fire (Dec 2001)
Any Time at All (Sep 2002)
Here, There & Everywhere  (Apr 2005)expands Any Time at All
Paragaea: A Planetary Romance (May 2006)
Set the Seas on Fire  (Aug 2007)Expansion
End of the Century (Feb 2009)

 Roxanne smiled awkwardly, and looked over Juliens shoulder at the open stall. It looked unremarkable now, drab green-painted metal walls and a white porcelain toilet. Hardly the thing youd expect from some sort of door in time. At least proper English children in books got to travel through wardrobes and garden holes, not through unhygenic high school bathrooms. 

[Aug 2012]

Another Day
by Helen Frost and Don MacLeod (Jeffrey Reiner, director)
First release: 4 Dec 2001

After pregnant Kates boyfriend dies in a factory fire, she decides to forgo medical school and raise the baby along with her best friend David until four years later when a tramatic incident, some melodramtic music and godawful narration throw her back to before the fire.

 Thats impossible. Its one of a kind, and I made it with Meghan in crafts class last week. 

[Aug 2013]

“Time Sharing”
by Leland Neville
First publication: Fantastic, Winter 2001
Detective Lindsey Fillmore arrives at Taylor Houston’s house to investigate a dead body and possibly connect it to Houston’s video-making time-traveling escapades.
[Dec 2001]

Kate and Leopold
by Steven Rogers and James Mangold (Mangold, director)
First release: 25 Dec 2001

Leopold, a 19th century blueblood, awakens in 21st century New York where he meets and confounds adwoman Kate.

 Time, it has been proposed, is the fourth dimension. And yet, for mortal man, time has no dimension at all. We are like horses with blinders, seeing only what lies before us, forever guessing the future and fabricating the past. 

[Feb 2011]

by Paul Park
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 2002
A retired widower travels back to his son’s death during an operation in which his heart is momentarily stopped.

 “Geoffrey,” I tried to say. He wasnt looking at me. He was staring through the bars of his cage, his arms as thin as the sticks of bamboo, as they had been toward the end. 

[Mar 2002]

The Fairly Odd Parents
created by Butch Hartman
First time travel: 26 Jan 2002

Young Timmy Turner has two fairly odd fairy parents who can grant wishes, but are always creating problems for Timmy to fix, including at least twice when he had to wish himself back in time: to the old west (“Old, Old West”) and to a pirate ship (“Odd Pirates”).

 Safetys for yellow bellies. 
—Timmy’s dad in “Odd, Odd West”

[Aug 2013]

Donnie Darko
by Richard Kelly (Kelly, director)
First release: 30 Jan 2002

For me, this cultish movie about a schizophrenic teenager presented a shallow understanding of both schizophrenia and time travel.

 I have reached the end of your book and there are so many things that I need to ask you. Sometimes Im afraid of what you might tell me. Sometimes Im afraid that youll tell me that this is not a work of fiction. I can only hope that the answers will come to me in my sleep. I hope that when the world comes to an end, I can breathe a sigh of relief, because there will be so much to look forward to. 

[Feb 2014]

by Robert Reed
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Feb 2002

Jonathon Colfax, Emperor of the Roman Empire, tells the story of his travel back from the 21st century and the intrigues of his rise to power.

Robert Reed is my favorite prolific short story author from around the turn of the millennium.

 What we should do is gather up a group of people, and train them, and then travel back in time and conquer the Roman Empire. 

[Jun 2002]

by Albert E. Cowdrey
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Mar 2002
Maks Hamilton, time-travel agent who lives centuries after the troubled times, must travel back to just before the disasters to kidnap a boy.

Albert E. Cowdrey is another of my favorite turn-of-the-millennium short story writers.

 Ive got a sense of justice. It amused me to kidnap the son of the man who kidnapped me. 

[May 2002]

DC’s The Time Machine
adapted by John Logan and Mike Collins
First publication: Mar 2002

Nicely done, giveaway comic with a 10-page teaser for the movie on slick paper.

 Will Mara be rescued? Will Alexander recover the time machine? Will he ever prevent Emmas death and return to 1903? For the answers, see “The Time Machine”—opening March 8—only in theaters! 

[Jan 2012]

Tomorrow Man
aka Time Shifters
by Doug Campbell (Campbell, director)
First release: 5 Mar 2002

Bryon, a murderer in the present day, steals a time-travel device from a cop in a secret government program so that he can go back to rescue his ten-year-old self from an abusive father. The kidnap plan succeeds, but the father gloms onto the pursuing cop as she returns to the future, and together they chase after Byron (old) and Byron (young) with lots of gunfights.

 Hes kidnapped himself, his younger self. Ifs difficult to understand, but crap like this happens. 

[Oct 2015]

Simon Wells’ The Time Machine
adapted by John Logan (Simon Wells, director)
First release: 8 Mar 2002

This version (definitely not your grandfather’s time machine) has imaginative settings, but for me, the refactored plot was all dramatic music and no substance.

 You built your time machine because of Emmas death. If she had lived, it would never have existed. So how could you use your machine to go back in time and save her? You are the inescapable result of your tragedy, just as I am the inescapable result of you. You have your answer. Now go. 

[Aug 2011]

by Milcho Manchevski (Manchevski, director)
First release: 5 Apr 2002

A reliable source (well, TV Guide) told me this would be a thought-provoking time-travel Western. I can affirm that the first of those double-barreled adjectives is inaccurate; it’s harder to tell about the second, even after surviving the incomprehensible story of two brothers in the old west (and Macedonia), a mean-spirited woman in the present, and a black dude who may have had his thumbs broken by crooked present-day police (or possibly he broke them at the Alamo).

 Edge: Whats you gonna do with this stupid story anyway?
Angela: Youll see at the end.
Michael: Only if you survive that long. 

[Sep 2013]

The Chronology Protection Case (Movie)
adapted by Jay Kensinger (Kensinger, director)
First released: 20 Apr 2002

Stilted acting and hokey science, but still an enjoyable, low-budget adaptation with a believable version of D’Amato.

 Everything is related to each other on some level, and people have discovered that the deeper you go, the more you find that totally different things are made of the same thing. 

[Feb 2012]

“Hot Tip”
by Billy Bruce Winkles
First publication: Analog, May 2002
Obscure physicist John Suttle receives a phone call from the future with information about his eventual fate.

 As I said, Im calling you from the twenty-fifth century. I am also a physicist. In fact, Im the leader of a research group thats studying space-time contortion phenomena. Recently, we discovered a way to make phone calls into the past. 

[May 2002]

created by J.J. Abrams and Matt Reeves
First time travel: 1 May 2002

High school senior Felicity Porter follows Ben to college in New York and mopes around him for four years before he cheats on her, so (in the final five episodes of the series) her friend Meghan casts a spell to send her back in time where she can be with Noel who’s always had a crush on her although now he’s not quite so certain, after all there is that Hannah girl.

 Next time be a more responsible time traveler. 
—Meghan to Felicity

[Jun 2012]

“When Bertie Met Mary”
by John Morressy
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jun 2002

A time traveler seeks Dr. Frankenstein.

 The time traveler—for so I must call him—emerged from his laboratory with a small wooden box cradled in his hands. 

[May 2002]

Odyssey 5
created by Manny Coto
First time travel: 21 Jun 2002

Five shuttle astronauts in orbit watch the mysterious destruction of the Earth, after which an alien offers to send their consciousnesses back in time five years to solve the mystery and save the earth. For me, it was the melodramatic music, weak scientific concepts and weaker dialog that fated this show to one season, although they did take on some interesting questions about how the crew’s actionsmay alter time.

 I . . . have it in my power . . . to project you back. 

[Jun 2015]

Austin Powers in Goldmember
by Mike Myers and Michael McCullers (Jay Roach, director)
First released: 26 Jul 2002

When the Austin Power’s father is kidnapped and taken to 1975 by the evil Goldmember, the famous spy must follow in the Pimpmobile.

 Powers: Where’s Goldmember?!
Dr. Evil: Not where, Mr. Powers—when! 

[Feb 2012]

“Time and Again”
by Betsy Gallup
First publication: Revolution SF, 8 Aug 2002

Some years after Cassie has given up her career to be a full-time mom, it occurs to her that she might use the beta version of her mother’s invention, the Redux 3000, to make life a little different.

 Her mom had spent a lifetime researching time travel and The Redux bracelet was the result. Cassie was one of several test subjects asked to test the new technology. 

[Dec 2013]

Megas XLR
created by Jody Schaeffer and George Krstic
First publication: 23 Aug 2002

In the pilot show (called “Lowbrow” and aired on a Cartoon Network Weekend Summerfest), two video-game gearheads (Coop and Jamie) find a time-traveling robot in a junkyard and trick him out with a new engine, some new body work, a 671 jimmy huffer, and an eight-ball gear shift before realizing that they (along with the redhead, Kiva, from the future) must now protect present-day Earth from the evil aliens who enslaved the planet in the future and are now tracking the Megas back through time.

After the pilot, the Cartoon Network picked up the show for 26 new episodes.

 Listen! We need Megas to avert an alien invasion in the far future. He wasnt meant to be a toy for a prehistoric yahoo and his pet monkey thing! 

[May 2015]

¡Mucha Lucha!
created by Eddie Mort and Lili Chin
First time travel: 31 Aug 2002

Just one time-travel episode (“Woulda Coulda Hasbeena”) in this forgetable series when the three kids’ teacher heads back to the land-of-disco to right-a-wrong in his past, and the kids follow.

 Traveling back in time to change the outcome of a wresting match is so against the code of Mas Wrestling that it will rip our world apart at the seams! 

[May 2015]

by Christopher Evans
First publication: Interzone, Sep 2002
A cynical innkeeper for time travelers whines.
[Jan 2003]

The Twilight Zone (3rd Series)
created by Rod Serling
First time travel: 2 Oct 2002

One season with 4 time-travel episodes.

 Cradle of Darkness (2 Oct 2002)   to kill baby Hitler
Found and Lost (27 Nov 2002)relive your past
Rewind (5 Feb 2003)short time ago
Memphis (26 Feb 2003)MLK in 1968

 I reminded them that Adolph Hitler was responsible for the deaths of 60 million people. 

[Dec 2010]

Do Over
created by Kenny Schwartz and Rick Wiener
First episode: 19 Sep 2002

Thirty-something Joel Larsen, disappointed in his life, finds himself back in 9th grade with a chance to do things over again.

 That, young time traveler, is your first kiss. 

[Sep 2013]

The Chronology Protection Case (Radio)
adapted by Mark Shanahan, Paul Levinson and Jay Kensinger
First aired: Fall 2002

An enjoyable script based on the short story of the same name.

 But if you come across something you know to be true, one thing is certain: you can never go back to not knowing. 

[Feb 2012]

“At Dorado”
by Geoffrey A. Landis
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Oct/Nov 2002
Cheena’s husband comes back to the port around the wormhole—dead, though the death is in the future, and she doesn’t bother to tell him.

 The wormholes were the ports very reason for existing, the center of Cheenas universe. 

[Nov 2002]

“The Time Telephone”
by Adam Roberts
First publication: Infinity Plus, Oct 2002

A pregnant woman calls her future daughter at age sixteen (at a cost of nearly 18,000 euros) to find out whether the daughter was glad she was born—and she’s not the only one calling into the past.

 This is a call from the past, my darling. 

[Apr 2014]

Time Changer
by Rich Christiano (Christiano, director)
First release: 25 Oct 2002

Nineteenth-century biblical scholar Russell Carlisle is sent forward 100 years to see what the world will become of people’s morals if they are allowed to accept or reject Christianity willie-nillie.

 Stop the movie! You must stop this movie! The man on the screen just blasphemed the name of the lord! 

[Oct 2015]

“Walk to the Full Moon”
by Sean McMullen
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Dec 2002
Undergraduate linguist Carlos helps his uncle try to understand a pre-neanderthal girl who has appeared in present-day Spain.

 On a monitor screen was a girl in a walled garden. Crouching in a corner, she had a fearful, hunted look about her. I could see that she wore a blanket, that her skin was olive-brown, and that her features were bold and heavy. Oddly enough, it took a while for me to notice the most remarkable about her: she had no forehead! 

[Dec 2002]

Das Jesus Video
English title: Ancient Relic (translated from German)
aka The Hunt for the Hidden Relic
adapted by Martin Ritzenhoff and Sebastian Niemann (Niemann, director)
First aired: 5 Dec 2002 (made-for-tv)

Stephen Vogt, an archaeology student, uncovers a 2000-year-old skeleton and the man’s notes purporting to have taken a video of Jesus Christ on a camera that doesn’t yet exist. The result is a 3-hour blood-filled, melodramatic chase that, for me, detracted from the more interesting religious questions that the premise might have addressed.

The two-part German tv movie was based on the book Jesus Video by Andreas Eschbach with some significant changes to the ending. It was released in the US with a quality English dubbing in 2006.

 Gentlemen, sleep well tonight. And dont forget that we are scientists and not science fiction writers. 

[Jul 2015]

“Time Loop”
by Sam Hughes
First publication:, 14 Dec 2002

I first encountered Sam Hughes while desperately trying to figure out the ending to the remake of Planet of the Apes; in addition to excellent speculation on that count, he had this short-short story about a time loop (later made into a fun youtube video by Andrew Hookway).

 I am your future self, and I just traveled back in time to meet you. 

[Dec 2011]

“O. Henry’s Incredible Time-Travel Adventure”
by Lucas Gattuso
First publication: Gattuso’s English 127 Portfolio, circa 2003

Someone is killing those damnable authors who use only their initials, and only H.G. Wells and his time machine can save O. Henry and the rest.

 e.e. cummings at your service 

[May 2012]

The Time Traveler’s Wife
by Audrey Niffenegger
First publication: 2003

Due to a genetic disorder, Henry DeTamble reacts to stress by jumping to important and unimportant moments of his life, including many visits to his once and future wife.

To me, the story owes a lot to one of F.M. Busby's stories (“If This Is Winnetka, You Must Be Judy”)—a debt that Niffenegger might be acknowledging in the quote below.

 Could I? Do I have kids, Henry? In 2006 do I have a husband and a house in Winnetka and 2.5 kids? 

[Dec 2010]

“Train of Events”
by James L. Cambias
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Jan 2003
Jeremy Calder has been told by time travelers that he will cause the release of a deadly virus. No one is allowed to stop him—for he hasn’t done anything yet—and he seems to accept his fate without believing that he can change future history.

 Since the history books all agreed that he was going to kill six hundred people on June 25, 2038, Jeremy Calder was careful to get up early that day. 

[Jan 2003]

“Legions in Time”
by Michael Swanwick
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apr 2003
Ellie Voigt’s job is to sit and watch a door, until one day she gets angry enough at Mr. Tarblecko that she steps through the door into a time war.

 One man with a sunstroker can be overwhelmed by savages equipped with nothing more than neutron bombs—if there are enough of them, and they dont mind dying! 

[Mar 2012]

John Allemand’s
interior illustration

“The Day the Track Stood Still”
by John C. Bodin and Ron Collins
First publication: Analog, May 2003
Did I spot a smidgen of time travel in this delightful story of a race where Babs the car is certainly in love with the driver and vice versa, all in the tense context of knowing that if the race is lost, then the car will be forfeited?

 I tried not to think about what was at stake. The pressure was bad enough without telling her this was for all the marbles: if we lost this Indy 500, she was gone. Sayonara muchacha. Hasta la bye-bye, and good night, Babs. Thats the way it is when you race the Barada. They put up a piece of tech, you put up a piece of tech. Winner takes all, Indy 500 style. 

[Sep 2012]

“Get Me to the Job on Time”
by Ian Randal Strock
First publication: Analog, May 2003
A man tells the story of his coworker who had a rather mundane use for his discovery of time travel.

 Wally didnt need to see the pyramids getting built, or sail with Columbus, or even watch JFKs assassination. What Wally wanted to do, more than anything, was get to work on time. 

[Sep 2012]

The Low Budget Time Machine
aka Space Babes Meet Monsters
by Buddy Barnett, Kathe Duba-Barnett, Brad Linaweaver, et. al. (Duba-Barnett, director)
First release: May 2003

The main question in my mind as I watched this was how destitute did Patrick MacNee become at the end of his life to be found in this movie telling us about his theory of time travel. I never did figure out what all that had to do with the subsequent story of a professor who owes big money to the mob. The professor’s solution is to send three patsies into the future to bring something back that will end all his monetary troubles. As it turns out, the future has ethereal, never-been-kissed babes from outer space with excellent bowling balls (no, not a euphemism), at least one two-headed mutant, and a monster named Gary. Eventually, they all make it back to the present (except for Two-Head) where they form a rock band that Howard Stern would approve of.

 First I should explain in laymans terms the way time travel works. If you create an instrument that generates five billion electomagnetic transit vibrations per second—faster than the speed of light—one can hypothetically travel through time and space. 

[Jul 2015]

“3rd Corinthians”
by Michael F. Flynn
First publication: Analog, Jun 2003
This is the second Michael F. Flynn time-travel story that I’ve read set in O Daugherty’s Irish pub. This time, amidst philosophical discussion, Father McGinnity tells of a third letter from Paul to the Corinthians that simply couldn’t be genuine.

 Oh, the Bible is true, only it may not always be factual. 

[May 2003]

Static Shock Cartoon
created by Dwayne McDuffie and Michael Davis
First time travel: 7 Jun 2003

Based on the DC comic book, fourteen-year-old superhero Virgil Hawkins, aka Static, has power over electromagnetism, but its his friend Nina, aka Time-Zone, who takes him and another hero through time in their first trek through time, trying to save Virgils mother.

 Flashback (7 Jun 2003)Nina’s first travel
Future Shock (17 Jan 2004)   forty years forward

 She can rewind herself through time like a tape through a VCR! 

[Jul 2013]

T3: Rise of the Machines
by John Brancato, Michael Ferris and Tedi Sarafian (Jonathan Mostow, director)
First release: 02 Jul 2003

If they can’t get John Connor, then the machines from 2029 will send a T-X terminator for his lietenants in 2004, but they don’t count on John sending back another Model 101 to work with John and his future wife Kate.

 Get in! Do you wanna live?! Come on! 
—John Connor to Kate Brewster while fleeing the T-X

[Dec 2010]

created by Wilson Coneybeare
First episode: 5 Jul 2003

When Shakira or Alex ask questions about life of yore, Sam and Jen take them back to see for themselves.

 And now they take me back in time to find out what life in the past was really like. 

[Feb 2014]

English title: Popotan (translated from Japanese)
by Jukki Hanada
First episode: 17 Jul 2003

Three young sisters—Ai, Mai and Mii—and their maid find themselves continually jumping from place to place and time to time.

 Why do we have to keep moving, over and over again? Its so unfair! 

[Apr 2014]

“The Only-Known Jump Across Time”
by Eugene Mirabelli
First publication: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sep 2003
In the 1920s, Lydia Chase and her father’s tailor fall in love and jump across time.

 The only known jump across time produced by an apparatus, a so-called time machine, took place in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in May of 1928. 

[Sep 2003]

Code Lyoko
English title: Code Lyoko (translated from French)
created by Tania Palumbo and Thomas Romain
First episdoe: 3 Sep 2003

As you watch the first few episodes of this French nearly-anime cartoon (dubbed in English), there’s a challenge in working out exactly what’s what in the group of young friends at a boarding school where the resident genius (Jeremy Belpois) interacts with a girl (Aelita) who's trapped in a virtual world which is terrorized by the evil Xana. I suspect I may have missed a few episodes at the start (I started with “Teddygozila”), but it seems that at the end of each successful adventure in the virtual world, the supercomputer take the adventurers back in time to a point of their choosing. It’s kind of cool that things aren’ fully explained, so I hope I don’t later run into the origin episode!

 Ready for a trip into the past, Yumi? 

[Jul 2013]

Timecop: The Berlin Decision
aka Timecop 2
adapted by Gary Scott Thompson (Steve Boyum, director)
First release: 30 Sep 2003 (direct to video)

Time Enforcement Commission agent (and martial arts expert) Ryan Chang chases through time after rogue agent Brandon Miller whos off killing ancestors of other agents so therell be nobody to stop him from what he sees as a moral obligation to right the wrongs of past timelines (but no obligation to fill the holes in the current plotline).

Despite my reservations, my friend Tandy, a martial arts afficionada, enjoyed the movie a lot (only partly because she’s in love with Jason Scott Lee), and it is true that even my favorite time-travel movies have some of the same plot holes as this one, all of which yeilds an extra star in my subjective rating!

 Drop the gun or your timeline is over. 

[Jul 2013]

Tru Calling
created by Jon Harmon Feldman
First episode: 30 Oct 2003

From time to time, a dead guy asks morgue worker Tru Davies for help, which causes her day to rewind and gives her a chance to save the dead person with the help of her shy boss Davis and her neer-do-well brother Harry.

Hannah gave me the dvd of the first season for Christmas, and it took a few episodes for the show to grow on me. I was hooked about halfway through the season, with the introduction of Jack Harper and the suggestions of an overarching plot.

 Have a little faith in your sister. 

[Jun 2012]

“It’s All True”
by John Kessel
First publication: Sci Fiction, 5 Nov 2003

In 2048, washed-up film maker Det Gruber is a time-traveling talent scout hired to recruit young, bitter Orson Welles from 1942.

 Welles clenched his fists. When he spoke it was in a lower tone. “Life is dark.” 

[Dec 2013]

adapted by Jeff Maguire and George Nolfi (RIchard Donner, director)
First release: 26 Nov 2003

The book was interminably slow, and so was the movie—and I’m only talking about the battle scenes in 1357 France. The actual time-travel mechanism is cool, though.

 It means the camera was taking pictures in the wilderness near Castlegard, France, in the year 1357. 

[Mar 2014]

Kim Possible
by Bill Motz and Bob Roth (Steve Loter, director)
First time travel: 28 Nov 2003

Buffy has nothing on high school cheerleader Kim Possible, who fought time-traveling badies and their time monkey in a special one-hour episode (“A Sitch in Time”).

 “So, whats the sitch?” 

[Sep 2013]

“The Chop Line”
by Stephen Baxter
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2003
In the future wars between man and Xeelee, Ensign Daxx meets the time-traveling future Captain Dakk who must try the younger Dakk for the future crime of disobeying orders in a combat situation.

 I dont know many captains, but she immediately recognized me. 

[Nov 2003]

“Tune Out of Time”
by Philip E. High
First publication: Step to the Stars, 2004

Philip E. High was a prolific author, although not well known in the states. This story, first published when he was 89, tells the tale of the miraculous Mottram’s organ, which unexpectedly sends Alan Stapleton to the past (or is it the future?) on an obscure fragment of matter called Earth—and he may find himself in several other locations before he finds his way home.

 I deduce that this device was locked on the past—whos past, yours or ours? Time is relative, our future could be in your past or vice versa. 

[Apr 2014]

The story also appeared in this 2008 collection.
by Michael Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2004
Astronaut gets put in a time loop by aliens.

 Aaron snorted. “I remember that conversation from over six months ago.”
    Gabe shook his head. “It happened this morning.”

[Feb 2004]

“The Dragon Wore Trousers”
by Bob Buckley
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2004
A dinosaur scientist time travels to the middle ages.

 The bizarre beast that rounded the bend in the road made Makers mouth drop in surprise. It was like nothing he had ever seen before, a top-heavy, lopsided creature having four legs, a narrow head atop a long neck, and a huge shiny lump on its back. 

[Feb 2004]

by Shane Carruth (Carruth, director)
First released: 16 Jan 2004

Some guys invent a time machine and use it to go back in time to prevent the artsy author of this film from ever writing a coherent plot.

 I havent eaten since later this afternoon. 

[Sep 2010]

The Butterfly Effect
by Eric Bress and J. Mackye Gruber (Gruber and Bress, directors)
First release: 23 Jan 2004

Scary, dark, disturbing, sick and violent —but captivating— psychological thriller about how things keep going further and further astray when Evan tries to fix things by changing key moments involving the sociopaths and child molesters of his troubled childhood.

 Hey man, Id think twice about what youre doing. You could wake up a lot more fucked up than you are now. 

[Feb 2011]

“Scout’s Honor”
by Terry Bisson
First publication: Sci Fiction, 28 Jan 2004
An autistic paleontologist receives a series of messages from a time traveler who is studying a band of Neanderthals in prehistoric Europe, although his one friend, Ron, thinks that the messages are an amateur sf story.

 Heading down for the NT site. More later. 

[Mar 2012]

“Century to Starboard”
by Liz Williams
First publication: Strange Horizons, 2 Feb 2004

Sometime around the publication of this story, Tim and I saw a ship called The World docked on the Willamette in Portland. The ship is privately owned by the occupants of its 165 residences, and as a group they vote on their itinerary every year. It’s a nice fantasy to think about leading such a life, so long as the ship doesn’t run into the kind of storms that Liz Williams’s similar ship hits in this story.

Each of those storms take the entire ship, including Italian citizen Vittoria Pellini, further and further into the future.

 I finally got my head together and told Julio what I thought—that maybe, just maybe, weve gone through some kind of slip in time, like the Bermuda Triangle, only in the Pacific. I know other people sometimes say—just to be spiteful—that Im maybe a little bit of a bimbo, and Julio tends to laugh at me sometimes. Affectionately, of course. But this time I really thought hed laugh, and he didnt. 

[Jun 2015]

“Draft Dodgers Rag”
by Jeff Hecht
First publication: Analog, Mar 2004
Time travelers come back to 1969 Berkeley to help Tom, a Vietnam draft dodger.

 They want to be heroes. They think war brings glory and makes them men. I think theyre crazy. Our society up then thinks theyre crazier than your society thinks you are. 

[Mar 2004]

created by Alfred Gough and Miles Millar
First time travel: 3 Mar 2004

Ten seasons with at least 9 time-travel episodes:

 Crisis (3 Mar 2004)phone call from the next day
Reckoning (26 Jan 2006)back in time to save Lana
Sleeper (24 Apr 2008)Kara and Brainiac back to infant Kal-El
Apocalypse (1 May 2008)Clark back to stop Kara and Brainiac
Legion (15 Jan 2009)The Legion (plus Persuader) from 31st century
Infamous (12 Mar 2009)Clark back to stop Lois from writing a story
Doomsday (14 May 2009)Lois to the future
Savior (25 Sep 2009)Lois returns, persued by Alia
Homecoming (15 Oct 2010)   Clark to his own past and future

 Chloe: When you were a baby. Clark, if you really are in trouble on Krypton, youd better find a way to get there, and soon, or . . .
Clark: Ill never have existed. 
—from “Sleeper”

[Oct 2001]

Tripping the Rift
created by Chris Moeller and Chuck Austen
First time travel: 4 Mar 2004

What if Star Trek/Wars were an adult cartoon with time travel on demand, including travel back to the start of the universe in the broadcast pilot, “God is Our Pilot”?

 God Is Our Pilot (4 Mar 2004)to beginning of universe
Roswell (14 Sep 2005)1940s New Mexico
Chode Eraser (6 Sep 2007)Terminator parody

 Chode: Hey, you know what the best part of being able to go back to the beginning of time means?
Whip: Yeah. Not having to remember what you did yesterday.
Chode: Yeah, that. And were gonna know once and for all how the universe was created. 

[Jul 2015]

“The Aztec Supremacist”
by Sheralyn Schofield Belyeu
First publication: Analog, Apr 2004
Dr. Harvey takes a posse back to 1492 to pursue an Aztec descendant who plans to stop Columbus’s voyage.

 Gentlemen, this person tells me that in many years, the Almighty will allow men to journey through time. He says that he has come from the far future with a message for me. 

[Apr 2004]

The Winning Season
adapted by Steve Bloom (John Kent Harrison, director)
First aired: 4 Apr 2004 (made-for-tv)

Eleven-year-old Joe Soshack finds a priceless 1909 baseball card (never mind that it belongs to that little old-lady down the street) that takes him back to the 1909 World Championship Series where he becomes a not-very-loyal sidekick to the Pittsburgh Pirate’s Honus Wagner in a face-off against the Detroit Tigers and the vicious Ty Cobb.

 You know Ive had people come from all over the world to see me play baseball, but Ive never had someone come from the future. 

[Jul 2015]

“This Tragic Glass”
by Elizabeth Bear
First publication: Sci Fiction, 7 Apr 2004

In a world where time travel can retrieve past historical figures, Dr. Satyavati Brahmaptura (now a colleague of poet John Keats) receives permission from the History Department to nab Christopher Marlowe in order to prove that he was really a she.

 The genderbot still thinks Kit Marlowe was a girl. I reentered everything. 

[Dec 2013]

13 Going On 30
by Josh Goldsmith and Cathy Yuspa (Gary Winick, director)
First release: 23 Apr 2004

Everything that could go wrong is going wrong for 13-year-old Jenna Rink. If only she could be already grown up in the future!

 There are six of them, Jenna, thats the whole point. There cant be a seventh Sixth Chick. Its just mathematically impossible. Besides youre way cooler than they are, theyre totally unoriginal. 

[Jul 2007]

“A Taste of Time”
by Abby Goldsmith
First publication: Deep Magic, May 2004

A bottle of wine mysteriously appears inside Jane’s apartment on her 29th birthday with the cryptic message Tabula Rasa—Warning: There Is No Return. So since she is suicidal and drunk and other things associated with country music songs, Jane swallows a mouthful, figuring that the worst it could be is a dignified poison.

 Jane gagged on the sour taste in her mouth. She was so dizzy, shed fallen . . . but she was sitting in an office chair, with no memory whatsoever of leaving her dark and quiet apartment.
Florescent lights beat down on her, and the familiar voices of a call center surrounded her. None of this was possible. She was back at her old workplace. It was a workday, late afternoon, judging by the angle of light. Ultimata Insurance had laid her off months ago, yet here she was.

[Jul 2015]

Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law
created by Michael Ouweleen and Erik Richter
First time travel: 16 May 2004

After failing as part of a 1960s Hanna-Barbera cartoon, Birdman and the Galaxy Trio, Harvey Birdman is revived as an attorney whose clients are typically other hard-done-by Hanna-Barbera characters, including at least one episode where the Jetsons travel from the far future (thatd be 2002) to the present (2004), but my favorite is when Harvey has to defend Quick Draw “Eastwood” McGraw’s 2nd Ammendment rights.

 Ah, thats okay, great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-granddad. 
—George Jetson to Harvey

[Jul 2013]

“The Lost Pilgrim”
by Gene Wolfe
First publication: The First Heroes: New Tales of the Bronze Age, Jun 2004

Gene Wolfe has such subtle plots and such perfection of word choice that he lulls you into a story without your ever realizing that you are in a story—even his titles are perfection. In this case, the story of an apparant time traveler who finds himself on a journey with Greek gods and mortals, but cannot remember who he is or why he was sent to this far past.

 I have been hoping to speak privately with Amphiareaws about Times enmity. I know that I will not be born for many years. I know also that I have traveled the wrong way through those many years to join our crew. Was that in violation of Times ordinances? If so, it would explain his displeasure; but if not, I must look elsewhere. 

[Apr 2014]

“Time Ablaze”
by Michael Burstein
First publication: Analog, Jun 2004
Lucas Schmidt, time-traveler, goes back to 1904 to witness New York City’s most deadly tragedy: a ship full of German Americans on fire.

 A small piece of paper fell out of the book and onto the table. Adele picked it up and examined it. It bore one line: “” She had no idea what it meant; “http” was clearly not a word, although she presumed she knew what the “general-slocum” part referred to. 

[Apr 2004]

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
adapted by Steve Kloves (Alfonso Cuarón, director)
First release: 6 Apr 2004

As much as I fall completely into the Harry Potter books, I find all the movies drawn-out and boring, even this one which:
  • comes from my favorite of the books,
  • has a monster class taught by Hagrid,
  • has my favorite adult character, Sirius,
  • has time travel,
  • and (as always) has the perfectly cast Rupert Grint

 Hang on! Thats not possible. Ancient Runes is at the same time as Divination. Youd have to be in two classes at once. 

[Oct 2005]

Phil of the Future
created by Tim Maile and Douglas Tuber
First episode: 18 Jun 2004

Phil Duffy and his family, on vacation from the 22nd century in a rented time machine, are keeping it together just as best as they can now that they’ve ended up trapped right here in our time zone.

 ♫Meet a boy named Phil and his family
On vacation from the 22nd century
They got a rented time machine and theyre on their way
To a time way, way, way back in the day♫

[Jun 2007]

“To Emily on the Ecliptic”
by Thomas R. Dulski
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2004
As part of a therapy to overcome writer’s block, poet Maleus Taub uses an alien artifact Healing Chair to visit Emily Brontë and Emily Dickinson.

 We dont know how it works. Or even what its energy source is. When the field is on weve detected minor fluctuations in certain astronomical objects. 

[Jul 2004]

5ive Days to Midnight
by Robert Zappia, David Aaron Cohen, et. al. (Michael Watkins, director)
First aired: 7-10 Jun 2004

In this SciFi Channel miniseries, J.T. Neumeyer (physics professor, widower, and single dad) receives a briefcase from decades in the future containing a police file with the details of his murder five days hence. Once he accepts it as real, he has some success at changing fate by saving a woman from an accident— and then fate starts pushing back by killing her in a different accident, putting J.T. is on a track to meet his own fate.

 The future is not immutable—you can print that! 

[Apr 2012]

The 4400
created by René Echevarria and Scott Peters
First episode: 11 Jul 2004

Over the years, people of all ages and walks of life have been abducted. Now, 4400 of them have returned to a glen outside of Seattle, all at the same time and without any aging or memory of where—or when—they’ve been. We get to see how they fit back in or don’t, how they react to hostilities, how they use their powers such as young Maia Skouris who sees the future, 17-year-old bio-phenom Shawn Farrell who now has an eye for Nikki (not so young any more), and Richard who no longer has his life threatened for loving a white woman whom he’s managed to impregnate without sex.

 History tells us this is where the path to oblivion began. 

[Jul 2012]

by Vandana Singh
First publication: So Long Been Dreaming: Postcolonial Science Fiction & Fantasy, Sep 2004
Aseem, a sometimes suicidal man in Delhi, sees and interacts with past and future versions of the city while he searches for the woman whom a computer says is his purpose in life.

 A computer is like a beehive. Many bits and parts, none is by itself intelligent. Combine together and you have something that can think. 

[Apr 2014]

“The Hat Thing”
by Matthew Hughes
First publication: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Sep 2004
A nameless man tells another how to spot time travelers.

 Sure. Researchers. Tourists. Criminals altering their present by manipulating the past. Religious pilgrims. Collectors. Who knows what motivates people a million years from now? 

[Jan 2005]

by Christopher Kulikowski, Tom Reeve and Gianluca Curti (Kulikowski, director)
First release: 2 Nov 2004

Two centuries after a meteor lands in Antarctica, the deadly bacterial plague that it brought has spread around the world and threatens to wipe out all life. The solution: Go back in time and stop the meteor from ever being dug up, but John Foster, the leader of the expedition, will have to cope with his traveling companion’s vices as well as ice and bacteria.

I suppose the military uniforms of 2204 all look like Axis Powers uniforms because the movie was originally made in Italy. It was first released in Russia in 2004 and made it to the states by 2009. Of course, none of that explains why the timeship looks like a 1978 Battlestar Galactica castoff.

 Under your command, you will pilot the Porsifol back 200 years and track the cutters movement to the meteor field. Alter the timeline. Eradicate the scourge. 

[Oct 2015]

“Time’s Swell”
by Victoria Somogyi and Kathleen Chamberlain
First publication: Strange Horizons, 15 Nov 2004

When a woman awakes with no memory, she finds herself being taken care of by another woman who says that they have come from the future and cannot get back, so they prostitute themselves in various forms to make money and hesitantly take each other as lovers.

 And then there are the days when she tells me that weve traveled through time, that we have come from the future and are trapped here. She tells me that she was a temporal scientist, that I was her project. That I am modified and enhanced for survival, for time travel, for perfection. Those are the bad days. 

[Oct 2012]

“Small Moments in Time”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Dec 2004
A time traveler seeking lost seeds in the past finds a man who may have started the worst influenza of the 20th century.

 The odd truth of working as a temporal interventionist is that some there-and-thens are better than others. 

[Dec 2004]

Time and Again
by Jason J. Tomaric (Tomaric, director)
First release: 31 Dec 2004

No, not Jack Finney and not Clifford D. Simak either. This one is all Jason J. Tomaric.

Fourteen years ago (or maybe sixteen, the director’s not quite sure), teenaged Bobby Jones was convicted of a murder that he remembers nothing about. Fortunately, he escapes, and during the escape he finds himself transported back to his hometown on the day of the murder.

By the way, I interpret the story as more than just a dream because of the incident where young Bobby is injured and old Bobby immediately develops a scar (although I suppose that could be part of a dream, too).

 Look, Awanda, if you could go back in time and change anything—I mean anything at all—would you? 

[Jul 2015]

Das Cusanus-Spiel
English title: The Cusanus Game (translated from German)
by Wolfgang Jaschke
First publication: 2005

In an alternate Europe where isolationism is enforced by towering walls and the world is crumbling around them, a secret project aims to save the present by harvesting the past.

 Only on the basis of his theoretical work and predictions did Folkert Jensma and Koos van Laere the following year at the Christian Huygens Institute in the Hague prove the existence of so-called time solitons, which Thilawuntha had predicted. These disturbances traverse the flow of time in both directions, that is, they bring about with their passage momentary damming and acceleration in the temporal dimension. They thereby deform the structure of space-time, but are eo ipso not directly detectable by an observer situated within this strugture—that is, within our universe. Their existence can, however, be indirectly demonstrated, because their passage is accompanied by gravitational waves of various strength. 

[Jun 2015]

“The Destruction of Sennacherib”
by Bryn Sparks
First publication: Robots and Time, 2005

Lady Ada Lovelace, who has traveled through time via a Wells-type machine in a steampunk world, tells her story to an enamored compatriot who is 50 years older than when they last shared a conversation.

 It seemed the original analytical engine, the mechanical computer designed and built by my friend and mentor, the great Charles Babbage in the 1830s, had a lethal configuration that could lock up an entire engine if it were ever presented with the right sequence of calculations. The article went on to describe how all the miniaturized analytical engines at the heart of the empires technology were just small versions of the original analytical engine. No one had ever changed the fundamental arrangement of cogs and gears and drive trains and clutches. They had just been made smaller and linked together in greater numbers, so here at the turn of the century, I could be driven in a cab by a man whose very thoughts were determined by the workings of beings of microscopic versions of Babbages original design, all operating in parallel. 

[Aug 2013]

The Time Hackers
by Gary Paulsen
First publication: 2005
Twelve-year-old Dorso Clayman lives in a future where viewing the past is commonplace, but he and his friend Frank are being unpredictably pulled into the past!

Janet found this for me at the library in 2010.

 They might see a vision of a dinosaur one time and on the second try get an image of a man who might be Julius Caesar getting ready for a bath, or Anne Boleyn getting her head chopped off. 

[Dec 2010]

“A Few Good Men”
by Richard A. Lovett
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2005
Time travelers from a future without many men come back to our time to import what they need most, but they accidentally snatch Tiffany Richardson as well.

 There were eight good prospects back there, and Id have had them all if this bitch hadnt shown up. 

[Dec 2005]

by Louis Morneau and Philip Badger (David van Eyssen, director)
First release: 4 Feb 2005

Sean Astin plans to use his 10-minute time machine to repeatedly withdraw the same money from a bank teller that he’s chatting up, but a violent gang of other bank robbers throws a wrench into his plan.

 Did you ever wish you could keep doing the same thing over and over again? 

[Apr 2012]

The Jacket
by Tom Bleecker, Marc Rocco and Massy Tadjedin (John Maybury, director)
First release: 4 Mar 2005

Committed to the Alpine Grove asylum for a murder he didn’t commit, brain-damaged war veteran Jack Starks is subjected to sensory deprivation in a straightjacket, which sends him 15 years into the future for several hours at a time where he meets the adult version of Jackie, a small girl whom he briefly met and was kind to shortly before being incarcerated. He learns from Jackie that back in the asylum he has only a few days to live, and together, he and Jackie try to figure out a way to escape that fate.

The story is loosely based on Jack London’s The Star Rover, although London’s protagonist travels through the stars and into past lives. Using future information to change the present was never part of London’s story.

 No, no you didnt. Jack Starks did, and Jack Starks is dead. Hes dead. His body was found New Years Day, 1993, Alpine Grove. Hes dead. 

[Sep 2015]

“Letters of Transit”
by Brian Plante
First publication: Analog, Apr 2005
A scientist on the first near-lightspeed ship to Centauri A exchanges letters with his underaged girlfriend back on Earth through a wormhole for which time passes at the same rate on both ends. When the ship returns to Earth with its end of the wormhole, the hole will act as a time machine for messages, but the clichéd paradox police won’t let scientist send girlfriend any information about the future.

 You wouldnt want to cause any of those nasty paradoxes, would you? 

[Jan 2006]

“Message in a Bottle”
by Nalo Hopkinson
First publication: Futureways, 1 Apr 2005
An artist named Greg, who never wanted to have children, becomes close to Kamla, an adopted daughter of a friend; the situation works out fine, even when Greg does have an unexpected child with his girlfriend, and even when Kamla turns out to be one of the thousands of children with extremely slow-growing bodies and minds from the future.

 I'm from the Future, Says Bobble-Headed Boy. 

[Apr 2014]

“The Apotheosis of Martin Padway”
by S.M. Stirling
First publication: The Enchanter Completed: A Tribute for L. Sprague de Camp

Some 50 years after Martin Padway was thrown back to Byzantine times, a group of holy men and scientists travel back to the supposed date when the Great Man ascended to godhood.

 “Its definitely a past with Martinus of Padua in it. There are no other lines within several hundred chronospace-years that show a scientific-industrial revolution this early. Quantum factors make it difficult”—fucking meaningless—“to say if its precisely the line that led to us.” 

[Feb 2014]

Almost Normal
by Marc Moody (Moody, director)
First release: 26 May 2005

After a car accident, forty-something, gay, college professor Brad Jenkins who has never felt normal in Nebraska is thrown back to his high school days in an alternate universe where being gay is the norm and hetrosexuals are outcasts.

For me, the premise is original and was explored in a thoughtful (though sometimes farcical) way.

 Brad: I hate to sound like Michael J. Fox, but Im from the future.
Terry: Whos Michael J. Fox? 

[Sep 2015]

“Working on Borrowed Time”
by John G. Hemry
First publication: Analog, Jun 2005
Tom and his implanted AI Jeannie (from “Small Moments in Time”) are back again, this time trying to stop future Nazis from destroying Edwardian London.

 What? The British Empire started coming apart in the 1920s? 

[Jul 2005]

“The Starry Night”
by Barry Malzberg and Jack Dann
First publication: Sci Fiction, 22 Jun 2005

A visage of the universe exploding bounces back and forth between a space-faring priest, an epileptic six-year-old in our day, and Vincent Van Gogh.

 For the first time she is a little scared. She wishes that she were in her room, not in this space car with the stars glowing and exploding like the stars in Mr. Goghs painting. 

[Dec 2013]

by Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron (Nora Ephron, director)
First release: 24 Jun 2005

Not only does Isabel the witch want to live just like any normal woman, she also gets talked into playing the role of witch Samantha who wants to live just like any normal woman in a remake of Bewitched—and like the original Samantha, she has some trouble constraining her powers. Yes, she’s also an occasional failure at constraining her power to rewind the hands of time.

 No breakfast after eleven. 

[Jul 2007]

“Scream Quietly”
by Sheila Crosby
First publication: Farthing, Jul 2005

In 1849 England, Sophie’s abusive husband abuses her and beatys their one-year-old son, so at the first opportunity, she and her son flees to a friend’s house where they are visited by apparent faeries.

 They said they were not faeries, but men, “even as yourselne,” from the far distant future, and they were journeying in time! They were most astonished to hear this was the year of our Lord 1849, for they had believed themselves in 1343 and were in great fear of being burned as witches. 

[Jul 2015]

“The Time Traveler’s Wife”
by Scott William Carter
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2005
No, we’re not talking about that wife; we’re talking about Scott William Carter’s version—Yolanda Green, an even-keeled, mostly content wife of a university professor time traveler—and the story of what she does when he goes off into the future, failing to return for dinner.

 “Weve done it,” he said. “Three times with a mouse and five times with a monkey. The university has approved my request for a manned test run. Were going into the future! 

[Sep 2012]

Time Warp Trio
adapted by Kathy Waugh, et. al.
First episode: 9 Jul 2005

Ten-year-old Joe and his two mates Fred and Sam travel back and forth in time in these 22-minute Discovery Kids cartoons based on Jon Scieszka’s story series.

 Ever wonder how three kids from Brooklyn got their hands on a time-traveling book? 

[Mar 2013]

I have no image for the story, but here’s the first book in Colorado author Tobler’s series, The Rings of Anubis.
“Gauging Moonlight”
by E. Catherine Tobler
First publication: Sci Fiction, 20 Jul 2005

The alien narrator loves Alice Oxbridge, although the word love does not capture the feeling any more accurately than space travel captures climbing into a vehicle capable of carrying you off-planet. And our narrator has the power to erase the the moments of tragedy in Alice’s life, he cannot do so without breaking his one unbreakable tenet and becoming the prime example of sentient idiocy.

 Alice’s was not the first birth I witnessed, nor even the most unusual. The first time I saw Alice’s birth, I bypassed the event, skimming ahead to the advent of the automobile. Gears fascinated me more. But on reflection, something drew me back to Alice in the garden, newborn on the rain-wet grass. The world seemed to move beneath her. 

[Oct 2012]

“Fleet of Ages”
by Jared Axelrod
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 5 Aug 2005

Axelrod is one of the founders of 365 Tomorrows, which presents a piece of flash fiction every day of the year, and this was their first time-travel story, a story in which ships bring items from the future with unpredictable consequences.

 I used to think that, more than any man, I understood the consequences of what those ships were supposed to bring back. 

[May 2015]

Kat Beyer’s
illustration for her story

“The Strange Desserts of
Professor Natalie Doom”

by Kat Beyer
First publication: Strange Horizons, 22 Aug 2005

For Natalie, it isn’t easy growing up as the only human creation of a mad scientist (including a time machine, of course) and his gorgeous, shapely wife— especially when you have the name of Natalie Doom and a leaning toward feminism).

 Apparently I inherited Mamas looks and Papas brains. Again and again in my life Ive gotten the best of a bad bargain. 

[Oct 2012]

“Paradox & Greenblatt, Attorneys at Law”
by Kevin J. Anderson
First publication: Analog, Sep 2005
Marty Paramus and his partner specialize in legal nuances arising from the new time-travel technology.

 So you figured that if you kept Franklins biological mother and father from meeting, he would never have been born, your parents marriage would have remained happy, and your life would have remained wonderful. 

[Aug 2005]

The story also appeared in this 2007 collection.
“Triceratops Summer”
by Michael Swanwick
First publication: Amazon Shorts, Sep 2005
An incident at the Institute for Advanced Physics brings a herd of Triceratops to present-day Vermont, which is certainly a worry, but according to Everett McCoughlan of the Institute, that will be the least of our worries by the end of the summer.

 Everything ends eventually. But after all is said and done, its waht we do in the meantime that matters, isnt it? 

[Mar 2014]

Hyams’ Sound of Thunder
adapted by Donnelly, Oppenheimer, Poirier (Peter Hyams, director)
First release: 2 Sep 2005

The time safari is not improved by 90 minutes of melodramatic nonsense.

 A butterfly caused all this? 

[Jul 2011]

“Who Forever Belongs To”
by Jared Axelrod
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 4 Oct 2005

In his second time-travel story, 365 Tomorrow founder Jared Axelrod has a rummage sale aficionado stumble across a time machine and philosophically discuss why the owner would let it go for five dollars.

 So when I unearthed the device from under a seriously disturbing collection of polyester sweaters, I knew it was something to treasure. I just didnt know what. 

[Jun 2015]

The Diving Universe Series
by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
First story: Asimov’s Science Fiction, Dec 2005
I haven’t followed all of the stories in Rusch’s Diving Universe, so I can’t tell you which of the stories and novels have a significant time-traveling aspect caused by the space-folding anacopa. But in “Becoming One with the Ghosts” (Asimovs, Oct/Nov 2010), the starship Ivoire gets folded 5000 years into the future. Later, while trying to shut down an anacapa drive gone bad in “Encounter on Starbase Kappa” (Asimovs, Oct/Nov 2013), Captain Jonathan “Coop” just might have a chance to return the ship and the crew to their own time.

 A. Diving into the Wreck (Dec 2005)Asimovs
B. Room of Lost Souls (Apr/May 2008)Asimovs
The Spires of Denon (Apr/May 2009)Asimovs
Diving into the Wreck (Nov 2009)includes parts of A and B
Becoming One with the Ghosts (Oct/Nov 2010)Asimovs
Becalmed (Apr/May 2011)Asimovs
City of Ruins (May 2011)
Stealth (Oct/Nov 2011)Asimovs
The Spires of Denon (Apr/May 2009)Asimovs
Boneyards (Jan 2012)
Skirmishes (Apr 2013)
Strangers at the Room of Lost Souls (May 2013)Asimovs
The Application of Hope (Aug 2013)Asimovs
Encounter on Starbase Kappa (Oct/Nov 2013)Asimovs

 Later, he learned that the anacapa malfunctioned, buringing him and his crew five thousand years into their future. 

[Feb 2015]

Chasing Christmas
by Todd Berger (Ron Oliver, director)
First aired: 4 Dec 2005 (mad-for-tv)

Jack Cameron, a Christmas grump, is taken back to 1965 by the ghost of Christmas Past who then decides to stay there, putting Jack and the cosmos at risk. It’s then up to Christmas Present to save the day, although in the end it’s dues ex machina rather than Present who fixes things.

 Past: Charles Dickens was a former target of ours who chose to write a book about his experiences even though we explicitly told him not to.
Jack: But it was a great book—
Past: It was crap, like everything he did! Did you ever read A Tale of Two Cities? ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst . . .’ Make up your mind, Mr. Dickens! 

[Jul 2015]

“Written in Plaster”
by Rajnar Vajra
First publication: Analog, Jan/Feb 2006
Thirteen-year-old Danny Levan is a bullied, half-Jewish boy in 1938 Surrey when he discovers strangely colored bits of plaster that can reform into what can only be described as his own protective time-traveling golem.

 A pack of chips was constantly pursuing and reuniting with the giant, but moonlight glinted off of one largish piece that seemed in danger of being left behind, lodged in a groove between cobblestones.
   “Wait,” Danny called out softly and although the creature was obviously too far off to hear, and lacked ears besides, it immediately paused long enough for the chip to free itself and join the others.

[Dec 2005]

Life on Mars [UK]
created by Matthew Graham, Tony Jordan and Ashley Pharoah
First episode: 9 Jan 2006

While working on murder case that has drawn in his girlfriend, Manchester Police Detective Sam Tyler is hit by a car and thrown into 1973 where DCI Hunt, WPC Cartwright, and everyone else in the district believes him to be a detective on loan.

 I had an accident, and I woke up 33 years in the past. Now that either makes me a time traveler or a lunatic or . . . Im lying in a hospital bed in 2006 and none of this is real. 

[Jan 2015]

The Plot to Save Socrates
by Paul Levinson
First book: Feb 2006

Young doctoral student Sierra chases back to ancient Alexandria after her professor who seems to be chasing after a time traveler who is trying to get Socrates to abandon Athenian death row for the future.

Although I haven’t seen a second novel, a sequel novella called “Unburning Alexandria” featured Sierra chasing around 410 A.D. Alexandria.

 If I, today, had finished constructing a device, in this room, which allowed you to travel even a day into the past, and you used it to travel into the past to kill or otherwise distract me from completing the device, how would you have been able to travel in the first place into the past, with no device then constructed? 

[Aug 2012]

created by Jeffrey Lieber, J.J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof
First time travel: 8 Feb 2006

Sadly, I never bonded with Lost, the six-season story of plane crash survivors on a supernatural island, but Tim assures me that I must list it with at least four stars.

 Sayid: Radio waves at this frequency bounce off the ionosphere. They can travel thousands of miles. It could be coming from anywhere.
Hurley: Or any time . . .

Fetching Cody
by David Ray and Carolyn Allain (Ray, director)
First release: 24 Feb 2006

Druggie Art finds his girlfriend in an overdose coma, so he gets in a time-traveling chair to go back and set things right—like The Butterfly Effect, but with no horror-flick tension.

 Okay, okay, take me back before Cody got sick, before she got all fucked up, when there were bullies and shit. 

[Apr 2014]

created by matt berry and rich fulcher
First publication: 27 Feb 2006

Rich and Matt wend their way through 28 minutes of dark, f-bombed weirdness in six episodes, each of which includes a trip in time through a door marked 1888. My own preference in British comedy is for Basil Fawlty, but sadly, he never traveled through time.

 Not that one! Its out of order. Use the other door. 

[Sep 2015]

Always Will
by Michael Sammaciccia (Sammaciccia, director)
First release: Mar 2006

Will, a high school senior, discovers how to use a stolen time capsule to go back in time and relive moments over and over until he gets it right.

 Seriously, it lets me, like, revisit a moment in the past. 

[Jul 2013]

Kachelries’s early stories appeared in this 2007 collection.
“Dropping a Pebble in a Dry Well”
by Kathy Kachelries
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 13 Apr 2006

Demetri Thornwick is pissed by the D- he received on a term paper that computes the MDZC for changes made even when DT>200 years.

 The arguments always center on the Maximum Disruption with Zero Consequences (MDZC). You know, whats the most I can change without screwing up the primary timeline. 

[May 2015]

by Matt Power and Dana Lee (Power, director)
First release: 25 Apr 2006

Medieval boy Throg becomes immortal after Urshag the Destroyer chops off his arms and Hades gives him the power of regeneration, after which he lives a long time through badly written Monty Python imitations until the touching end. Granted that immortality is not time travel, but Hades does manage a moment of time travel for Throg along the way.

 Get that fire started yet, boy? 

[Jul 2015]

by Randall Munroe
First time travel: Comic 103, 15 May 2006

Nerdy Randall Munroe’s quirky stick figures don’t shy away from the difficut time-travel tropes.


 Comic 103 (15 May 2006)Back to the Future
Comic 239 (23 Mar 2007)Blagofaire from the Future
Comic 567 (10 Apr 2009)Ben Franklin Urgent Mission
Comic 630 (31 Aug 2009)Megan’s Time Travel
Comic 652 (21 Oct 2009)Come with Me If You Want . . .
Comic 656 (30 Oct 2009)Doc Brown on Oct 30
Comic 657 (2 Nov 2009)Primer Time Chart
Comic 716 (19 Mar 2010)Time Machine
Comic 730 (21 Apr 2010)DeLorean flux capacitor
Comic 887 (3 Sep 2014)Rowling’s Time Turners
Comic 935 (8 Aug 2011)Babe Ruth & the Tardis
Comic 1063 (1 Jun 2012)Kill Hitler
Comic 1177 (22 Feb 2013)More Terminator
Comic 1191 (27 Mar 2013)The Past Oil Reserves
Comic 1203 (24 Apr 2013)Useless Time Machines
Comic 1256 (26 Aug 2013)Why Are There Two Spocks?

 Why are you so obsessed with this Hitler guy? 

[Feb 2007]

“Suspension of Disbelief”
by B. York
First publication: 365 Tomorrows, 31 May 2006

According to young Aaron’s buddy Hamel, once people get time machines, there’s no telling which descendants are going to bite the dust.

 If, forty years ago, some madman had come and swiped our parents, neither of us would be around. So forty years ago, we could stop existing. 

[May 2015]

The Lake House
by David Auburn (Alejandro Agresti, director)
First release: 16 Jun 2006

Letters—eventually love letters—pass back and forth between Dr. Kate Foster and architect Alex Wyler who are two years apart in time.

Based on the Korean movie, Il Mare.

 Its kind of a long distance relationship. 

[Jun 2006]

by Mark O'Keefe and Steve Koren (Frank Coraci, director)
First release: 23 Jun 2006

Michael Newman falls asleep on a store mattress, and when he awakens, he is given a universal remote control that lets him fast forward through the boring parts of his life.

 Its an advanced piece of equipment like TiVo. 

[Feb 2010]

Broeck Steadman’s interior illustration
“Environmental Friendship Fossle”
by Ian Stewart
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2006
A contract investigator who tracks down crimes against endangered species finds a mammoth tusk that’s only 30 years old according to radiocarbon dating.

 “Mammoth ivory,” the old man said, as if it was a proposition put up for debate. “I have hunt mammoth.” 

[Jun 2006]

“The Teller of Time”
by Carl Frederick
First publication: Analog, Jul/Aug 2006
You get one guess what happens when you juxtapose these circumstances:
  1. As a boy, Kip Wolverton’s best friend is crushed in a tragic accident in a bell tower.
  2. Then, because Kip is too shy to ever approach the bell-ringer of his dreams, the girl goes and marries his other best friend, so Kip goes off to America to drown his sorrows and become an expert physicist studying time.
  3. Finally, 25 years later, Kip returns to England to do time experiments in bell towers where he finds girl grown and unhappily married.

     “Research money is difficult to come by these days,” said Neville. “There is a lot of good science lanuishing because more meretricious projects get the funds.” 

[Sep 2012]

English title: The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (translated from Japanese)
adaptation by Satoko Okudera (Mamoru Hosoda, director)
First release: 15 Jul 2006

In this loose anime adaptation of Yasutaka Tsutsui’s story, young Makoto Konno is thrown into a train crossing on her bike and unintentionally travels back in time to avoid being hit; that leads her to experiment with her ability—yes, with teenaged concerns, but still with charm.

 And then, when you came to, youd gone back a few minutes in time. 

[Feb 2013]

American Dragon
created by Jeff Goode
First time travel: 12 Aug 2006

Like all American teens, Asian-American Jake Long skateboards—oh, and he’s also the wise-cracking American Dragon, guardian of all magical creatures. In one episode (“Hero of the Hourglass”), Jake travels back to when his dad was a teen in order to get his mom to reveal the truth about magic and dragons.

 Or, I can change things for the better . . . ooh, theres a whole side of my family that my dad doesnt doesn't know about. I have the chance to change that, the chance to reverse the last twenty years and redo everything without the lies, the secrets, the being grounded every other week. 

[Sep 2012]

Scrat in No Time for Nuts
by Cris Renaud (Renaud and Mike Thurmeier, directors)
First release: 14 Sep 2006

Each time the machine of an unfortunate time traveler zaps Scrat’s Precious into an unknown time, the famed ice-age rat faithfully follows.

 Here stood . . . 
—[Youll have to watch yourself to find out what stood here, ’cause I’m not spoiling.]

[Jul 2013]

created by Tim Kring
First episode: 25 Sep 2006

Hiro Nakamura reads comic books, wants to be a hero, and believes that his will power is enough to move him through time and space (and, yes, it is).

I enjoyed talking about this show with my friend John Kennedy before he died of cancer on 18 Mar 2009.

 Save the cheerleader, save the world. 

[Sep 2006]

The Butterfly Effect 2
by John Frankenheimer and Michael D. Weiss (John R. Leonetti, director)
First release: 10 Oct 2006

 Theres this entire other version of my life without you. I went through this whole year of my life believing you were dead. 

[Sep 2012]

by Mike Resnick and Kevin J. Anderson
First publication: Analog Science Fiction, Nov 2006
Kyle Bain, a member of the Knights Temporal, goes on a mission to prevent a murder in the past because that’s what the Knights do—regardless of whether the murder may be just or not.

 Thou shalt UN-kill, whenever possible. 

[Dec 2006]

Day Break
created by Paul Zbyszewski
First episode: 15 Nov 2006

Detective Brett Hopper keeps waking up at the same time on the same day, but each day he learns more about who's trying to frame him.

 Maybe. Well see how the day goes. 

[Nov 2006]

Happy Tree Friends
by Aubrey Ankrum, Rhode Montijo, Kenn Navarro and Warren Graff
First time travel: 20 Nov 2006

Cute forest animals mutilate and maim each other with at least one time machine in “Blast from the Past” where Sniffles vainly tries to save his friends from playground death and mayhem.

 Cartoon Violence: Not recommended for small children or big babies 

[Jul 2013]

Déjà Vu
by Bill Marsilii and Terry Rossio (Tony Scott, director)
First release: 24 Nov 2006

While investigating the burning death of a young woman who washed up on shore a few minutes before a bomb demolished a New Orleans ferry, ATF Agent Doug Carlin gets pulled into an FBI investigation that can view happenings four days and six hours into the past.

Oh, who’s kidding whom? We all know these scientists never stop at mere viewing. I would have given more stars to this action movie if I could have figured out how Doug could live in a world where after the girl washes up dead, she is there to bandage him and answer the phone.

 Danny: Whatever you did, you did it already. Whether you send this note or you dont, it doesnt matter. You cannot change the past. Its physically impossible.
Agent Carlin: What if theres more than physics? 

[Aug 2012]

Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut
by Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster, Mario Puzo, et. al. (Richard Donner, director)
First release on dvd: 28 Nov 2006

Richard Donner, the original director of Superman II, was replaced partway through the production. Almost 30 years later, a dvd the movie was put together with mostly his footage and a time-travel ending that was pretty much identical to the end of Donner’s first Superman movie (and equally lame).

 Jeepers, I have seen some faraway looks in my time, but with that look, you might as well be on the North Pole or someplace. 

[Aug 2011]

Wonder Pets
created by Josh Selig
First time travel: “Save the Dinosaur”, 6 Dec 2006

When the kindergardeners leave for the day, three kindergarden pets—a hamster, a duck and a turtle, of course—save various different animals from perils, including one episode when the trio traveled into a classroom poster to save a trapped triceratops.

 Look! Theres there are dinosaurs in that poster! Lets go there! 

[Apr 2014]

Christmas Do-Over
by Trevor Reed Cristow and Jacqueline David (Catherine Cyran, director)
First release: 16 Dec 2006 (made-for-tv)

Kevin, a grump of a divorced father, reluctantly visits his ex-wife’s house on Christmas Day causing his son to wish it were Christmas every day. As in other repeat-Christmas stories (or repeat-a-certain-February-holiday), Kevin wakes up again and again on Christmas Day until he gets it right. And of course, only he knows the day is repeating.

 Dad, it’s so fun having you here. Go ahead and stay: I wish it was Christmas every day. 

[Oct 2015]

American Dad!
created by Seth MacFarlane, Mike Barker and Matt Weitzman
First time travel: 17 Dec 2006

Typical patriotic American family fare with Dad, Mom, two kids, an alien, a man trapped in a goldfish body, and the occassional romp through time.

 Best Christmas Story Never Told (17 Dec 2006)   to the 70s to kill Jane Fonda
May the Best Stan Win (14 Feb 2010)Cyborg Stan from the future
Fart-Break Hotel (16 Jan 2011)Steve travels to find a beauty
The Kidney Stays in the Picture (1 Apr 2012)back to discover Hayley’s dad

 Getting Scorsese off drugs means he never did all the cocaine that fueled him to make Taxi Driver, which means he never cast Jodie Foster, which means John Hinkley never obsessed over her, and he never tried to impress her by shooting President Reagan, which means Reagan was never empowered by surviving an assassination attempt—he must have lost to Mondale in ’84. Bingo! Forty-seven days into his presidency, Mondale handed complete control of the U.S. over to the Soviet Union. 
—from “The Best Christmas Story Never Told”

[sep 2012]

365 Tomorrow’s 2006 Time-Travel Stories

Note: § indicates a separate list entry for the story.

 A Lighthouse Through Time (31 Mar)by Kathy Kachelries
a renter disappears
Dropping a Pebble in a Dry Well (13 Apr)§by Kathy Kachelries
Zero Consequences
Suspension of Disbelief (31 May)§by B. York
time travel affects descendants
Fate of Our Futures (3 Aug)by Michael “Freeman” Herbaugh
3m year-old human skull found
Paranoia (12 Sep 2006)by Michael “Freeman” Herbaugh
time-travel researcher being watched
Time and Again (23 Sep)by Steven Perez
team hunts time travelers
Say Again? (12 Oct)by Steve Smith
Stan argues that he can time travel
One of a Kind (22 Oct)by Megan Hoffman (as by Pyai)
little brother time travels
Once in a Lifetime (25 Nov)by Matt Brubeck
time-traveling rich kids
Einstein’s Last Words (19 Dec)by J.S. Kachelries
traveler visits Einstein’s death

 You see, just before his death at 1:15 AM, he uttered his last words to the attending nurse. Unfortunately, he spoke them in German, and she only understood English. 
—“Einstein’s Last Words”

[May 2015]

Cinderella III: A Twist in Time
by Dan Berendsen, et. al. (Frank Nissen, director)
First release: 6 Feb 2007

Cinderella’s nasty stepmother uses the Fairy Godmother’s wand to turn back time and enlarge the slipper to fit one of the nasty stepsisters.

Computer animation has produced some nice stories, particularly as done by Pixar, but even the best computer animation can’t live up to the early Disney artists who produced the original Cinderella, and reasonably competent computer animation such as this Cinderella fare, can’t survive a weak storyline, lame dialogue, and tuneless songs.

In any case, here’s a relevant cost comparison in 2015 dollars:

 Cinderella (1950)$29 million
Cinderella III (2007)$9 million
Inside Out (2015)$175 million

 The wand is not a toy! 

[Aug 2014]

created by Adrian Hodges and Tim Haines
First episode: 10 Feb 2007

A time anomaly is allowing beasties from the past and future into present-day England. Oh, and Professor Cutter goes through the anomaly, too, because he’s searching for his lost wifey.

 Miss, oh Miss!! There’s a dinosaur on the playground. 

[Dec 2011]


by James P. Lay, Kenny Saylors and Kyle Saylors (Lay, director)
First release: 27 Feb 2007

Meghan and Dylan stop at a desert diner near Area 51 where they hear UFO and time travel stories. On the road again, their radio starts picking up Patsy Cline songs, they get separated, and Meghan has various scarey encounters including a spooky 8-year-old girl and newspaper clippings about top secret time travel experiments in the 60s.

I watched to the end (where there is about five minutes of song that tries to explain it all), but I won’t claim to understand the movie. One reviewer says that the spooky girl was abducted and subjected to government time travel experiments, and that the movie is populated by characters who are only in her mind as she travels through time (possibly people from the clippings). If so, then perhaps Meghan is the little girl’s imaginings of her own older self.

 Dont you get it? Theres no such thing as time, theres no such thing as this place, and theres no such thing as you. Meghan is a figment of her own imagination.